Fed's GPS Tracker found on SUV this past week
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Thread: Fed's GPS Tracker found on SUV this past week

  1. #1

    Fed's GPS Tracker found on SUV this past week

    Busted! Two New Fed GPS Trackers Found on SUV | Threat Level | Wired.com

    EXCERPTS

    ......
    The young man, who asked to be identified only as Greg, is one among an increasing number of U.S. citizens who are finding themselves tracked with the high-tech devices.


    The 25-year-old resident of San Jose, California, says he found the first one about three weeks ago on his Volvo SUV while visiting his mother in Modesto, about 80 miles northeast of San Jose. After contacting Wired and allowing a photographer to snap pictures of the device, it was swapped out and replaced with a second tracking device. A witness also reported seeing a strange man looking beneath the vehicle of the young manís girlfriend while her car was parked at work, suggesting that a tracking device may have been retrieved from her car.
    Then things got really weird when police showed up during a Wired interview with the man.


    When this reporter drove down to meet Greg and photograph the second tracker with photographer Snyder, three police cars appeared at the location that had been pre-arranged with Greg, at various points driving directly behind me without making any verbal contact before leaving.

    After moving the photo shoot to a Rotten Robbie gas station a mile away from the first location, another police car showed up. In this case, the officer entered the station smiling at me and turned his car around to face the direction of Gregís car, a couple hundred yards away. He remained there while the device was photographed. A passenger in the police car, dressed in civilian clothes, stepped out of the vehicle to fill a gas container, then the two left shortly before the photo shoot was completed.

    The Obama administration will be defending the warrantless use of such trackers in front of the Supreme Court on Tuesday morning. The administration, which is attempting to overturn a lower court ruling that threw out a drug dealerís conviction over the warrantless use of a tracker, argues that citizens have no expectation of privacy when it comes to their movements in public so officers donít need to get a warrant to use such devices.

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  3. #2
    Mail that sucker to a non existent address on the other side of the state. Let it sit in a postal dead locker. Better, mail it to Janet Napolitano or President Obama.
    "Each worker carried his sword strapped to his side." Nehemiah 4:18
    Guns Save Lives. Paramedics Save Lives. But...
    Paramedics With Guns Scare People!

  4. #3
    mmmmmmm. Exactly what would we do if we found one? Food for thought.

  5. #4
    If you carry a cellphone they can track you already.

  6. #5
    Join Date
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    Any device attached to my car is my property and I will ship it anywhere I desire, have fun. Have a small property in South Texas, knock out a ferel hog and collar him with it should be interesting. Or next time you are around the court house stick it on a judges car or police car at donut shop. All sort of fun possibilites.

  7. #6
    Join Date
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    I'd lean more toward "Greg" in the OP actually being closer to an "Abdulah".

    Maybe I'm just real naive but I just don't see the Feds putting tracking devices on random vehicles, warrant-less or not. I just don't think this was done for sh1ts and giggles by the Feds or anyone else.

    But if the Feds are targeting people that fit a particular demographic and tracking their activity "in the name of National Security" I hope the courts nail whoever made the decision to go forward with the program.

    More than likely we'll find out this is a part of Fast and Furious that is just coming to the surface. I wouldn't put anything past that dirt bag Eric Holder.

    Any way this turns out, the act alone is a complete invasion of privacy.
    To not stand against injustice is to stand for it.
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    My personality is who I am, my attitude depends on who you are.

  8. Yeah I don't get it either. Why track someone without cause? Knowing where someone goes is pointless unless you NEED to know where that person is going

  9. #8
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cotillion View Post
    Yeah I don't get it either. Why track someone without cause? Knowing where someone goes is pointless unless you NEED to know where that person is going
    Hence putting a collar on a wild pig.

  10. #9
    We move in public with the obvious full knowledge that people see us.

    Therefore the catch right now seems to be that the government's position is that citizens have no reasonable expectation of privacy when moving in public. Either for being photographed, audio recorded, or tracked by GPS.

    Our cells phones are a willfull use item, we know they have GPS in them and we use them anyway.
    Of course all cell phones can be tracked by GPS by law enforcement and 911, but does that need a warrant? Not if you dial 911, or willfully have your phone set on non-restricted GPS. Smart phones have automatic GPS "remembering". The feds admitted in court of using covert cell tracking and audio spying programs against criminals.

    The problem comes in when somneone attachs something to our vehicle without our permission.

    As someone said, why should we worry if we are not doing anything wrong?

    For the same reason that allowing the feds access and control of our CCW permits MIGHT/COULD evolve into gun confiscation.

    Their point is that states should reciprocate CCW permits like they do driver's licenses. THEY ALREADY DO. WE DON'T NEED FEDS INVOLVED.
    When we are in other states, we observe their traffic laws. We don't need feds to regulate the traffic laws either.

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Shumway View Post
    We move in public with the obvious full knowledge that people see us.

    Therefore the catch right now seems to be that the government's position is that citizens have no reasonable expectation of privacy when moving in public. Either for being photographed, audio recorded, or tracked by GPS.

    Our cells phones are a willfull use item, we know they have GPS in them and we use them anyway.
    Of course all cell phones can be tracked by GPS by law enforcement and 911, but does that need a warrant? Not if you dial 911, or willfully have your phone set on non-restricted GPS. Smart phones have automatic GPS "remembering". The feds admitted in court of using covert cell tracking and audio spying programs against criminals.

    The problem comes in when somneone attachs something to our vehicle without our permission.

    As someone said, why should we worry if we are not doing anything wrong?

    For the same reason that allowing the feds access and control of our CCW permits MIGHT/COULD evolve into gun confiscation.

    Their point is that states should reciprocate CCW permits like they do driver's licenses. THEY ALREADY DO. WE DON'T NEED FEDS INVOLVED.
    When we are in other states, we observe their traffic laws. We don't need feds to regulate the traffic laws either.
    The only problem being that the States have NOT gotten their act together on recogizing each other's permits as readily as driver's licenses which is why we now have the whole national carry proposal going. It's not as if there isn't a need for that.

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