Reading This About the 1986 Machine Gun Ban Makes Me Angry
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Thread: Reading This About the 1986 Machine Gun Ban Makes Me Angry

  1. Reading This About the 1986 Machine Gun Ban Makes Me Angry

    Firearm Owners Protection Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Just read the part about the Hughes Amendment. It was struck down in the Senate but still somehow made it's way to President Reagan's desk. How can they be allowed to do something like that?! Maybe I'm young and naive, but it sickens me to see our system so flawed that the Constitution and due process are entirely thrown out the window. I sincerely hope that the Supreme Court deems each and every single gun control law around the country as unconstitutional tomorrow when we get the McDonald vs.Chicago decision tomorrow. This is an outrage and a huge deal, and I can't believe no one has ever brought this issue up.

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  3. #2
    They had to give the ATF something to actually do. If you venture further into the changes over the years of the ATF/BATFE you'll see that it was an antique agency virtually out of business when prohibition was lifted, hence the firearms act and tobacco legislation that followed.

    The BATFE is one agency that needs to be abolished. They serve little purpose in this day and age that other agencies haven't or could adopt as their own mission statement.

    Do away with them.


    The Clintons where very instumental in giving much latitude to the ATF for basically harassing FFLs into paperwork nightmare and eventual shutdown of FFLS across the US. If your ever thinking of applying for an FFL and starting your own stand alone gun shop your going to find that the ATF is going to be the one thing will haunt you in your line of business. Eventually to possibly being shut down for small infractions that no one, and I mean almost no one can keep up with in such a business.


    Organizational history
    The ATF was formerly part of the United States Department of the Treasury, having been formed in 1886 as the "Revenue Laboratory" within the Treasury Department's Bureau of Internal Revenue. The history of ATF can be subsequently traced to the time of the revenuers or "revenoors"[5] and the Bureau of Prohibition, which was formed as a unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue in 1920, was made an independent agency within the Treasury Department in 1927, was transferred to the Justice Department in 1930, and became, briefly, a division of the FBI in 1933.

    When the Volstead Act was repealed in December 1933, the Unit was transferred from the Department of Justice back to the Department of the Treasury where it became the Alcohol Tax Unit of the Bureau of Internal Revenue. Special Agent Eliot Ness and several members of The "Untouchables", who had worked for the Prohibition Bureau while the Volstead Act was still in force, were transferred to the ATU. In 1942, responsibility for enforcing federal firearms laws was given to the ATU.

    In the early 1950s, the Bureau of Internal Revenue was renamed "Internal Revenue Service" (IRS),[6] and the ATU was given the additional responsibility of enforcing federal tobacco tax laws. At this time, the name of the ATU was changed to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax Division (ATTD).

    In 1968, with the passage of the Gun Control Act, the agency changed its name again, this time to the Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Division of the IRS and first began to be referred to by the initials "ATF." In Title XI of the Organized Crime Control Act of 1970, Congress enacted the Explosives Control Act, 18 U.S.C.A. Chapter 40, which provided for close regulation of the explosives industry and designated certain arsons and bombings as federal crimes. The Secretary of the Treasury was made responsible for administering the regulatory aspects of the new law, and was given jurisdiction over criminal violations relating to the regulatory controls. These responsibilities were delegated to the ATF division of the IRS. The Secretary and the Attorney General were given concurrent jurisdiction over arson and bombing offenses. Pub.L. 91-452, 84 Stat. 922 October 15, 1970.

    In 1972 ATF was established as a separate Bureau within the Treasury Department when Treasury Department Order 221, effective July 1, 1972 transferred the responsibilities of the ATF division of the IRS to the new Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms. Rex D. Davis oversaw the transition, becoming the bureau's first director, having headed the division since 1970. During his tenure, Davis shepherded the organization into a new era where federal firearms and explosives laws addressing violent crime became the primary mission of the agency.[7] However, taxation and other alcohol issues remained priorities as ATF collected billions of dollars in alcohol and tobacco taxes, and undertook major revisions of the Federal wine labeling regulations relating to use of appellations of origin and varietal designations on wine labels.

    In the wake of the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, President George W. Bush signed into law the Homeland Security Act of 2002. In addition to creating of the Department of Homeland Security, the law shifted ATF from the Department of the Treasury to the Department of Justice. The agency's name was changed to Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. However, the agency still was referred to as the "ATF" for all purposes. Additionally, the task of collection of federal tax revenue derived from the production of tobacco and alcohol products and the regulatory function related to protecting the public in issues related to the production of alcohol, previously handled by the Bureau of Internal Revenue as well as by ATF, was transferred to the newly established Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), which remained within the Treasury Department. These changes took effect January 24, 2003.
    "When a government robs Peter to pay Paul it will alway's have the support of Paul" George Bernard Shaw

  4. #3
    Kinda sounds like what they're doing behind closed doors with the Illegal Immigrant situation, and circumventing the House and Senate. If the powers in office unilaterally get their way, we'll be supporting 11 to 18,000,000 Illegals. That is until they can take your job and benefits. Then maybe they will pay taxes, but who knows maybe their exempt from that as well. I am glad I at least got to see the United States when it was a somewhat free country.

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by THE DUKE OF ESSEX View Post
    Kinda sounds like what they're doing behind closed doors with the Illegal Immigrant situation, and circumventing the House and Senate. If the powers in office unilaterally get their way, we'll be supporting 11 to 18,000,000 Illegals. That is until they can take your job and benefits. Then maybe they will pay taxes, but who knows maybe their exempt from that as well. I am glad I at least got to see the United States when it was a somewhat free country.
    +1, Duke. Unfortunately, if this keeps up, future generations will NOT have the distinct pleasure of enjoying the unique freedoms that our Constitutional Republic was originally designed to guarantee.
    Conservative Wife & Mom -- I'm a Conservative Christian-American with dual citizenship...the Kingdom of God is my 1st home and the U.S.A. is my 2nd.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight View Post
    Firearm Owners Protection Act - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Just read the part about the Hughes Amendment. It was struck down in the Senate but still somehow made it's way to President Reagan's desk. How can they be allowed to do something like that?! Maybe I'm young and naive, but it sickens me to see our system so flawed that the Constitution and due process are entirely thrown out the window. I sincerely hope that the Supreme Court deems each and every single gun control law around the country as unconstitutional tomorrow when we get the McDonald vs.Chicago decision tomorrow. This is an outrage and a huge deal, and I can't believe no one has ever brought this issue up.
    Step Up...
    http://www.usacarry.com/forums/firea...1986-fopa.html

    "The people never give up their liberties, but under some delusion." - Edmund Burke

  7. #6
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conservative Wife & Mom View Post
    +1, Duke. Unfortunately, if this keeps up, future generations will NOT have the distinct pleasure of enjoying the unique freedoms that our Constitutional Republic was originally designed to guarantee.
    i agree 100% . what is popular is not nessacerly right, and what is right is not nessacerly popular!

  8. #7
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    I just changed the last passage in the Hughes Amendment section from " depending on whether" to ", especially now that".
    When they "Nudge. Shove. Shoot.",
    Don't retreat. Just reload.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Bohemian View Post
    I'm in. Just keep the thread updated on when the best time to act is and I'll send in my application accordingly.

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