Would you buy a firearm that was made in an anti gun state? - Page 9
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Thread: Would you buy a firearm that was made in an anti gun state?

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluesStringer View Post
    No, you didn't tell me in get this 2013 that the laws were changing, you kept insisting that your state is "moving" to change laws and other ambiguous, meaningless chatter.

    And "I'm" not rating your state at all. I simply linked info for you to demonstrate how happy with NC the Brady Bunch is. 2011 is the latest rating schedule available. Your beef should be with them if you disagree with either their rating or how current their available information is.

    Since you can't seem to source a word you're saying about NC "moving" in 2013 from the permit-to-purchase-a-handgun law that I thought I remembered existed in NC, I went and did a little homework for you. This is the 2013 revision of your state's AG summary of firearms laws for law enforcement as of 2/19/2013. Check it out:



    So you have to ask permission from your anti-2nd-Amendment state government even to transfer a firearm between private parties! Man! It's much worse than I thought!

    And you got (at least) another thing wrong. You said the purchase permit doesn't apply to rifles or shotguns in this glittering jewel of monumental ignorance:



    Wrong. From the same publication:



    Oops.





    Either that or you are for living in an anti-gun state! LOL! Man! You're too easy!



    They don't need to ban any when they make every single purchase almost impossible to complete! LOL!

    And I can walk into my local gun store and walk out with any non-NFA firearm I'm willing to pay for. No waiting periods, no permit to purchase, no bans, no NFA restrictions, no training requirements, no waiting for either purchase or carry permit (carry permit issued on the spot), strong state preemption law, so no local or county ordinances that differ according to lines on a map that no one could possibly comply with while traveling (your state does allow local control of some firearms laws - Yay freedom, eh?!), no restrictions on private transfers (you have to ask permission to privately buy or sell, or even inherit a weapon! Are you kidding me????) - Good grief man, I could go on forever listing all the anti-gun laws and strict gun control laws you support every time you earn a dollar or pay your sales, property or petro taxes.

    I've made a decision. I'm going to heed your advice and stop supporting anti-gun states. Just for fun, I'm starting in the middle of the pack and working my way up. I hereby declare a personal boycott of the egregiously anti-gun state of North Carolina.

    I hope you're packin' up and moving to someplace more gun-friendly, bigreb. Bama probably wouldn't be a good choice for you though, because we put as much emphasis on the "friendly" part as the "gun" part. Otherwise, good luck and keep in touch. Always great to hear from the South end of a Northbound ass. LOL!

    Blues
    Dumb ass you don't need a license to own or carry a firearm except for conceal carry and I think your state has certain restrictions to your conceal carry. My state you lying prick doesn't have any gun bans

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  3. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigrebnc1861 View Post
    Dumb ass you don't need a license to own or carry a firearm except for conceal carry and I think your state has certain restrictions to your conceal carry. My state you lying prick doesn't have any gun bans
    Does your mommy know you're playing with her computer?

    I'm tempted to call you the biggest giantest poopest head in the whole world, but I already strained my brain to remember that far back into the kind of playground insults you'd understand.

    No one has ever heard me say that I "hate" cops, because I don't. This is why I will never trust one again though: You just never know...

  4. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluesStringer View Post
    Does your mommy know you're playing with her computer?

    I'm tempted to call you the biggest giantest poopest head in the whole world, but I already strained my brain to remember that far back into the kind of playground insults you'd understand.

    My mothers dead you bastard. But still your irrelevant with your bull **** links you are giving money to anti gun states go on your masters are wanting to push more anti gun agenda.

  5. #84
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  6. #85
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    Better to support an American company in an anti gun state than a foreign company. I don't see it as supporting a state's anti gun agenda as much as I see it going towards supporting American workers and American jobs.

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 4 Beta
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

  7. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7yFQQd View Post
    Ignorant is the right word, but more fitting for your argument. These companies did nothing significant to protect our rights either, because they know ignorant conservatives and investors will buy their products and stocks as long as they "get theirs" whatever - profits, guns - no matter what the societal consequences, and the governments will keep the big ones in business in any case.
    And they are getting very generous tax brakes and other benefit offers to move! Basically, in the long-term, it would cost them nothing, and many examples of that already exist.

    Further ignorance is thinking that clothes, vehicles, or any other thing are the same as armaments. That's why the 2nd amendment in the Bill of Rights is specifically about armaments, an not our clothes, or right to healthcare! And it's not 2nd by accident either!
    I guess Columbia University was wrong. I should ask for my tuition money back.
    .
    And while I understand and agree with the argument in principal, the simple truth is that corporations aren't in the human business. Consider this; how many people do we all know that were hired by some big company who was "looking for a team player." When profits slip guess who's not on the team? The company. Corporations aren't people. They don't have a conscience. The are in the profit business pure and simple.







    Quote Originally Posted by bigrebnc1861 View Post
    No that dog doesn't hunt when you say "Expecting they have millions of dollars to move" companies do it all the time.
    Companies do it all the time when the numbers work. Otherwise they cease to exist.
    .
    When you've founded and been the CEO of a company doing $12-$14 million annually you can argue with me. The average publicly traded corporation doesn't have that kind of cash sitting around. They must raise the money from investment banks or release more stock in the public market to accomplish this. When you take-on debt your stock prices drop. Your earnings to share price ratio gets out of balance. people dump the stock fearing loss. Company net worth drops. When you've completed the move you must break-up and sell-of the assets that aren't able to be relocated such as manufacturing facilities and land. The real-estate DOES NOT SELL. You eat it. And then there's those pesky employee buyouts. HUGE bucks. Early retirement packages and severance payouts. This works well when the breakup value in an undervalued company exceeds it's operational value. It doesn't work when the company is highly profitable. Thus there's a huge loss.
    .
    Further, publicly traded companies must file an annual 10-K report to the Securities and Exchange Commission. This report provides information on past performance and assumptions regarding future fiscal condition. It encompasses such areas as risk factors, selected financials (balance sheet, equity statement, etc,) market risk, risk from legislative actions, assumptions on future expansion plans and costs, income statement, deferred costs... basically the financial condition of the company. Here's a link to S&W --> Investors - SEC Filings - Smith & Wesson
    .
    Now, if you don't get it right your stock price plummets. Stock prices are entirely about earnings to share-price ratio and if you screw-up the numbers the public loses faith in your company. Down the crapper you go. And perhaps the quality of the product suffers in transition. One thing we know in business... it takes huge investments to move. So you do an alternative analysis. The numbers tell you when it's time to expand, relocate or fold. Successful businesses know their numbers cold.
    .
    Anyone can write some baseless argument on this post. But some of us have been in that world for our entire careers and understand the factors; financial, economic, social and socioeconomic. What's further, we don't relocate just because a state is treating people poorly. We're not in the humanitarian business. We're not in the charity business. We continue to generate revenues and profits and THAT is every company's objective. And when a company has a 50% jump in profits we do NOTHING to upset that. We're not in the second amendment business.
    .
    I can't imagine explaining to investors at a shareholder's meeting that I'm incurring $200 million in debt to relocate the company, not for economic reasons, but because the state we're operating in is unfriendly to our customers. This when we do business world-wide? If, upon completion, the relocation does not increase profitability or leaves us with unrealized depreciation and holding of dead real estate then it is not approved by any board. Nor by the shareholders. The board of directors of my own company would physically throw me into the street... followed by that little plant on my office window. Never disturb a well-oiled machine's function unless it's profitable.
    .
    This argument sounds like the occupy movement... like corporate America owes something to the public. We owe you nothing. Not even a job. If you don't like the way we do business than take your money elsewhere. I've always operated that way... successfully I might add.
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

  8. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by tattedupboy View Post
    Better to support an American company in an anti gun state than a foreign company. I don't see it as supporting a state's anti gun agenda as much as I see it going towards supporting American workers and American jobs.

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 4 Beta
    Those countries are not restricting the rights of fellow Americans, unlike California, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Illinois and a couple of other states. Do you support that also?

  9. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigrebnc1861 View Post
    Those countries are not restricting the rights of fellow Americans Do you support that also?
    If I buy a Ruger (made in the anti gun state of Connecticut) I'm at least supporting an American company that hires Americans who'll spend their money right here in America. If I buy a Desert Eagle or a Glock (both good guns, by the way), America can kiss that money goodbye. That's how I look at it.

    Sent from my A200 using Tapatalk HD
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

  10. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1 View Post
    Companies do it all the time when the numbers work. Otherwise they cease to exist.
    .
    When you've founded and been the CEO of a company doing $12-$14 million annually you can argue with me. The average publicly traded corporation doesn't have that kind of cash sitting around. They must raise the money from investment banks or release more stock in the public market to accomplish this. When you take-on debt your stock prices drop. Your earnings to share price ratio gets out of balance. people dump the stock fearing loss. Company net worth drops. When you've completed the move you must break-up and sell-of the assets that aren't able to be relocated such as manufacturing facilities and land. The real-estate DOES NOT SELL. You eat it. And then there's those pesky employee buyouts. HUGE bucks. Early retirement packages and severance payouts. This works well when the breakup value in an undervalued company exceeds it's operational value. It doesn't work when the company is highly profitable. Thus there's a huge loss.
    .
    Further, publicly traded companies must file an annual 10-K report to the Securities and Exchange Commission. This report provides information on past performance and assumptions regarding future fiscal condition. It encompasses such areas as risk factors, selected financials (balance sheet, equity statement, etc,) market risk, risk from legislative actions, assumptions on future expansion plans and costs, income statement, deferred costs... basically the financial condition of the company. Here's a link to S&W --> Investors - SEC Filings - Smith & Wesson
    .
    Now, if you don't get it right your stock price plummets. Stock prices are entirely about earnings to share-price ratio and if you screw-up the numbers the public loses faith in your company. Down the crapper you go. And perhaps the quality of the product suffers in transition. One thing we know in business... it takes huge investments to move. So you do an alternative analysis. The numbers tell you when it's time to expand, relocate or fold. Successful businesses know their numbers cold.
    .
    Anyone can write some baseless argument on this post. But some of us have been in that world for our entire careers and understand the factors; financial, economic, social and socioeconomic. What's further, we don't relocate just because a state is treating people poorly. We're not in the humanitarian business. We're not in the charity business. We continue to generate revenues and profits and THAT is every company's objective. And when a company has a 50% jump in profits we do NOTHING to upset that. We're not in the second amendment business.
    .
    I can't imagine explaining to investors at a shareholder's meeting that I'm incurring $200 million in debt to relocate the company, not for economic reasons, but because the state we're operating in is unfriendly to our customers. This when we do business world-wide? If, upon completion, the relocation does not increase profitability or leaves us with unrealized depreciation and holding of dead real estate then it is not approved by any board. Nor by the shareholders. The board of directors of my own company would physically throw me into the street... followed by that little plant on my office window. Never disturb a well-oiled machine's function unless it's profitable.
    .
    This argument sounds like the occupy movement... like corporate America owes something to the public. We owe you nothing. Not even a job. If you don't like the way we do business than take your money elsewhere. I've always operated that way... successfully I might add.
    I'll argue with you regardless I'll argue for the rights of other citizens unlike you arguing for the company, that doesn't give a damn about you if truth be told.

  11. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigrebnc1861 View Post
    I'll argue with you regardless I'll argue for the rights of other citizens unlike you arguing for the company, that doesn't give a damn about you if truth be told.
    I understand Reb, I really do. In principal is stinks but these corporate execs haven't had a passing relationship with principals since before they got their MBA.
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

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