Obama Tells Web Firms To Divulge Your Account Info And Passwords
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Thread: Obama Tells Web Firms To Divulge Your Account Info And Passwords

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    Obama Tells Web Firms To Divulge Your Account Info And Passwords

    Obama Tells Web Firms To Divulge Your Account Info And Passwords


    (CNET) The U.S. government has demanded that major Internet companies divulge users' stored passwords, according to two industry sources familiar with these orders, which represent an escalation in surveillance techniques that has not previously been disclosed.


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    Obama Tells Web Firms To Divulge Your Account Info And Passwords | America's Conservative News
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    The original CNET report doesn't mention the Obama administration at all. Conservative News apparently just assumes that. But the CNET article cites the Patriot Act and past requests for passwords, so the requests could have occurred anytime since the Patriot Act passed, including during the Bush administration.
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    It has to be more recent as to the court cases sited.

    The Justice Department has argued in court proceedings before that it has broad legal authority to obtain passwords. In 2011, for instance, federal prosecutors sent a grand jury subpoena demanding the password that would unlock files encrypted with the TrueCrypt utility.

    The Florida man who received the subpoena claimed the Fifth Amendment, which protects his right to avoid self-incrimination, allowed him to refuse the prosecutors' demand. In February 2012, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit agreed, saying that because prosecutors could bring a criminal prosecution against him based on the contents of the decrypted files, the man "could not be compelled to decrypt the drives."

    In January 2012, a federal district judge in Colorado reached the opposite conclusion, ruling that a criminal defendant could be compelled under the All Writs Act to type in the password that would unlock a Toshiba Satellite laptop.
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    Quote Originally Posted by S&W645 View Post
    It has to be more recent as to the court cases sited.
    You need the next paragraph after that:
    .
    Both of those cases, however, deal with criminal proceedings when the password holder is the target of an investigation -- and don't address when a hashed password is stored on the servers of a company that's an innocent third party.
    So those aren't cases like the topic of the article. They're just examples of the legal principle of whether or not the government can claim such a right. I wouldn't be a bit surprised if the Obama administration has done this. In fact, I'd be a little surprised if it wasn't them. I was just pointing out that the source article did not single them out as the title of this thread suggests. The source article doesn't identify any administration, and since it cites the Patriot Act as the root origin of this issue, it could conceivably have happened at any time since that act passed in 2001.
    Posterity: you will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it.--- John Quincy Adams
    Condensed Guide To Ohio Concealed Carry Laws

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