If you want to know how to ruin a state, look no further than California. - Page 2
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  1. #11
    From Bloomburg News
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...ntent=business

    U.S. Posts Biggest Budget Deficit Since 2012
    By:Sarah McGregor
    March 12, 2018, 3:17 PM EDT

    The U.S. recorded a $215 billion budget deficit in February -- its biggest in six years -- as revenue declined.

    Fiscal income dropped to $156 billion, down 9 percent from a year earlier, while spending rose 2 percent to $371 billion, the Treasury Department said on Monday. The deficit for the fiscal year that began in October widened to $391 billion, compared with a $351 billion shortfall the same period a year earlier, according to the Treasury report.

    The data underscore concerns by some economists that Republican tax cuts enacted this year could increase the U.S. government debt load, which has surpassed $20 trillion. The tax changes are expected to reduce federal revenue by more than $1 trillion over the next decade, while a $300 billion spending deal reached by Congress in February could push the deficit higher.

    Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has said the tax cuts will pay for themselves through faster economic growth.

    A combination of higher income tax refunds and a drop in the withholding of individual income and payroll taxes led to the reduction in receipts, according to an analysis by the Congressional Budget Office released last week.

    “Increases in wages and salaries were more than offset by a decline in the share of wages withheld for taxes,” the CBO said. That trend reflects new guidance issued in January by the Internal Revenue Service over how much of employees’ paychecks should be withheld based on the new tax rules, according to the CBO.

    The deficit in February was also impacted by the timing of certain payments, CBO said.

    Like I said, Republicans don't believe the Debt or Budget Deficits are bad anymore.

  2.   
  3. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by niceshootintex View Post
    San Jose Mercury News. Same survey is also in USA Today, Business Insider etc...
    CA is 50th in Quality of Life as of this 1 March 2018 publication date.

    I was thinking it was anecdotal on my part because I bailed and all my friends and relatives there are clawing to get out. Its not, it's getting worse everyday, and unless you're in SF tech, it's not good for the majority of folks. I do know they are in top 3 states for population exodus also with Illinois being number one.

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2018/02/...fe-study-says/

    Sent from my XT1650 using USA Carry mobile app
    There’s a rumor that a lot of the businesses in Silicon Valley are themselves looking at moving to another state because of all the problems in CA and if they go, they better not try to rent a U-Haul, the prices to rent one from CA to say Nevada is around $1,300 one way and the costs to go the other way is just over $285, that should tell you something.
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  4. #13
    Speaking of California, another piece from Bloomburg

    https://www.bloomberg.com/view/artic..._medium=social

    California Leads U.S. Economy, Away From Trump
    Whatever the president says, this state does the opposite. It's working.
    May 10, 2017, 5:00 AM EDT
    By Matthew Winkler

    To justify his executive orders nullifying policies protecting people from climate change, hazardous working conditions and persecution because of their religion or citizenship status, President Donald Trump during a Feb. 16 press conference said: "To be honest, I inherited a mess. It's a mess. Jobs are pouring out of the country." He later told the Conservative Political Action Conference that regulations are "crushing our economy."

    That's a claim worth exploring. Look at California, which is one-eighth of the U.S. population with 39 million people and one-seventh of the nation's gross domestic product of $2.3 trillion. Far from being a mess, California's economy is bigger than ever, rivaling the U.K. as No. 5 in the world, when figures for 2016 are officially tabulated.

    California is the chief reason America is the only developed economy to achieve record GDP growth since the financial crisis of 2008 and ensuing global recession, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Much of the U.S. growth can be traced to California laws promoting clean energy, government accountability and protections for undocumented people. Governor Jerry Brown, now in his fourth term, considers immigrants a major reason for the state's success: "39 percent of us are Latino and the majority are from Mexico," he said in a March 2 interview in his Sacramento office.

    In the stock and bond markets, where investors show no allegiance to political parties, California has outperformed the rest of the U.S. the past five years, especially since the Nov. 9 election, when Trump became the fifth person to win the Electoral College and lose the popular vote. California's creditworthiness keeps getting better, measured by the declining premium global investors must pay to ensure against depreciation of the state's debt obligations. That premium has diminished more than for any other state since 2012, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. California, whose voters favored Hillary Clinton two to one, outperformed Treasury bonds since the November election. Texas, which is the second-largest state in population and which supported Trump, became cheaper compared to Treasuries and California in the market for state and local debt since the November election. Investors see security in the state with more protections for immigrants and more regulations.

    California's borrowing cost is 0.15 percentage points lower than the average for states and municipalities and has declined to just 0.24 percentage points more than the U.S. pays on its debt, down from 1.97 percentage points in 2013.

    At the same time, bonds sold by California's municipalities produced a total return of 2.3 percent since November, outperforming the benchmark for the U.S., according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The growing popularity of bonds sold by California issuers is a consequence of the state's more rigorous regulation of the market, specifically legislation signed by Brown last year, creating greater transparency and accountability for issuers of California debt.

    No state or country has created as many laws discouraging fossil fuels and carbon while promoting clean energy. That convergence of policy and voter preference is paying off in the stock market.

    California is home to 20 of the 130 companies in North America and South America that meet the standard classification of clean energy. These 20 companies produced a total return of 45 percent during the past 12 months, beating the clean energy benchmark's 13 percent, the S&P 500's 19 percent and the S&P 500 Energy Index's 6 percent.

    California clean energy companies reported annual revenue growth of 26 percent, almost three times the benchmark, and they turned more revenue into profit with an average gross margin of 46 percent, compared to 41 percent for the benchmark. California companies also spent 13 percent of their revenue on research and development compared to 8 percent for the benchmark. Jobs at clean energy companies in California increased 14 percent last year, double the average rate for the industry. Analysts surveyed by Bloomberg say these 20 stocks will gain only 1 percent during the next 12 months, because they achieved their target valuations much sooner than predicted. Tesla Inc., the Palo Alto-based manufacturer of electric vehicles, appreciated 60 percent since Trump's election and is now worth more than $50 billion, greater than Ford Motor Co.'s $45 billion market capitalization and almost as much as General Motors Co.

    "We have a goal of a million and a half electric vehicles by 2025 and that's quite a steep curve to get there," Brown said in the interview in March. "No matter what Trump says, China, the world, the academies of science and all the major countries have all recognized climate change. Certainly, businesses acknowledge they have to make these investments. California is well on its way."

    Technology driving the clean energy boom is the reason California companies lead most of their peers in U.S. The 467 California-based firms in the Russell 3000 Index produced a total return of 185 percent since 2012, easily surpassing the 94 percent for the index, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Analysts also are more bullish on companies in California than the rest of the U.S., predicting a 12-month average total return 12 percent (income plus appreciation) versus 9 percent, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

    Behind such a favorable outlook is the diversity of the California economy, which grew $42.3 billion during the first three quarters last year. That's almost as much as the next two fastest-growing states, New York and Florida, combined.

    California's revenue from agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting totaled $39 billion in 2015, plus $279 billion from manufacturing. The trailing 12-month revenue from California technology companies is $720 billion, or 54 percent of the U.S. industry, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

    The capitalist juggernaut that is California helps explain why the state's per capita income increased 9.5 percent since 2015, the most of any state and the most since 2012, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Far from losing jobs overseas, California keeps creating them with an unemployment rate declining to 4.9 percent from 5.7 percent in 2016, faster than the national average.

    None of this is lost on the residents of California. They are proudly enacting policies in opposition to Trump's. The legislature became the first to vote to become a sanctuary state, and supported raising gas taxes and vehicle registration fees to improve infrastructure. While Trump gets the lowest approval of any new president after 100 days and the Republican Congress does worse, the politics of California are the opposite. A recent University of California Berkeley Institute of Government Studies poll found 57 percent of California's registered voters approve of the legislature's job performance. Brown gets 61 percent approval.

    If that's a "mess," Trump could only hope for more of it.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by S&W29 View Post
    Speaking of California, another piece from Bloomburg

    https://www.bloomberg.com/view/artic..._medium=social

    California Leads U.S. Economy, Away From Trump
    Whatever the president says, this state does the opposite. It's working.
    May 10, 2017, 5:00 AM EDT
    By Matthew Winkler

    To justify his executive orders nullifying policies protecting people from climate change, hazardous working conditions and persecution because of their religion or citizenship status, President Donald Trump during a Feb. 16 press conference said: "To be honest, I inherited a mess. It's a mess. Jobs are pouring out of the country." He later told the Conservative Political Action Conference that regulations are "crushing our economy."

    That's a claim worth exploring. Look at California, which is one-eighth of the U.S. population with 39 million people and one-seventh of the nation's gross domestic product of $2.3 trillion. Far from being a mess, California's economy is bigger than ever, rivaling the U.K. as No. 5 in the world, when figures for 2016 are officially tabulated.

    California is the chief reason America is the only developed economy to achieve record GDP growth since the financial crisis of 2008 and ensuing global recession, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Much of the U.S. growth can be traced to California laws promoting clean energy, government accountability and protections for undocumented people. Governor Jerry Brown, now in his fourth term, considers immigrants a major reason for the state's success: "39 percent of us are Latino and the majority are from Mexico," he said in a March 2 interview in his Sacramento office.

    In the stock and bond markets, where investors show no allegiance to political parties, California has outperformed the rest of the U.S. the past five years, especially since the Nov. 9 election, when Trump became the fifth person to win the Electoral College and lose the popular vote. California's creditworthiness keeps getting better, measured by the declining premium global investors must pay to ensure against depreciation of the state's debt obligations. That premium has diminished more than for any other state since 2012, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. California, whose voters favored Hillary Clinton two to one, outperformed Treasury bonds since the November election. Texas, which is the second-largest state in population and which supported Trump, became cheaper compared to Treasuries and California in the market for state and local debt since the November election. Investors see security in the state with more protections for immigrants and more regulations.

    California's borrowing cost is 0.15 percentage points lower than the average for states and municipalities and has declined to just 0.24 percentage points more than the U.S. pays on its debt, down from 1.97 percentage points in 2013.

    At the same time, bonds sold by California's municipalities produced a total return of 2.3 percent since November, outperforming the benchmark for the U.S., according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The growing popularity of bonds sold by California issuers is a consequence of the state's more rigorous regulation of the market, specifically legislation signed by Brown last year, creating greater transparency and accountability for issuers of California debt.

    No state or country has created as many laws discouraging fossil fuels and carbon while promoting clean energy. That convergence of policy and voter preference is paying off in the stock market.

    California is home to 20 of the 130 companies in North America and South America that meet the standard classification of clean energy. These 20 companies produced a total return of 45 percent during the past 12 months, beating the clean energy benchmark's 13 percent, the S&P 500's 19 percent and the S&P 500 Energy Index's 6 percent.

    California clean energy companies reported annual revenue growth of 26 percent, almost three times the benchmark, and they turned more revenue into profit with an average gross margin of 46 percent, compared to 41 percent for the benchmark. California companies also spent 13 percent of their revenue on research and development compared to 8 percent for the benchmark. Jobs at clean energy companies in California increased 14 percent last year, double the average rate for the industry. Analysts surveyed by Bloomberg say these 20 stocks will gain only 1 percent during the next 12 months, because they achieved their target valuations much sooner than predicted. Tesla Inc., the Palo Alto-based manufacturer of electric vehicles, appreciated 60 percent since Trump's election and is now worth more than $50 billion, greater than Ford Motor Co.'s $45 billion market capitalization and almost as much as General Motors Co.

    "We have a goal of a million and a half electric vehicles by 2025 and that's quite a steep curve to get there," Brown said in the interview in March. "No matter what Trump says, China, the world, the academies of science and all the major countries have all recognized climate change. Certainly, businesses acknowledge they have to make these investments. California is well on its way."

    Technology driving the clean energy boom is the reason California companies lead most of their peers in U.S. The 467 California-based firms in the Russell 3000 Index produced a total return of 185 percent since 2012, easily surpassing the 94 percent for the index, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Analysts also are more bullish on companies in California than the rest of the U.S., predicting a 12-month average total return 12 percent (income plus appreciation) versus 9 percent, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

    Behind such a favorable outlook is the diversity of the California economy, which grew $42.3 billion during the first three quarters last year. That's almost as much as the next two fastest-growing states, New York and Florida, combined.

    California's revenue from agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting totaled $39 billion in 2015, plus $279 billion from manufacturing. The trailing 12-month revenue from California technology companies is $720 billion, or 54 percent of the U.S. industry, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

    The capitalist juggernaut that is California helps explain why the state's per capita income increased 9.5 percent since 2015, the most of any state and the most since 2012, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Far from losing jobs overseas, California keeps creating them with an unemployment rate declining to 4.9 percent from 5.7 percent in 2016, faster than the national average.

    None of this is lost on the residents of California. They are proudly enacting policies in opposition to Trump's. The legislature became the first to vote to become a sanctuary state, and supported raising gas taxes and vehicle registration fees to improve infrastructure. While Trump gets the lowest approval of any new president after 100 days and the Republican Congress does worse, the politics of California are the opposite. A recent University of California Berkeley Institute of Government Studies poll found 57 percent of California's registered voters approve of the legislature's job performance. Brown gets 61 percent approval.

    If that's a "mess," Trump could only hope for more of it.
    Is Bloomburg a town somewhere If you want to know how to ruin a state, look no further than California...?

    Quality of life is multiple measurements of various conditions that affect QOL. Economy has almost no real bearing or impact on the middle class who can expect nothing more than giving more to their state and paying more every year to live there. There is little upward mobility in a caste system.

    California is rapidly approaching a two class system. The über rich and their indentured servants. You are correct in that the state of CA and the elites will continue to flourish. They'll toss an orange peel out of the window of their Maybach on their way to Yoga as you peer out of the window of your dingy $2,800 a month apartment wondering if you can afford enough gas to go get stuck in traffic.

    If you're OK with that as your future then there's a name for that. I lived there for various periods over decades and have many friends and family there so I'm not some person speaking out of turn. It's undergone a radical transformation in four decades and wrap your mind around the number 13.3%. That's the current tax out of any personal income you receive, it's the highest in the nation, and they want to raise it again next year.

    Money can't buy happiness but it surely can't if it's never going to be yours.

    Sent from my XT1650 using USA Carry mobile app

  6. #15
    It's really sad how much effort Ops putting into his anger about things he is totally powerless to change, or even affect even in the slightest. Obviously there is nothing in his life that gives him more satisfaction than screaming at democrats from his bunker, a sad and lonely existence driven by fake news sites and a buffoon of a president.
    “Religion is an insult to human dignity. Without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things.
    But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.” ― Steven Weinberg

  7. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by niceshootintex View Post
    Is Bloomburg a town somewhere If you want to know how to ruin a state, look no further than California...?

    Quality of life is multiple measurements of various conditions that affect QOL. Economy has almost no real bearing or impact on the middle class who can expect nothing more than giving more to their state and paying more every year to live there. There is little upward mobility in a caste system.

    California is rapidly approaching a two class system. The über rich and their indentured servants. You are correct in that the state of CA and the elites will continue to flourish. They'll toss an orange peel out of the window of their Maybach on their way to Yoga as you peer out of the window of your dingy $2,800 a month apartment wondering if you can afford enough gas to go get stuck in traffic.

    If you're OK with that as your future then there's a name for that. I lived there for various periods over decades and have many friends and family there so I'm not some person speaking out of turn. It's undergone a radical transformation in four decades and wrap your mind around the number 13.3%. That's the current tax out of any personal income you receive, it's the highest in the nation, and they want to raise it again next year.

    Money can't buy happiness but it surely can't if it's never going to be yours.

    Sent from my XT1650 using USA Carry mobile app
    Yes, housing prices are one of the biggest problems in CA, along with the gap in wealth, and the cost of living. However, that problem is nationwide. There is literally nowhere you can live in the US and make the current federal minimum wage and earn enough with 1 40 hour a week job to make the median rent on a 2 bedroom apartment. At least CA sees the problem and tries to do something about it. Meanwhile in other states, they refuse to raise the minimum wage and are doing everything they can through "Right to work" laws to bust unions and prevent collective bargaining to address things like the wage gap. As a result the neoconservative efforts to undermine wages, benefits, and secure retirement are bearing the fruit....to the benefit of a few and the detriment of many, and it will only get worse.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by S&W29 View Post
    Yes, housing prices are one of the biggest problems in CA, along with the gap in wealth, and the cost of living. However, that problem is nationwide. There is literally nowhere you can live in the US and make the current federal minimum wage and earn enough with 1 40 hour a week job to make the median rent on a 2 bedroom apartment. At least CA sees the problem and tries to do something about it. Meanwhile in other states, they refuse to raise the minimum wage and are doing everything they can through "Right to work" laws to bust unions and prevent collective bargaining to address things like the wage gap. As a result the neoconservative efforts to undermine wages, benefits, and secure retirement are bearing the fruit....to the benefit of a few and the detriment of many, and it will only get worse.
    CA has almost 30% of all homeless people in the United States. It's no accident. Yes, it's warm, they have a lot of drugs, and they don't do much when people become squatters on public land so it's a magnet. It's also because they have a lower middle class that go from a home to the streets in one unexpected job action or unanticipated bill. There are a lot of people in that number who are without shelter for a plethora of reasons that have nothing to with wage rates.

    A higher minimum wage being an answer to any of these problems is not any answer at all. They don't have to pay minimum wage in CA. They have an entire population of illegal immigrants to poach dirt cheap labor from. Go to any restaurant or see any landscaping crew in Cali. People working hard for less than minimum wage in most cases.

    Sent from my XT1650 using USA Carry mobile app

  9. #18
    Democrat DISASTER: California Named the Poverty Capital of America
    .
    By Scott Osborn
    .
    As Jerry Brown leaves the governor’s mansion, he leaves California in utter chaos, specifically an out of control homeless and poverty catastrophe.
    .
    Liberals have destroyed California. They claim to be making life fair for everyone, and as always, it backfired.
    .
    This week, State Assembly Republican Leader Chad Mayes called poverty California’s No. 1 priority during a forum of legislative leaders in Sacramento.
    .
    Democrat DISASTER: California Named the Poverty Capital of America
    .
    Mayes, who represents parts of San Bernardino and Riverside counties, claimed the state’s poverty rate is higher than any state in the nation when considering factors such as cost-of-living.
    .
    “If you look at the official poverty measure in California, we’re about average with the rest of the country,” Mayes said. “But if you use the supplemental poverty measure, we are in the lead. We have the highest poverty rate in the nation — higher than New Mexico, higher than any of the southern states, Louisiana, Alabama, higher than Idaho.”
    .
    In California, nearly one out of five residents is poor. That’s according to the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, which factors in the cost of housing food, utilities and clothing, and which includes noncash government assistance as a form of income.
    .
    Looking to help poor and low-income residents, California lawmakers also recently passed a measure raising the minimum wage from $10 an hour to $15 an hour by 2022. But a higher minimum wage will do nothing for the 60% of Californians who live in poverty and don’t have jobs. And research indicates that it could cause many who do have jobs to lose them.
    .
    As homeless camps explode in L.A. suburbs, residents fear they will become permanent.
    .
    Southern California’s homeless population has exploded in recent years. Orange County alone has seen a huge surge, with an estimated 6,145 people calling the camps home. That is according to the 2017 homeless count. It is a 4% increase from 2016.
    .
    It’s not as though California policymakers have neglected to ‘wage war’ on poverty. Sacramento and local governments have spent massive amounts on the cause.
    .
    But several state and municipal benefit programs overlap with one another. That results in some cases with individuals with incomes 200% above the poverty line receiving benefits. The generous spending has not only failed to decrease poverty; it actually seems to have made it worse.
    .
    Since Gov. Brown was sworn in, 243,099 people have fled California on net for other states.
    .
    They took $7.794 billion with them to states that don’t have such high taxes and onerous regulations that make housing unaffordable for middle class households.
    .
    The personal and corporate income tax hikes championed by Gov. Brown in 2012 have likely helped exacerbate the exodus of Californians. In a move that will further drive up the cost of living in one of the hardest states in which to get by, Gov. Brown approved an extension of the state cap & trade program earlier this year.
    .
    This will hurt low and middle income households the hardest, who will face what is effectively a regressive tax hike in the form of higher gas prices and utility bills.
    .
    Extensive environmental regulations aimed at reducing carbon dioxide emissions make energy more expensive, also hurting the poor. By some estimates, California energy costs are as much as 50% higher than the national average.
    .
    Further contributing to the poverty problem is California’s housing crisis. More than 4 in 10 households spent more than 30% of their income on housing in 2015. A shortage of available units has driven prices ever higher, far above income increases. And that shortage is a direct outgrowth of misguided policies.
    .
    California, in a socialist effort to destroy income inequality, has created the biggest gap between rich and poor ever seen in the state.
    .
    It has become so expensive to live in California that the cost of living actually becomes a disincentive to work. Poor people are better off accepting the generous benefits offered by state and local governments rather than going to work.
    .
    In effect, the reason California is the poverty capital of America is that the state subsidizes poverty. When you subsidize something, you get more of it.
    .
    This simple formula eludes the dolts who run the state. They believe they can continue to tax and tax, and spend and spend, with no consequences to the economy or citizens of the state.
    .
    Lawmakers in Sacramento should take a close look at Illinois. This is their future – a nearly failed state, deeply in debt, with taxes so high that tens of thousands of residents are leaving the state every year.
    .
    Read More: https://joeforamerica.com/2018/03/de...al-of-america/
    .
    My Thoughts:
    .
    If California doesn’t get a Republican in the Governor’s seat, then the massive exodus of people and businesses will continue to happen and sooner or later the citizens there will understand that they are at fault for what they voted into power there.
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  10. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by XD40scinNC View Post
    It's really sad how much effort Ops putting into his anger about things he is totally powerless to change, or even affect even in the slightest. Obviously there is nothing in his life that gives him more satisfaction than screaming at democrats from his bunker, a sad and lonely existence driven by fake news sites and a buffoon of a president.
    It's not anger, it's being pissed at what your Democrats have done to this state. It's sad that you don't feel that way.
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  11. #20
    As homeless camps explode in L.A. suburbs, residents fear they will become permanent
    .
    Raul Rodriguez lives at a homeless camp along West 117th and South Figueroa streets in Los Angeles. Health officials have been directed to install public toilets and hand washing stations in four homeless encampments throughout L.A. County to combat the hepatitis A outbreak. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)
    .
    In the shadow of the roaring 110 Freeway in West Carson, Jennifer Morris stepped out of the portable restroom and washed her hands in a nearby sink.
    .
    Morris' pajama bottoms and shirt were covered in dirt, but she said she hadn't felt this clean in months.
    .
    Morris, 41, lost her job at a pet rescue organization about a year ago. Ever since, she's lived with her boyfriend in a sprawling homeless encampment in the unincorporated community, the thick brush hiding rows of tents where she slept, cooked meals and went to the bathroom.
    .
    As Southern California's homeless population has exploded in recent years, the South Bay and Harbor areas have seen their own surge, with an estimated 6,145 people calling the camps home, according to the 2017 homeless count — a 4% increase from 2016.
    .
    Read More: As homeless camps explode in L.A. suburbs, residents fear they will become permanent
    .
    My Thoughts:
    .
    We lived in San Diego CA for 11 years during the 70’s when I was in the Navy and it wasn’t this bad, it’s really gone downhill since then.
    .
    If you want to know how to ruin a state, look no further than California.-147f.jpg
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

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