Death row - appeals process - lucrative & corrupt - Page 2
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Thread: Death row - appeals process - lucrative & corrupt

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by antietam View Post
    Systems and policies are not perfect nor can they be made so. But our society's increasingly soft views on heinous crime, placing form in front of substance by playing the exception card, is a terrible injustice to the victim and loved ones.
    Innocent people convicted of crimes ARE victims.

    Innocent people executed for crimes they did not commit are victims of the most horrific injustice I can imagine.

    Moreover, when an innocenet person is convicted of a crime they did not commit, the real perpetrator is allowed to continue to make more people victims of his or her criminal activity.

    Two years ago Anthony Capozzi was freed after spending 22 years in prison for three rapes he never committed. While he was in prison the real rapist not only raped dozens more women but also killed three women in the process. DNA evidence collected from the last murder was compared with the DNA extracted from material from the rapes for which Capozzi was convicted and it matched, leading to Capozzi's exoneration and the eventual conviction of the real murder and rapist.

    The Wrongful Conviction of Anthony Capozzi

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  3. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Magistrate PO View Post
    As for being in a hurry to cover up the polices mistakes, do you honestly believe that?

    You need to read the story of Fred Zain.


    The disaster came in the form of Glen Woodall, convicted in 1987 of multiple felonies, including two counts of sexual assault, and sentenced to a prison term of 203 to 335 years. At Woodall's trial, Zain testified that, based upon his scientific analysis of semen recovered from the victims, "[t]he assailant's blood types ... were identical to Mr. Woodall's."

    Woodall's conviction was affirmed on appeal, but DNA testing done in a subsequent habeas corpus proceeding established that Woodall could not have been the perpetrator. His conviction was overturned in 1992 and Woodall was freed. Woodall sued the State of West Virginia for false imprisonment, and received $1 million in settlement.

    This ultimately led to an extraordinary investigation of the entire body of Zain's work ordered by the West Virginia Supreme Court. The report concluded that the actual guilt of 134 people was substantively in doubt because the convictions were based on inculpatory reports and/or testimony by Zain. Nine men have been freed because the remaining evidence offered against them was insufficient for conviction ~ the expert testimony of Fred Zain alone had put them in prison.

  4. #13
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    I don't see anything disagreeable in your points. Something as serious as the death sentence should involve special and extraordinary TRUTH-seeking procedures. Perhaps these measures that you propose would be the balance needed to make the process credible.

  5. #14
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    You don't take the car (victim justice) to the junk yard because it leaks oil. You replace the $10 gasket and keep the car. Death sentence problems are fixable but everybody's hanging on the ends of the pole on the issue - few are in the middle - where the answer awaits. You either WANT justice or you want a medal for appearing open-minded. If your loved one was the victim, God forbid, you would not be so liberal with defendant compassion.

  6. #15
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    Can you address the bigger number? Can you address the unspeakable crimes against children, adults and their loved ones? Can you detach yourself from the less significant stories of exceptions and get on board with the masses of flesh and blood victims to which you're trying to invalidate? Just asking …

  7. #16
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    Hear, hear! Well said. Since common sense is low in the legal community's system of priorities, and money drives its philosophical stance on this issue, we are not surprised that a confessed heinous murderer, whose guilt evidence is overwhelming, receives a six figure defense to prolong the injustice of deference, mocking both victim and loved ones. These corrupt policies and the obvious Marxist-socialist president and associate House and Senate Members whom we foolishly elected are more reasons that civil war is more justified now than it was in 1860. To think that we can vote ourselves out of this one is the epitome of naivety.

  8. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerrfers View Post
    Why do we even need lawyers if we have guns and common sense?
    The problem with nonsense is that it is all too common and often gets wrongfully depicted as common sense.

  9. #18
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    I formerly supported capital punishment. Having seen several IL deathrow inmates exonerated by DNA testing, I cannot support such a flawed system. All of these people were convicted by juries convinced of their guilt "beyond reasonable doubt". Obviously not good enough.

  10. #19
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    I read a book probably ten years ago about a guy named Dale Adams who spent about 12 years on death row in Texas for killing a police officer.

    It was finally determined that he was innocent and he was released shortly before his scheduled execution.
    Can you imagine that? It was so scary to me that it's stuck with me all this time. I can't tell you what I did last Monday, but I can remember Dale Adam's name.

    I don't have a problem with the death penalty. Hell I'll pull the trigger or throw the switch! But I think it's important to make darn sure we caught the right guy.

  11. #20
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    I agree completely. The determination of guilt criteria needs to be special; tightened up. Some cases are blatantly obvious with copious evidence, other cases less obvious. But once the guilty verdict is dealt the punishment should be swift - swift in the area of 30 days. Sure, a percentage of lawyers will have to file bankruptcy and quit the country club, a percentage of prisons will have to lay off some staff. A few accountant jobs will be created to handle the tax-saved revenue. The victim and loved ones will have the first sense of justice in this country related to heinous crimes (because I believe the death penalty should apply to several heinous crimes other than murder - definition of "heinous", pending) in nearly a hundred years. Any scientific report claiming that capital punishment delivered in this form is non deterrent is bogus and probably money-compromised.

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