Voting Rights
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Thread: Voting Rights

  1. #1
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    Voting Rights

    Let me start by saying I agree with you guys on many things. However, one issue I consistently see on these threads with which I disagree with you is on who should be allowed to vote. Allow me to explain.

    I will acknowledge that there is no "right" to vote found in the Constitution. The Constitution, via the 15th (making it illegal to keep anyone from voting on account of race), the 19th (making it illegal to keep anyone from voting on account of sex), 23rd (paving the way for DC residents to vote in presidential elections), 24th (abolition of poll taxes) and 26th (18-year olds can't be denied on account of age) amendments, simply tells states that people can't be denied suffrage on those grounds, meaning technically, the states are free to deny suffrage on any other grounds. Typically the only groups not heretofore mentioned who have been denied suffrage "rights" are children and felons.

    I regularly read on these forums from many on here that many of you believe that anyone who isn't a homeowner shouldn't be allowed to vote. I can unserstand why you'd feel that non-citizens, people who receive public aid, felons, etc shouldn't be able to vote, but people who don't own homes? Why? That would automatically eliminate people who live with their parents, college students, and people like myself who work but don't make enough money to pay a monthly mortgage. I can't speak for other renters, but I work, I pay taxes, I pay my rent and utilities on time every month, I haven't made a bunch of babies I can't afford, I don't have a criminal record, and none of my personal expenses are taxpayer-subsidized. So why do you guys feel I'm not worthy of the priviledge to vote?

    By the way, I happen to believe that ALL adults (yes even felons and those receiving public aid) should be able to vote, because EVERYONE has a stake in the decisions elected officials make, even if that stake is one that working home owners don't like.

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  3. #2
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    You lost me on allowing felons to vote. They broke the law and have been convicted of braking the law. They have lost this privilege as well as some others, in my opinion. If they can keep their nose clean and prove to society they can behave themselves, they can regain this privilege over time. I know people make mastakes, it happens, part of human nature. Why is it progressive liberals refuse to hold people accountable? You make a mistake, you get caught involved in a crime, ok, take resposibility, do the time and move on. That's the trouble with todays society, "It's always somebody elses fault". Even our so called leaders refuse to take resposibility for their actions. Just my opinion.
    "You can get a lot accomplished if you don't care who gets the credit" - Ronald Reagan

  4. #3
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    Many felons recover their suffrage after they're released from prison, and that's as it should be.

    I've heard similar suggestions about homeowners voting, usually when it comes to property tax levies. The suggestion is that you shouldn't have any say in voting in a tax that you won't have to pay. I actually don't have a problem with that idea, if you could easily restrict voting on such issues.

    I've already stated my position on restricting suffrage due to receiving public aid.

    I think the biggest problem these days is people feeling their vote doesn't matter.
    Bob Mueller
    Blog | Facebook | Flickr

  5. I agree that non-homeowners should be able to vote. I've never seen it suggested, on this forums or otherwise, that they shouldn't. I very well could've just missed it. That is just an asinine idea.

    However, I do disagree that felons should be allowed to vote. There must be some consequence to committing violent crimes, which brings up another point. A felony should be taken back toward its original meaning, a violent crime or one that endangers innocent people. There are far too many things that are felonies that shouldn't be and many that aren't that should be.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tattedupboy View Post
    Let me start by saying I agree with you guys on many things. However, one issue I consistently see on these threads with which I disagree with you is on who should be allowed to vote. Allow me to explain.

    I will acknowledge that there is no "right" to vote found in the Constitution. The Constitution, via the 15th (making it illegal to keep anyone from voting on account of race), the 19th (making it illegal to keep anyone from voting on account of sex), 23rd (paving the way for DC residents to vote in presidential elections), 24th (abolition of poll taxes) and 26th (18-year olds can't be denied on account of age) amendments, simply tells states that people can't be denied suffrage on those grounds, meaning technically, the states are free to deny suffrage on any other grounds. Typically the only groups not heretofore mentioned who have been denied suffrage "rights" are children and felons.

    I regularly read on these forums from many on here that many of you believe that anyone who isn't a homeowner shouldn't be allowed to vote. I can unserstand why you'd feel that non-citizens, people who receive public aid, felons, etc shouldn't be able to vote, but people who don't own homes? Why? That would automatically eliminate people who live with their parents, college students, and people like myself who work but don't make enough money to pay a monthly mortgage. I can't speak for other renters, but I work, I pay taxes, I pay my rent and utilities on time every month, I haven't made a bunch of babies I can't afford, I don't have a criminal record, and none of my personal expenses are taxpayer-subsidized. So why do you guys feel I'm not worthy of the priviledge to vote?

    By the way, I happen to believe that ALL adults (yes even felons and those receiving public aid) should be able to vote, because EVERYONE has a stake in the decisions elected officials make, even if that stake is one that working home owners don't like.
    Agree on everything but the felon part. People must understand, before they commit the crime, that doing so will result in a loss of this right. Therefor the right wasn't wrongfully stripped but instead they made the decision not to vote.
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

  7. #6
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    All US citizens 18 and older should be able to vote with out any restrictions what so ever. As for Felons, once they have served their time all of their constitutional rights should be fully restored.

  8. #7
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    You guys are suggesting that felons never be allowed to vote again? How can you justify that? You want them to become functioning and contributing members of society, but you won't let them vote?

    AFAIC, once they're out of prison, and off of post-release control, all rights should be restored. Why just restrict the right to vote, and the right to an effective means of self-defense? Should any other rights be restricted?
    Bob Mueller
    Blog | Facebook | Flickr

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooCalm:221519
    All US citizens 18 and older should be able to vote with out any restrictions what so ever. As for Felons, once they have served their time all of their constitutional rights should be fully restored.
    I apparently gave the impression that I was in favor of giving felons the right to vote while they are incarcerated. I am not. When they are released, as far as I'm concerned, they have paid their debt to society and, as long as they don't go back to their old ways, they shouldn't be treated any worse than the law abiding.

  10. In agreement with most; felons should get their rights back after they've served their time. Otherwise, we permanently brand them to the point where crime will CONTINUE to be more appealing than being productive.

    I have the same opinion of the "sex offender" label. That label can get applied for fairly minor things - like two consenting 15 year olds having sex; if we are going to say we're punishing someone for life, stick 'em in jail the whole time. Or at least insist that they be on probation for a long time upon release, meaning they're still technically being punished. But if you're claiming their punishment is over, it needs to be over.

    As for only homeowners getting a say in property taxes; that diminishes people who pay property taxes indirectly. Even if you're renting, you're paying property taxes. You're just paying it through one single person (the owner.) So if one person owns 10 homes and rents them out, that one person would only get one single vote for property taxes, when in reality there would be 10 people who would have to pay them. (If you rent out a house, and DON'T pass the taxes through, then you're being disingenuous. When I rented out my 'bachelor pad' after my now-wife and I moved in to a new house together, I made it clear in the contract that rent would change every year based on the new year's property taxes.)

  11. #10
    Homeowners? How many people in the U.S. actually own there homes? By far most supposed "Homeowners" are living in homes that are in fact owned by a bank or credit union to whom they pay monthly mortgage "rent" to live there. As many people have found out in the last few years, even paying extra principal payments to try to pay off a mortgage faster does not result in any benefit with the bank when one is no longer able to make payments. Just because one is a renter should not preclude them from voting. Those on "The Dole" however are another matter.

    The root word of mortgage is "mort" as in "until death".
    A man's life, liberty, and property are only safe when the legislature is NOT in session. Will Rogers

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