Joint Chiefs Chairman: Forces Just Hours Away From Benghazi!
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Thread: Joint Chiefs Chairman: Forces Just Hours Away From Benghazi!

  1. #1

    Joint Chiefs Chairman: Forces Just Hours Away From Benghazi!

    JERUSALEM In a bombshell admission that has until now gone unreported, Martin Dempsey, chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff, conceded that highly trained Special Forces were stationed just a few hours away from Benghazi on the night of the attacks but were not told to deploy to Libya.

    In comments that may warrant further investigation, Dempsey stated at a Senate hearing Wednesday that on the night of the Sept. 11, 2012, attack, command of the Special Forces known as C-110, or the EUCOM CIF was transferred from the military's European command to AFRICOM, or the United States Africa Command.

    Dempsey did not state any reason for the strange transfer of command nor could he provide a timeline for the transfer the night of the attack.

    REST OF STORY HERE: Admission: Special Forces were only hours from Benghazi
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  3. #2
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    Do you have any military experience at all? You can't just call up a special forces unit and say "Hey run over to Lybia and whup some ass for us. " It takes time to dial up a unit and get it moving
    See, it's mumbo jumbo like that and skinny little lizards like you thinking they the last dragon that gives Kung Fu a bad name.
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  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treo View Post
    Do you have any military experience at all? You can't just call up a special forces unit and say "Hey run over to Lybia and whup some ass for us. " It takes time to dial up a unit and get it moving
    I do have, and I beg to disagree. There are units that require members to remain within x minutes of base just for this kind of thing.

    I've heard the argument made that help could not have gotten there in time. Really more of a rationalization.
    At the time the decision was made, were the men dead or alive? And if they were still alive (which is true, right?) then who could know how long they'd hold out? Did the person making the call have a crystal ball?

    So much for no man left behind. Disgraceful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kerb View Post
    I do have, and I beg to disagree. There are units that require members to remain within x minutes of base just for this kind of thing.

    I've heard the argument made that help could not have gotten there in time. Really more of a rationalization.
    At the time the decision was made, were the men dead or alive? And if they were still alive (which is true, right?) then who could know how long they'd hold out? Did the person making the call have a crystal ball?

    So much for no man left behind. Disgraceful.

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    Even the RDF at Ft. Bragg takes 24 hours to get rolling

    I have some problems with just calling them up and sending them in.

    First, how is the host country going to react? Sending uninvited troops into a foreign country is called an invasion. There’s also the question of how the Libyan air force is going to react to foreign planes entering their airspace. That’s not something nations just do lightly with out considering the consequences and (IMO) the amount of time they would have spent just on that issue would have been more than they had.

    Then there was the question of intelligence. What do we do, just fly the troops into the middle of the battle and drop them? The Army doesn’t move like that. They would have had to spend at least some time figuring out exactly what was going on and deciding exactly what the scope of the mission was going to be (defend the embassy or rescue and evacuate the staff, which would have raised its own set of headaches.) which, again IMO, would have been more than they had.

    Lastly, once the troops are there how do you support them and how do you get them out once the mission is complete? Once we drop the invading troops in the middle of this mess are the Libyans just going to ignore the fact that they’re there? Are we going to go from fighting a mob to holding an airhead against the Libyan army? If that’s what happens how are we going to keep the air lines of communication open? Not to say it couldn’t be done but it would take time to coordinate, which, again IMO, would have been more than they had.

    I am convinced that once you start adding up the support issues involved with an operation like this there just wasn’t enough time to get the ball rolling
    See, it's mumbo jumbo like that and skinny little lizards like you thinking they the last dragon that gives Kung Fu a bad name.
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  6. #5

    Joint Chiefs Chairman: Forces Just Hours Away From Benghazi!

    Let's just say that, logistically, your correct TREO. I prefer to take the opinion of the Joint Chiefs Chairman but lets just run with your thought process. How would they know how long the attack would last? If they knew and let it happen then we have some real problems. If they didn't know how long, how does our POS POTUS sit there an offer no support? If your daughter or son called you with their exact location and that they were being attacked, would you just sit there? F no. The POTUS just let the lives of Americans be taken with little concern. He went to bed. Turned a cold shoulder to Americans. What a POS.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Treo View Post
    Even the RDF at Ft. Bragg takes 24 hours to get rolling

    I have some problems with just calling them up and sending them in.

    First, how is the host country going to react? Sending uninvited troops into a foreign country is called an invasion. There’s also the question of how the Libyan air force is going to react to foreign planes entering their airspace. That’s not something nations just do lightly with out considering the consequences and (IMO) the amount of time they would have spent just on that issue would have been more than they had.

    Then there was the question of intelligence. What do we do, just fly the troops into the middle of the battle and drop them? The Army doesn’t move like that. They would have had to spend at least some time figuring out exactly what was going on and deciding exactly what the scope of the mission was going to be (defend the embassy or rescue and evacuate the staff, which would have raised its own set of headaches.) which, again IMO, would have been more than they had.

    Lastly, once the troops are there how do you support them and how do you get them out once the mission is complete? Once we drop the invading troops in the middle of this mess are the Libyans just going to ignore the fact that they’re there? Are we going to go from fighting a mob to holding an airhead against the Libyan army? If that’s what happens how are we going to keep the air lines of communication open? Not to say it couldn’t be done but it would take time to coordinate, which, again IMO, would have been more than they had.

    I am convinced that once you start adding up the support issues involved with an operation like this there just wasn’t enough time to get the ball rolling
    Special Forces Units are on call 24/7. Individual teams are on ready standby for deployment to anywhere in the World in a specifc time frame which is less then most think is possiable.
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  8. #7
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    First of all this would not have been an invasion it would have been a rescue mission. Big difference. As has been stated no one knew how long this was going to last. We have teams ready to go in a moments notice. One problem we have now is none of our enemies fears us any more. The fact that some one made the conscious decision to not send help just adds more credence to not fear us. Fear of action is a good peace maker in my opinion. Who ever made the decision not to send help, has some explaining to do.
    "You can get a lot accomplished if you don't care who gets the credit" - Ronald Reagan

  9. #8
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    I'm not saying that the decision was made to abandon the embassy I just think it was over before they had time to react.
    See, it's mumbo jumbo like that and skinny little lizards like you thinking they the last dragon that gives Kung Fu a bad name.
    http://www.gunrightsmedia.com/ Internet forum dedicated to second amendment

  10. #9
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    The decision was made to abandon the embassy as no rescue mission was even attempted. No one knew how long it would last. The issue is why was no rescue attempt made and who was it that made the conscious decision to not make an attempt?
    "You can get a lot accomplished if you don't care who gets the credit" - Ronald Reagan

  11. #10
    Because they didn’t try, then well never know. But next week, Retired Gen. Carter Ham will be questioned about his oversight of military assets. At the time of the attack Ham was serving as Commander of AFRICOM.
    Ham's retirement was announced just weeks after the incident, sparking rumors that he was being pushed aside after having expressed his desire for a more aggressive military response
    Lt. Col. Steve "Hoot" Gibson and RADM Brian Losey are also scheduled to testify next Wednesday. Gibson is the Army lieutenant colonel who was in charge of a small group of special operators that, according to Deputy Chief of Mission Greg Hicks, received "stand down" orders after requesting to move from Tripoli to Benghazi on Sept. 12. RADM Brian Losey is the former Special Operations Commander for Africa who is said to have administered those orders.
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

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