Feds Say Possession of “Large Amounts” of Weapons May Indicate Terrorist Activity
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: Feds Say Possession of “Large Amounts” of Weapons May Indicate Terrorist Activity

  1. #1

    Feds Say Possession of “Large Amounts” of Weapons May Indicate Terrorist Activity

    Feds Say Possession of “Large Amounts” of Weapons May Indicate Terrorist Activity
    A joint bulletin issued in early August by the Department of Homeland Security and FBI warns state and local law enforcement agencies to look out for people in possession of “large amounts” of weapons and ammunition, describing the discovery of “unusual amounts” of weapons as a potential indicator of criminal or terrorist activity.
    Citing the example of Norwegian mass-murderer Anders Behring Breivik, who reportedly “stockpiled approximately 12,000 pounds of precursors, weapons, and armor and hid them underground in remote, wooded locations,” the bulletin instructs law enforcement to look for “large amounts of weapons, ammunition, explosives, accelerants, or explosive precursor chemicals” that “could indicate pre-operational terrorist attack planning or criminal activity.” Weapons do not have to be “cached” in remote locations to meet the standard for suspicious activity. According to the bulletin, weapons could be stored in an “individual’s home, storage facility, or vehicle” and may include common firearms such as “rifles, shotguns, pistols” as well as “military grade weapons.” The illegal possession of large amounts of ammunition is also listed as a potential indicator of “criminal weapons possession related to terrorism.” While the bulletin never clarifies what constitutes a “large” or “unusual” quantity of weapons or ammunition, it does say that such a quantity would “arouse suspicion in a reasonable person.”
    The joint DHS-FBI Roll Call Release distributed to police, first responders and private security throughout the U.S. is part of a series of bulletins describing activities “reasonably indicative of criminal activity associated with terrorism.” The suspicious activities described in the bulletins are derived from criteria in the Information Sharing Environment (ISE) Functional Standard for Suspicious Activity Reporting signed in 2009. The ISE Functional Standard governs the collection of information for the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative (NSI), an interagency program to collect suspicious activity reports from law enforcement agencies around the country. Other bulletins in the series focus on everything from surveillance and theft to photography and even “eliciting information,” an activity described as “questioning individuals at a level beyond mere curiosity.”
    Like other bulletins in the DHS-FBI series on suspicious activity reporting, the document notes that “constitutional activities should not be reported” unless the circumstances “support the source agency’s suspicion that the behavior observed is not innocent, but rather reasonably indicative of criminal activity associated with terrorism, including evidence of pre-operational planning related to terrorism.” However, no guidance is provided on potential legal issues related to the reporting of constitutionally-protected activities.
    A joint bulletin issued in early August by the Department of Homeland Security and FBI warns state and local law enforcement agencies to look out for people in possession of “large amounts” of weapons and ammunition, describing the discovery of “unusual amounts” of weapons as a potential indicator of criminal or terrorist activity.
    Citing the example of Norwegian mass-murderer Anders Behring Breivik, who reportedly “stockpiled approximately 12,000 pounds of precursors, weapons, and armor and hid them underground in remote, wooded locations,” the bulletin instructs law enforcement to look for “large amounts of weapons, ammunition, explosives, accelerants, or explosive precursor chemicals” that “could indicate pre-operational terrorist attack planning or criminal activity.” Weapons do not have to be “cached” in remote locations to meet the standard for suspicious activity. According to the bulletin, weapons could be stored in an “individual’s home, storage facility, or vehicle” and may include common firearms such as “rifles, shotguns, pistols” as well as “military grade weapons.” The illegal possession of large amounts of ammunition is also listed as a potential indicator of “criminal weapons possession related to terrorism.” While the bulletin never clarifies what constitutes a “large” or “unusual” quantity of weapons or ammunition, it does say that such a quantity would “arouse suspicion in a reasonable person.”
    The joint DHS-FBI Roll Call Release distributed to police, first responders and private security throughout the U.S. is part of a series of bulletins describing activities “reasonably indicative of criminal activity associated with terrorism.” The suspicious activities described in the bulletins are derived from criteria in the Information Sharing Environment (ISE) Functional Standard for Suspicious Activity Reporting signed in 2009. The ISE Functional Standard governs the collection of information for the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative (NSI), an interagency program to collect suspicious activity reports from law enforcement agencies around the country. Other bulletins in the series focus on everything from surveillance and theft to photography and even “eliciting information,” an activity described as “questioning individuals at a level beyond mere curiosity.”
    Feds Say Possession of ?Large Amounts? of Weapons May Indicate Terrorist Activity | Public Intelligence
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  2.   
  3. Last I knew, there is no law regulating the number of weapons I can own or the amount of Ammo I can keep. So maybe we should be looking at the Feds as terrorists. They have a large stockpile of weapons and ammo. Just sayin!!!!

  4. #3
    I agree, although I've read that there have been a local police department that had taken away a man's gun collection stating that they were doing so at the request of DHS for some stupid reason like, the man's son who was a felon and could get ahold of some of his gun's, I know it's really a bunch of BS, but it does happen, sad as it is.
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  5. #4
    The D.C. Gun Raid You Won’t Believe with an Ending You Might Not Be Able to Stomach
    By: Dave Urbanski
    When more than 30 police officers in full tactical gear descended upon the house of a successful Washington, D.C., businessman with no criminal record last summer, they were looking for “firearms and ammunition … gun cleaning equipment, holsters, bullet holders and ammunition receipts,” The Washington Times reported.

    D.C. Businessman Mark Witaschek Faces 2 Years in Jail for Possessing Unregistered Ammunition
    Mark Witaschek. (Image source: The Washington Times)

    But what did police find after they shut down the streets for blocks around Mark Witaschek’s Georgetown home, broke down a bathroom door with a battering ram and pulled his 16-year-old son out of the shower naked, pointed guns at the heads of Witaschek and his girlfriend, handcuffed them and then “tossed the place” for two hours?

    Very little, according to the Times’ Emily Miller:
    •“One live round of 12-gauge shotgun ammunition” — actually an inoperable shell that misfired during a hunt years earlier that Witaschek kept as a souvenir.
    •“One handgun holster” — perfectly legal.
    •“One expended round of .270 caliber ammunition” — a spent brass casing.
    •“One box of Knight bullets for reloading,” according to police notation on the warrant. Except, Miller reveals, they aren’t for reloading — they’re for antique-replica, single-shot, muzzle-loading rifles.

    And after all that, in the wake of a raid which Witaschek estimates resulted in $10,000 damage to his house, he faces two years in prison for possession of unregistered ammunition, the Times reported.

    D.C. law requires residents to register every firearm with police, and only registered gun owners can possess ammunition, which includes spent shells and casings. The maximum penalty for violating these laws is a $1,000 fine and a year in jail, the Times noted.

    While Witaschek has never had a firearm in Washington, D.C., Miller wrote that he’s being “prosecuted to the full extent of the law.” The trial starts Nov. 4.


    .

    More from the Times:


    This was the second police search of his home. Exactly one month earlier, Witaschek allowed members of the “Gun Recovery Unit” access to search without a warrant because he thought he had nothing to hide.

    After about an hour and a half, the police found one box of Winchester .40 caliber ammunition, one gun-cleaning kit (fully legal) and a Civil War-era Colt antique revolver that Witaschek kept on his office desk. The police seized the Colt even though antique firearms are legal and do not have to be registered.

    Witaschek is a gun owner and an avid hunter. However, he stores his firearms at the home of his sister, Sylvia Witaschek, in suburban Arlington, Va.

    Two weeks after the June raid, D.C. police investigators went to his sister’s house — unaccompanied by Virginia police and without a warrant — and asked to “view” the firearms, according to a police report. She refused. The next day, the D.C. police returned to her house with the Arlington County police and served her with a criminal subpoena.

    The Office of Attorney General of the District of Columbia Irvin Nathan signed an affidavit on Aug. 21, 2012, in support of a warrant to arrest Witaschek. A spokesman for Nathan would not comment on a pending case. [...]

    In September 2012, the attorney general offered Witaschek a deal to plead guilty to one charge of unlawful possession of ammunition with a penalty of a year of probation, a $500 fine and a contribution to a victims’ fund.

    Witaschek turned down the offer. “It’s the principle,” he told me.
    The D.C. Gun Raid You Won?t Believe with an Ending You Might Not Be Able to Stomach | TheBlaze.com
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    north east Iowa
    Posts
    1,250
    This is exactly the type of repression and violence that one can expect in police state. So this must be what our government has become. I guess that we owe our thanks to the idiot voters who believed Obama and twice voted for a Marxist dictator in the making.

  7. #6
    Anyone with a progressive reloading machine (Dillon 550=400 rounds an hour easily), anyone with a decent range “Appetite”, a Glock, 1911 and an AR would have a minimum of 1,000 primers for large pistol, small pistol and small rifle. Anyone who has children with the aforementioned dreaded guns and who relies on dad or granddad for ammo will have these. A good range day for me is 200 at a minimum.
    "Undocumented Second Amendment Supporter, fighting against suppression of mandatory background checks."

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    TN, the patron state of shootin stuff
    Posts
    1,399
    Quote Originally Posted by buckey01 View Post
    This is exactly the type of repression and violence that one can expect in police state. So this must be what our government has become. I guess that we owe our thanks to the idiot voters who believed Obama and twice voted for a Marxist dictator in the making.
    As much as I would like to blame the whole mess on Obama and he is responsible for some of it, there are others to blame as well. A few that come to mind are: DHS, CIA, BATF, TSA, Liberal Media, Janet Reno, Congress, and the list goes on. When the SHTF we will have no one to blame but ourselves for allowing these things to happen.
    Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress;
    but I repeat myself.
    Mark Twain

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Houston Metro Area, Texas
    Posts
    3,004
    Anyone entering my home without my permission, will be considered a trespasser and a thief.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    north east Iowa
    Posts
    1,250
    Quote Originally Posted by BigSlick View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by buckey01 View Post
    This is exactly the type of repression and violence that one can expect in police state. So this must be what our government has become. I guess that we owe our thanks to the idiot voters who believed Obama and twice voted for a Marxist dictator in the making.
    As much as I would like to blame the whole mess on Obama and he is responsible for some of it, there are others to blame as well. A few that come to mind are: DHS, CIA, BATF, TSA, Liberal Media, Janet Reno, Congress, and the list goes on. When the SHTF we will have no one to blame but ourselves for allowing these things to happen.
    I never said that Obama is totally responsible. There is plenty of blame to go around in Washington. There are progressives in both parties. In fact in Washington it would be far easier to name those not responsible for the damage being done to this country. Those not guilty of the destruction of the Constitution and this one time republic are outnumbered in Washington by at least 100 to 1. It is only that Obama is the culmination of all the evil of progressivism and the one trying to bring about the final destruction of individual liberty in this country.

  11. #10
    What is the definition of "large amounts of weapons"? I have never had as many as I wanted but nearly enough to get me divorced a couple of times.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast