If you want to know how to ruin a state, look no further than California.
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Thread: If you want to know how to ruin a state, look no further than California.

  1. #1

    If you want to know how to ruin a state, look no further than California.

    If you want to know how to ruin a state, look no further than California.
    .
    . Highest Debt
    . Highest Unemployment
    . Highest income Tax
    . Highest corporate Tax
    . Most regulations
    . Most Welfare recipients
    . Highest homeless population
    . Highest number of illegal aliens
    . Highest number of unauthorized tent camps
    . Thousands are leaving the state
    .
    And who controls this bucket of worms?
    .
    Moonbeam and the Democrats
    .
    That's what you get when you have Democrats in charge for the last 30 years.
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  2.   
  3. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by opsspec1991 View Post
    If you want to know how to ruin a state, look no further than California.
    .
    . Highest Debt
    . Highest Unemployment
    . Highest income Tax
    . Highest corporate Tax
    . Most regulations
    . Most Welfare recipients
    . Highest homeless population
    . Highest number of illegal aliens
    . Highest number of unauthorized tent camps
    .
    And who controls this bucket of worms?
    .
    Moonbeam and the Democrats
    .
    That's what you get when you have Democrats in charge for the last 30 years.
    Actually Gov. Brown came in AFTER republicans ran the state under the Terminator and took the state from having a $25 billion budget deficit and and is leaving it with a $6 Billion budgetary surplus. Sort of like Obama came in and cleaned up Bush's mess and got the country where it needed to be...and he did it IN SPITE of republicans. There's a pattern there.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using USA Carry mobile app
    Evangelical Christians have traded in their morality for a lust for power. Never let them pretend they have the moral high ground!

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by S&W29 View Post
    Actually Gov. Brown came in AFTER republicans ran the state under the Terminator and took the state from having a $25 billion budget deficit and and is leaving it with a $6 Billion budgetary surplus. Sort of like Obama came in and cleaned up Bush's mess and got the country where it needed to be...and he did it IN SPITE of republicans. There's a pattern there.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using USA Carry mobile app
    Yea S&W29, California under moonbeam is doing a bang up job.
    .
    Economic chill? California growth slips from 4th to 35th, by one government yardstick
    .
    More evidence of a cooling California economy: The state has slipped down the rankings of overall business growth.
    .
    The latest federal government report on state-by-state gross domestic product — the broadest measure of business output — shows California’s economy growing at a 2.1 percent annual pace in the second quarter. Yes, that’s still growth. Plus, it’s up from a very slow 0.6 percent in the previous quarter. But don’t forget that it’s also down from 3.7 percent a year ago.
    .
    Here are seven trends to ponder about the state’s economic chill:
    .
    1. Not average results: The springtime improvement was not enough to get California back above the national growth rate. U.S. GDP grew at a 2.8 percent annual rate in the second quarter, by this measurement, as California’s growth ranked 35th among the 50 states.
    .
    2. Not 2016: Last year, California’s economy grew at a 3.3 annual pace. That was fourth-best among the states and more than double the nation’s 1.5 percent growth. Talk about a letdown!
    .
    3. Not a surprise: This California GDP slowdown is in line with other economic metrics. Job creation, for example, is running at a 1.6 percent pace statewide this year — slowest in five years. And total wages paid in California increased at a 3.5 percent annual pace in the second quarter, second slowest since 2013.
    .
    4. Not a great outlook: California had the 10th worst economic prospects among the states in August and 13th worst in September — the state’s lowest rankings since 2010. That’s according to a monthly, forward-looking index from the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia that tracks six-month outlooks for each state’s growth.
    .
    5. Not just our problem: California’s sluggishness should also be a national worry. Its GDP totaled $2.7 trillion in the second quarter or roughly one-seventh of the entire nation’s business output. Since the recession, the state has been an economic leader: From 2010 through 2016, California averaged 3.1 percent-a-year GDP growth.
    .
    6. Not an energy issue: Fast-growth states in the second quarter are rebounding with a recovery in oil prices. Tops was North Dakota with an economy expanding at an 8.3 percent annual rate in the second quarter vs. a 5 percent declining rate a year earlier. Next was Wyoming, growing at 7.6 percent pace vs. contracting 1.8 percent a year earlier. Third was Texas, up 6.2 percent vs. down 0.3 percent in 2016’s second quarter.
    .
    7. Not very pretty: The poorest performer in the second quarter was Iowa. Its GDP contracted at a 0.7 percent annual rate vs. expansion of 1.6 percent a year earlier.
    .
    Read More: https://www.ocregister.com/2017/11/2...ent-yardstick/
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  5. #4
    Tell me which state is doing better, California or Kansas? California or Oklahoma? California or Alabama? California or Mississippi?

    Sent from my LG-H910 using USA Carry mobile app
    Evangelical Christians have traded in their morality for a lust for power. Never let them pretend they have the moral high ground!

  6. #5
    S&W29, what were you saying about California’s debt?
    .
    California’s $400 billion debt worries analysts
    .
    SACRAMENTO — California has come a long way to dig itself out of budget deficits, but the state remains on shaky ground due to nearly $400 billion in unfunded liabilities and debt from public pensions, retiree health care and bonds, financial analysts say.
    .
    “Yes, the state’s budget is balanced if you are looking at what they are required to spend cash on this year, but not when you look at their expenses,” said Gabe Petek, a credit analyst with Standard & Poor’s.
    .
    More by Melody Gutierrez
    .
    Prospect of taxes sours budget support, poll finds
    .
    Lawmakers stand and greet Gov. Jerry Brown as he walks across the floor of the State Assembly to deliver the annual State of the State address at the State Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016.
    .
    Jerry Brown says state must pay debt, new taxes on horizon
    .
    Gov. Brown’s State of the State may have familiar tone
    .
    The high debt and unfunded liabilities have resulted in the state’s rating lagging behind other states, Petek says. California saw its bond rating rise last year from A+ to AA-, the highest level the state has had in 14 years. Good bond ratings are a sign of a strong budget and financial management and allow states to pay lower interest rates when selling bonds.
    .
    “Compared to other states, though, California has one of the lower ratings,” Petek said.
    .
    And the reason is clear, he said. It’s California’s debt and liabilities that are concerning financial analysts, particularly the state’s rapidly growing unfunded retiree health care costs, which grew more than 80 percent over the past decade. California has promised $74 billion more in health and dental benefits to current and retired state workers than the state has put aside.
    .
    Major liabilities
    .
    Without changes, the state estimates that unfunded liability would grow to $300 billion by 2047.
    .
    “These liabilities are so massive that it is tempting to ignore them,” Gov. Jerry Brown said last month in his State of the State speech. “We can’t possibly pay them off in a year or two or even 10. And there is little satisfaction in the notion of chipping away at an obligation for three decades to pay for something that has already been promised. Yet, it is our moral obligation to do so — particularly before we make new commitments.”
    .
    H.D. Palmer, spokesman for the Department of Finance, said the governor is focused this year on reining in retiree health care costs. The retirement plan is one of the most generous in the nation, covering 100 percent of retirees’ medical costs if they worked for the state for 20 years. Currently, the state pays only for the cost of providing care to retired workers, and does not put money aside for those who will retire in the future.
    .
    “The pay-as-you-go model is clearly not going to be sustainable over the long haul, particularly with a workforce that is aging,” Palmer said. “Roughly 1,000 people turn 65 in California each day, a number of those are state workers. What does that mean for the state in terms of long-term fiscal planning?”
    .
    Last year, the state successfully negotiated with the professional engineers union to have those workers contribute half of 1 percent to their retiree health benefits in 2017 and 2018 and 1 percent of their salary in 2019. The state will match those contributions.
    .
    Pension debt
    .
    Engineers, however, will see their contributions offset by a 5 percent raise this summer and a 2 percent raise in 2017.
    .
    The engineers union also agreed to increase the amount of time it takes to earn full retiree health benefits from 20 years to 25 years and decrease the coverage the state pays for from 100 percent of premiums to 80 percent. Those changes affect only new employees.
    .
    Palmer said the changes along with the prefunding of retiree health will be a model as the state begins negotiations with other unions this spring.
    .
    State Sen. John Moorlach, R-Costa Mesa (Orange County) said he’s skeptical that the state’s model for funding retiree health benefits is the right move. Moorlach said offering raises to employees to offset their contribution to their retiree health benefits puts more pressure on the pension system, which pays retirees based on their salaries.
    .
    “As we say in accounting, it’s missing the sizzle of the deal,” said Moorlach, a certified public accountant and financial planner.
    .
    Moorlach said he’s concerned with the state’s pension debt — the teachers retirement system alone faces a $72.7 billion unfunded liability. The most recent estimate in 2014 for the California Public Employees’ Retirement System shows a $43.2 billion unfunded liability.
    .
    Bond debt
    .
    Bond debt also has risen substantially in California, with the state’s reliance on borrowing for infrastructure resulting in 1 of every 2 dollars spent on those projects going to pay interest, according to the Department of Finance.

    Bonds are approved by voters and generally used to pay for infrastructure, such as building schools and roads.
    .
    From 1974 to 1999, California voters approved $38.4 billion of general obligation bonds. Since 2000, voters approved more than $103.2 billion. The state is paying on $86.8 billion in bond debt with another $32.3 billion expected to be issued in the coming years.
    .
    In November, voters will be asked to approve a $9 billion school construction bond.
    .
    The state has $77 billion in deferred maintenance needed to fix roads, highways and bridges, which Brown said is likely to require a new tax or fee.
    .
    All these debts and liabilities should concern taxpayers, said Autumn Carter, executive director of California Common Sense, a Mountain View nonpartisan policy group that does fiscal and budget analysis. When the next recession hits, Carter said, the state’s payments on pensions, retiree health and bond debt will put pressure on social services and other programs.
    .
    “There is nothing that says we have to fall into financial ruin,” Carter said. “There is still time to turn it around. We can still attack debt and tackle the cost growth associated with pensions and retiree health care, but we have to be willing to do it.”
    .
    Read More: https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics...ts-6812264.php
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by opsspec1991 View Post
    S&W29, what were you saying about California’s debt?
    .
    California’s $400 billion debt worries analysts
    .
    SACRAMENTO — California has come a long way to dig itself out of budget deficits, but the state remains on shaky ground due to nearly $400 billion in unfunded liabilities and debt from public pensions, retiree health care and bonds, financial analysts say.
    .
    “Yes, the state’s budget is balanced if you are looking at what they are required to spend cash on this year, but not when you look at their expenses,” said Gabe Petek, a credit analyst with Standard & Poor’s.
    .
    More by Melody Gutierrez
    .
    Prospect of taxes sours budget support, poll finds
    .
    Lawmakers stand and greet Gov. Jerry Brown as he walks across the floor of the State Assembly to deliver the annual State of the State address at the State Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016.
    .
    Jerry Brown says state must pay debt, new taxes on horizon
    .
    Gov. Brown’s State of the State may have familiar tone
    .
    The high debt and unfunded liabilities have resulted in the state’s rating lagging behind other states, Petek says. California saw its bond rating rise last year from A+ to AA-, the highest level the state has had in 14 years. Good bond ratings are a sign of a strong budget and financial management and allow states to pay lower interest rates when selling bonds.
    .
    “Compared to other states, though, California has one of the lower ratings,” Petek said.
    .
    And the reason is clear, he said. It’s California’s debt and liabilities that are concerning financial analysts, particularly the state’s rapidly growing unfunded retiree health care costs, which grew more than 80 percent over the past decade. California has promised $74 billion more in health and dental benefits to current and retired state workers than the state has put aside.
    .
    Major liabilities
    .
    Without changes, the state estimates that unfunded liability would grow to $300 billion by 2047.
    .
    “These liabilities are so massive that it is tempting to ignore them,” Gov. Jerry Brown said last month in his State of the State speech. “We can’t possibly pay them off in a year or two or even 10. And there is little satisfaction in the notion of chipping away at an obligation for three decades to pay for something that has already been promised. Yet, it is our moral obligation to do so — particularly before we make new commitments.”
    .
    H.D. Palmer, spokesman for the Department of Finance, said the governor is focused this year on reining in retiree health care costs. The retirement plan is one of the most generous in the nation, covering 100 percent of retirees’ medical costs if they worked for the state for 20 years. Currently, the state pays only for the cost of providing care to retired workers, and does not put money aside for those who will retire in the future.
    .
    “The pay-as-you-go model is clearly not going to be sustainable over the long haul, particularly with a workforce that is aging,” Palmer said. “Roughly 1,000 people turn 65 in California each day, a number of those are state workers. What does that mean for the state in terms of long-term fiscal planning?”
    .
    Last year, the state successfully negotiated with the professional engineers union to have those workers contribute half of 1 percent to their retiree health benefits in 2017 and 2018 and 1 percent of their salary in 2019. The state will match those contributions.
    .
    Pension debt
    .
    Engineers, however, will see their contributions offset by a 5 percent raise this summer and a 2 percent raise in 2017.
    .
    The engineers union also agreed to increase the amount of time it takes to earn full retiree health benefits from 20 years to 25 years and decrease the coverage the state pays for from 100 percent of premiums to 80 percent. Those changes affect only new employees.
    .
    Palmer said the changes along with the prefunding of retiree health will be a model as the state begins negotiations with other unions this spring.
    .
    State Sen. John Moorlach, R-Costa Mesa (Orange County) said he’s skeptical that the state’s model for funding retiree health benefits is the right move. Moorlach said offering raises to employees to offset their contribution to their retiree health benefits puts more pressure on the pension system, which pays retirees based on their salaries.
    .
    “As we say in accounting, it’s missing the sizzle of the deal,” said Moorlach, a certified public accountant and financial planner.
    .
    Moorlach said he’s concerned with the state’s pension debt — the teachers retirement system alone faces a $72.7 billion unfunded liability. The most recent estimate in 2014 for the California Public Employees’ Retirement System shows a $43.2 billion unfunded liability.
    .
    Bond debt
    .
    Bond debt also has risen substantially in California, with the state’s reliance on borrowing for infrastructure resulting in 1 of every 2 dollars spent on those projects going to pay interest, according to the Department of Finance.

    Bonds are approved by voters and generally used to pay for infrastructure, such as building schools and roads.
    .
    From 1974 to 1999, California voters approved $38.4 billion of general obligation bonds. Since 2000, voters approved more than $103.2 billion. The state is paying on $86.8 billion in bond debt with another $32.3 billion expected to be issued in the coming years.
    .
    In November, voters will be asked to approve a $9 billion school construction bond.
    .
    The state has $77 billion in deferred maintenance needed to fix roads, highways and bridges, which Brown said is likely to require a new tax or fee.
    .
    All these debts and liabilities should concern taxpayers, said Autumn Carter, executive director of California Common Sense, a Mountain View nonpartisan policy group that does fiscal and budget analysis. When the next recession hits, Carter said, the state’s payments on pensions, retiree health and bond debt will put pressure on social services and other programs.
    .
    “There is nothing that says we have to fall into financial ruin,” Carter said. “There is still time to turn it around. We can still attack debt and tackle the cost growth associated with pensions and retiree health care, but we have to be willing to do it.”
    .
    Read More: https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics...ts-6812264.php
    Given that you're a Trump fanboy and republicans don't care about debt or deficits anymore....I won't rely on your opinion in regards to the debt or economic prospects of any state.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using USA Carry mobile app
    Evangelical Christians have traded in their morality for a lust for power. Never let them pretend they have the moral high ground!

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by S&W29 View Post
    Given that you're a Trump fanboy and republicans don't care about debt or deficits anymore....I won't rely on your opinion in regards to the debt or economic prospects of any state.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using USA Carry mobile app
    Can't you even read, it was the San Fran Chronicle's opinion, I was just the messenger to show that your opinions that aren't backed up one bit, are full of it.
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  9. Quote Originally Posted by S&W29 View Post
    Given that you're a Trump fanboy and republicans don't care about debt or deficits anymore....I won't rely on your opinion in regards to the debt or economic prospects of any state.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using USA Carry mobile app
    San Jose Mercury News. Same survey is also in USA Today, Business Insider etc...
    CA is 50th in Quality of Life as of this 1 March 2018 publication date.

    I was thinking it was anecdotal on my part because I bailed and all my friends and relatives there are clawing to get out. Its not, it's getting worse everyday, and unless you're in SF tech, it's not good for the majority of folks. I do know they are in top 3 states for population exodus also with Illinois being number one.

    https://www.mercurynews.com/2018/02/...fe-study-says/

    Sent from my XT1650 using USA Carry mobile app


  10. Quote Originally Posted by ProudAmericanFirst View Post
    Mark Dice slams stupid people. I haven't watched in a while but used to watch this with my brother in law's for hours.

    Sent from my XT1650 using USA Carry mobile app

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