Question about VP candidates.
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Thread: Question about VP candidates.

  1. #1

    Question Question about VP candidates.

    Another thread prompted me to ask this question. What qualifies someone as a good Vice-Presidential candidate? Is it over-all experience? Should one particular policy experience be enough, such as foreign policy, judicial experience (should a law degree even be necessary), military experience, popularity, personality, a pretty face,........what?
    I would assume an intelligent speaker would come in handy, as would the ability to shut up.

    Just curious what would make you folks feel good about one VP candidate over another. Would the VP candidate affect your voting for a presidential candidate they're running with in a significant way?
    "When war does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard."
    Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson

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  3. #2
    Essie Mae Washington-Williams for VP!

  4. Well, we have to look at the VP as a possible President.
    If something happens to the POTUS the VP is next in line so I take this into consideration. I don't put it in as high regard because in all likelihood the POTUS will serve his full term.

    Another job of the VP is President of the Senate. If the Senate is split 50-50 on a vote the VP serves as the tie breaker.
    He is also a kind of a PR guy for the POTUS so he should be able to follow the same logic.

    In our last election I was really not sure who I wanted to vote for because I didn't like either candidate. I was really thinking of not voting at all, but when McCain announced Palin my vote went to him. I still wasn't happy of either candidate but I figured if McCain didn't make it through his term at least we would have someone that I felt would do an okay job.
    I'm not a lawyer so take it for what it's worth. For legal advice ask a lawyer.
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    Those who accept second best must learn to live with mediocrity. - pafindr

  5. #4
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    I'd like things to return to the olden days, where the VP was the losing candidate.
    Bob Mueller
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  6. #5
    Definitely, the VP candidate comes into my decision. When you consider that 32% of former VP's have become POTUS, it seems almost irresponsible not to factor them in.
    "You don't hurt 'em if you don't hit 'em." (Lieutenant General Lewis B. Puller, USMC, 1962.)
    Land Of The Free... Void Where Prohibited By Law.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by SGTSKI View Post
    Definitely, the VP candidate comes into my decision. When you consider that 32% of former VP's have become POTUS, it seems almost irresponsible not to factor them in.
    Wow 32%? I didn't realize it was that much.
    I'm not a lawyer so take it for what it's worth. For legal advice ask a lawyer.
    --------------------------------------------------------
    Those who accept second best must learn to live with mediocrity. - pafindr

  8. #7
    I know, I was surprised too. Its actually 14 total, not counting times when a VP has been "Acting President", such as Cheney when Bush was sedated for surgery etc. Also consider that this is counting former VP's who ran for, and were elected POTUS and VP's that had to serve a partial term (assasination etc.)
    "You don't hurt 'em if you don't hit 'em." (Lieutenant General Lewis B. Puller, USMC, 1962.)
    Land Of The Free... Void Where Prohibited By Law.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by SGTSKI View Post
    I know, I was surprised too. Its actually 14 total, not counting times when a VP has been "Acting President", such as Cheney when Bush was sedated for surgery etc. Also consider that this is counting former VP's who ran for, and were elected POTUS and VP's that had to serve a partial term (assasination etc.)
    Ok when a VP runs for President that's different because we are voting for him on his own merit.

    I looked it up and we have nine that became President because a sitting President died or stepped down. So it's 20% which is still a lot. Makes you realize that we (the US) really hasn't been around that long. lol
    I'm not a lawyer so take it for what it's worth. For legal advice ask a lawyer.
    --------------------------------------------------------
    Those who accept second best must learn to live with mediocrity. - pafindr

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by pafindr View Post
    Ok when a VP runs for President that's different because we are voting for him on his own merit
    Agreed, but IMO sitting as VP greatly improves your political "foothold." It seems many a VP have used their status to launch a bid for the Presidency (for better or worse), and I find myself wondering how much influence the title had in those cases... But such is politics I guess
    "You don't hurt 'em if you don't hit 'em." (Lieutenant General Lewis B. Puller, USMC, 1962.)
    Land Of The Free... Void Where Prohibited By Law.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeauRyker View Post
    Another thread prompted me to ask this question. What qualifies someone as a good Vice-Presidential candidate? Is it over-all experience? Should one particular policy experience be enough, such as foreign policy, judicial experience (should a law degree even be necessary), military experience, popularity, personality, a pretty face,........what?
    I would assume an intelligent speaker would come in handy, as would the ability to shut up.

    Just curious what would make you folks feel good about one VP candidate over another. Would the VP candidate affect your voting for a presidential candidate they're running with in a significant way?
    Heartbeat?
    Actually, it seems to be whomever can garner the most support, especially from the "tougher" states. I can't see Barack Obama really giving a crap WHO his VP is as long as he can help HIM get elected/re-elected. As I recall, JFK couldn't stand Johnson. Harry Truman was never even brought in on the "bomb," and brought on board by FDR to replace Henry Wallace whom he felt was too liberal. Nixon and Eisenhower were never very close, either. These are just a couple of examples that I remember. I think the biggest factor is who can "even out" the ticket and bring in the most votes.
    Who are the militia? Are they not ourselves? Is it feared, then, that we shall turn our arms each man gainst his own bosom. Congress have no power to disarm the militia...Tenche Coxe, The Pennsylvania Gazette, Feb. 20, 1788.

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