Principal needs schooled in the laws and the Constitution.
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Thread: Principal needs schooled in the laws and the Constitution.

  1. #1
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    Principal needs schooled in the laws and the Constitution.

    7th-graders suspended for playing with airsoft gun in own yard | Fox News His attitude is that of a rogue school system. I smell a lawsuit in 5, 4, 3, ...... .
    NRA Certified Pistol Instructor
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  3. #2
    I hope so. That was way beyond ridiculous. I could understand it if it'd been on school grounds, but not in the kid's own yard. I still wouldn't agree with it, but I could understand their reasoning then. Warped as it is.
    Do Not Meddle In The Affairs Of Dragons ~ For You Are Crunchy And Good With Ketchup

  4. #3
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    Times really have changed. In high school I was on the rifle team and trap shooting team. On days when we had practice, our firearms were kept in our hall lockers. And virtually all the farm kids who were able to drive went road hunting on the way to school. One never heard of a problem with firearms in school. Even later in the early 70's when I was teaching, the Jaycees held a BB gun competition for middle school kids on the local and state level. We practiced after school in the cafeteria. Now even pop tarts, fingers, and NRA t-shirts are considered to be a danger and worthy of suspension.

    What has changed? Even with the extreme firearm paranoia today, kids are in danger. There is O tolerance in schools; so there must be some factor responsible other than guns. I think that violent TV, movies, and video games contribute. Also a society and parents that refuse to teach morality and responsibility must share in the blame for this violent criminal culture in which we live. Also some of the insanely paranoid adults that we place in responsible positions in the education system must contribute to this climate of fear and violence.

  5. #4
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    Wow, just when you think you have heard it all....Schools have gone above and beyond in the stupid category. Law suit is correct, would love to see the public school system face some sort of repercussion due to stupid choices made by overly protective adults. Whats next, suspending kids for playing call of duty IN their homes? Schools authority is only ON school property, NOT the property of someone else. Keep us posted as you hear things.
    Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you, Jesus Christ and the American Soldier....One died for your soul; the other for your freedom.

  6. #5
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    Public School systems are nothing more than the indoctrination wing of a tyrannical government.


    I used to be a government-educated stooge. By the grace of God, I repent. -Robert Burris

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deanimator View Post
    [*]Don't be afraid to use sarcasm, mockery and humiliation. They don't respect you. There's no need to pretend you respect them.
    Operation Veterans Relief: http://www.opvr.org/home.html

  8. #7
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    Howdy,

    I graduated in 1982 and even then we were allowed to have hunting guns in our vehicle while on school property.

    My Jr year, winter of '81, I ran a trap line before and after school and would always have a loaded gun in my car at school. During hunting season the guys and girls that hunted would have everything from .22s to shotguns to bolt-action and semi-auto rifles in their vehicle.

    Heck, during one of the hunting seasons I used a H&K 91 and carried it in back seat of my car with at lest 2 - 20 round mags.

    The Principal, School Board, cops, everybody knew we had guns in our vehicles and no one cared.

    Things sure have changed.

    Nowadays I work as an multi-craft industrial maintenance tech and due to company rules I can NOT possess a pocketknife of any type because I might hurt myself or someone else.

    Paul
    I'm so Liberal that I work at the Bill and Hillary Clinton Regional Airport!

  9. #8
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    We made the conscious decision not to have kids before ever getting married, but if we did have any, I would never let them within 100 yards of a public school. I quit school when I was 16 and home-schooled myself well enough to apply math to the trade of being a Steelworker for six years plus another seven years outside of a union job hanging steel, and another seven years as a construction estimator. I hated math in school, until I had a reason to learn it; making a living. I loved history in school, but it wasn't until I started doing my own research about it that I found out how woefully lacking K-12 history is in substance or accuracy. And it's gotten much worse in the intervening years from everything I can gather.

    Having overseen my own education for more than 40 years, I decided to go get my GED in January of 2012. I enrolled in a local community college's adult education program for the GED test, and the first thing they did was "pre-test" me to see how much instruction I would need before testing for real. The counselor I had been talking to called me at home the day I took the test and told me I didn't need any instruction, I was ready then to test out. I told her that I wasn't at all comfortable with the science part of the test, and she said while that was my lowest-scoring portion, I scored an 88%, so when did I want her to schedule me for the real test? Took the test about three weeks later and passed in the top one percentile of the entire country. I've had a little instruction over the years. Went to a trade school for construction estimation for eight months, but that's about it. Imagine what heights of learning I could achieve with instructors who made learning interesting and challenging. I was so bored in high school that I felt like I learned more by ditching and going to the beach to study the patterns of waves coming in as I was sitting on my board waiting for a good one to catch.

    I honestly cannot fathom how any parent could send their kids to the indoctrination centers known as public schools. Well, I guess if the parents ascribe to the ideology that those centers indoctrinate their kids with, then I could understand, but otherwise, I honestly don't get it. Unless the parents themselves lacked the self-awareness and testicular fortitude necessary to prevent their own indoctrination, then any thinking parent should be able to see what is happening to their kids. Stories like this one are common enough that it should be obvious how widespread the idiocy in schools is. I hope at least the parents of Khalid get it now, but even that seems like wishful thinking these days. It is indeed shocking what level of their own bondage people will accept as "normal" or acceptable in something we once proudly proclaimed was a "free country." It certainly isn't that anymore.

    Blues
    No one has ever heard me say that I "hate" cops, because I don't. This is why I will never trust one again though: You just never know...

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluesStringer View Post
    We made the conscious decision not to have kids before ever getting married, but if we did have any, I would never let them within 100 yards of a public school. I quit school when I was 16 and home-schooled myself well enough to apply math to the trade of being a Steelworker for six years plus another seven years outside of a union job hanging steel, and another seven years as a construction estimator. I hated math in school, until I had a reason to learn it; making a living. I loved history in school, but it wasn't until I started doing my own research about it that I found out how woefully lacking K-12 history is in substance or accuracy. And it's gotten much worse in the intervening years from everything I can gather.

    Having overseen my own education for more than 40 years, I decided to go get my GED in January of 2012. I enrolled in a local community college's adult education program for the GED test, and the first thing they did was "pre-test" me to see how much instruction I would need before testing for real. The counselor I had been talking to called me at home the day I took the test and told me I didn't need any instruction, I was ready then to test out. I told her that I wasn't at all comfortable with the science part of the test, and she said while that was my lowest-scoring portion, I scored an 88%, so when did I want her to schedule me for the real test? Took the test about three weeks later and passed in the top one percentile of the entire country. I've had a little instruction over the years. Went to a trade school for construction estimation for eight months, but that's about it. Imagine what heights of learning I could achieve with instructors who made learning interesting and challenging. I was so bored in high school that I felt like I learned more by ditching and going to the beach to study the patterns of waves coming in as I was sitting on my board waiting for a good one to catch.

    I honestly cannot fathom how any parent could send their kids to the indoctrination centers known as public schools. Well, I guess if the parents ascribe to the ideology that those centers indoctrinate their kids with, then I could understand, but otherwise, I honestly don't get it. Unless the parents themselves lacked the self-awareness and testicular fortitude necessary to prevent their own indoctrination, then any thinking parent should be able to see what is happening to their kids. Stories like this one are common enough that it should be obvious how widespread the idiocy in schools is. I hope at least the parents of Khalid get it now, but even that seems like wishful thinking these days. It is indeed shocking what level of their own bondage people will accept as "normal" or acceptable in something we once proudly proclaimed was a "free country." It certainly isn't that anymore.

    Blues
    Blues,

    I have considered you one of the more eloquent and educated members on this forum. Education is not something that you can put on a piece of paper, place in a nice frame and hang on the wall. All this shows, is that you met some minimum requirement of someone's expectations. Education is embracing a subject, it's tearing it apart, it's diving in with both feet and immersing yourself in the matter to understand. In other words, it is an active process that cannot be done without an active mind. Blues, you have that kind of mind, which is why you have been able to succeed through life.

    As you know, I am a public school teacher. I have heard some of these bizarre and idiotic stories and it slays me that some people can be so stupid. (Poptart looks like a gun, you are wearing a T-shirt we don't like, you shot a toy in your yard, etc.) These stories make me wince and almost want to hide from the limelight of public teaching. I also heard from one of our history teachers that our Superintendent called down to the department head of Social Studies and wanted specific details on what the teachers were going to be doing and saying on Constitution Day. This infuriated me... it's one 40 minute class, when these teachers spend weeks going over the Constitution. Now, this Superintendent gets involved on a special day and wants to micro-manage it?

    However, I have also seen the other side. I have seen when parents work together with the teachers and do hold the students accountable, and the students feed on their successes and start to have a positive outlook on education, what it can do for them and how they can apply it in their life. When this happens it gets the juices flowing as a teacher. However in the combined 45 years my wife and I have been teaching, I'm seeing the collaboration between parent, teacher, and administration become less and less. It saddens me that this is happening.

    Blues, you know we too, do not have children. We have spoken often and have admitted that with her talents in music and creative thought and with my talents with working with my hands, engineering, math and physics, added to our love and desire to study the Bible, we would have been able to home-school some pretty great kids. If we had them, this is exactly what we would have done.

    A sad testimony of a public school teacher,
    Wolf
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluesStringer View Post
    We made the conscious decision not to have kids before ever getting married, but if we did have any, I would never let them within 100 yards of a public school. I quit school when I was 16 and home-schooled myself well enough to apply math to the trade of being a Steelworker for six years plus another seven years outside of a union job hanging steel, and another seven years as a construction estimator. I hated math in school, until I had a reason to learn it; making a living. I loved history in school, but it wasn't until I started doing my own research about it that I found out how woefully lacking K-12 history is in substance or accuracy. And it's gotten much worse in the intervening years from everything I can gather.

    Having overseen my own education for more than 40 years, I decided to go get my GED in January of 2012. I enrolled in a local community college's adult education program for the GED test, and the first thing they did was "pre-test" me to see how much instruction I would need before testing for real. The counselor I had been talking to called me at home the day I took the test and told me I didn't need any instruction, I was ready then to test out. I told her that I wasn't at all comfortable with the science part of the test, and she said while that was my lowest-scoring portion, I scored an 88%, so when did I want her to schedule me for the real test? Took the test about three weeks later and passed in the top one percentile of the entire country. I've had a little instruction over the years. Went to a trade school for construction estimation for eight months, but that's about it. Imagine what heights of learning I could achieve with instructors who made learning interesting and challenging. I was so bored in high school that I felt like I learned more by ditching and going to the beach to study the patterns of waves coming in as I was sitting on my board waiting for a good one to catch.

    I honestly cannot fathom how any parent could send their kids to the indoctrination centers known as public schools. Well, I guess if the parents ascribe to the ideology that those centers indoctrinate their kids with, then I could understand, but otherwise, I honestly don't get it. Unless the parents themselves lacked the self-awareness and testicular fortitude necessary to prevent their own indoctrination, then any thinking parent should be able to see what is happening to their kids. Stories like this one are common enough that it should be obvious how widespread the idiocy in schools is. I hope at least the parents of Khalid get it now, but even that seems like wishful thinking these days. It is indeed shocking what level of their own bondage people will accept as "normal" or acceptable in something we once proudly proclaimed was a "free country." It certainly isn't that anymore.

    Blues
    Blues, that happens to too many students. They get bored in class because they have to dumb the classes down to allow the lowest denominator student to pass. My worst classes in HS were the ones where I got bored. And it wasn't because I was a dumb student. I took classes that were designed for students one or two years ahead of my grade level to keep from being bored. And still got the same grades as the higher grade students. Example being taking chemistry in the 10th grade with Juniors and Seniors. And in our school, there were only 20 10th graders who did it among a group of about 900 chemistry students that year. Same with math classes. I got bored in class and played chess on paper with the student behind me. And both of us were A students.
    NRA Certified Pistol Instructor
    NRA Certified RSO
    Normal is an illusion. What is normal to the spider is chaos to the fly.

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