3rd State Declares Sovereignty From BATFE - Page 4
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Thread: 3rd State Declares Sovereignty From BATFE

  1. #31
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by melloyello View Post
    I read somewhere that it is not illegal to manufacture a firearm in SC under two conditions: it is not made for resale (personal use only) and you are permitted to own a firearm.
    Well, I wasn't really considering private use firearms manufacturing. I was considering at least boutique manufacturing, or even small-scale industrial manufacturing, explicitly for sale to the public. Of course, ... now I am.

    That BATFE document is geared toward the pitfalls of assembling a firearm from pre-made parts, especially imported parts. What are the pitfalls of assembling a firearm from billet and plate stock that you cut, mill, and lathe yourself? A truly hand-made firearm? What are the BATFE restrictions on that?

    I've tried to find info on private gun making in Indiana and failed. Would I be kosher in milling all the parts, assembling, and firing something like a rotary barrelled 5.56 mm? A sort of mini-mini-gun? As long as I didn't have the intent in my heart at the time of manufacture to sell it or distribute it? Could a non-FFL holder do that?

    I found this year old thread over at a forum called The High Road.org:

    Can I manufacture my own GUN ??? - THR
    When they "Nudge. Shove. Shoot.",
    Don't retreat. Just reload.

  2.   
  3. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by CathyInBlue View Post
    Well, I wasn't really considering private use firearms manufacturing. I was considering at least boutique manufacturing, or even small-scale industrial manufacturing, explicitly for sale to the public. Of course, ... now I am.

    That BATFE document is geared toward the pitfalls of assembling a firearm from pre-made parts, especially imported parts. What are the pitfalls of assembling a firearm from billet and plate stock that you cut, mill, and lathe yourself? A truly hand-made firearm? What are the BATFE restrictions on that?

    I've tried to find info on private gun making in Indiana and failed. Would I be kosher in milling all the parts, assembling, and firing something like a rotary barreled 5.56 mm? A sort of mini-mini-gun? As long as I didn't have the intent in my heart at the time of manufacture to sell it or distribute it? Could a non-FFL holder do that?

    I found this year old thread over at a forum called The High Road.org:

    Can I manufacture my own GUN ??? - THR
    there is some misinformation on the THR link...

    basically, under current federal/batfe infringements of the second amendment...

    you can assemble rifles, handguns and the like and transfer them if the base frame/receiver has the BATFE Licensed U.S. Manufacturer's unique serial number on it...
    And you are as currently defined, under current federal and state, county, city and other municipality where you reside legally able to possess said firearm...

    IF you manufacturer it in its entirety, it must be uniquely engraved with your name and some unique serial number identifier; and you can NEVER, transfer it to ANYBODY, not even your own family...

    And you can only manufacturer rifles, muzzle loaders and pistols only, no fully automatic's period, without a special, very expensive license, that only allows you to retain said firearm as long as your license is current...
    These licenses are more then most people pay in property taxes on 1/2 million dollar houses...

    To manufacture firearms from scratch for resale you must have a Federal Firearms Manufacturer's License, combined with a FFL that will allow you to sell, transfer, etc...
    These licenses give the BATFE carte blanche to randomly inspect your manufacturing facility for violations that they deem appropriate at the time, regardless of whether it is currently documented...
    They further can and will impose draconian fines for paper work errors such as typo's, misspellings, etc...
    Further, these licenses are typically, annually renewable, and you need different ones and or combination's of licenses to manufacturer pistols, rifles, muzzle loaders, etc...
    There is no one fits all, in addition, unless you anticipate being able to sell thousands plus every year, the licenses will be cost prohibitive...

  4. #33
    GOVERNOR SARAH PALIN ROCKS!


    Palin Signs Alaska Sovereignty Resolution


    Monday 13 July 2009


    By Michael Boldin

    On Friday, July 10th, Alaska Governor Sarah Palin signed House Joint Resolution 27 (HJR27), sponsored by State Rep. Mike Kelly. The resolution “claims sovereignty for the state under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over all powers not otherwise enumerated and granted to the federal government by the Constitution of the United States.”
    The House passed the resolution by a vote of 37-0 (3 not voting) and the Senate passed it by a vote of 40-0.
    Six other states have had both houses of their legislature pass similar resolutions - Tennessee, Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, Oklahoma and Louisiana - Alaska joins Tennessee as the second to have such a resolution signed by the Governor...

    Continued...

    Palin Signs Alaska Sovereignty Resolution|Tenth Amendment Center

    Work on your states 10th amendment initiative...

    http://www.tenthamendmentcenter.com/

  5. #34
    Thanks all for the information... I know I'm coming late to the party by a few months... but, I have emailed my Texas and Florida State reps (Florida is presently considering legislation regarding the tenth amendment). Texas email attached below... the Florida email can be found here.


    It has recently come to my attention that Texas was considering legislation that was based on the Montana Firearms Freedom Act. I wanted to write and share my concerns with using this particular piece of legislation.

    The Montana attempt to lay claim to State sovereignty under the tenth amendment via the Montana Firearms Freedom Act, is at the same time infringing on the inalienable rights of all Americans granted under the second amendment.

    The problem with the Montana bill has to do with the following flawed verbiage limiting the class of firearm a citizen can own. That verbiage is as follows:

    Section 5. Exceptions. [Section 4] does not apply to:
    ...
    (4) a firearm that discharges two or more projectiles with one activation of the trigger or other firing device
    ...

    I am all for the State of Texas (and every State in the Union) exercising their individual State sovereignty granted under the tenth amendment. Just not at the expense of the second amendment! The second amendment does not say "SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED" except if your zip code is x, your standing at y or the type/class of firearm you have or desire to have is z.

    The Montana Firearms Act would set a dangerous precedence suggesting the State has the right to infringe upon second amendment rights of an individual of that State by defining which class of arms one can bear. If the State can prohibit class 3 arms, what would stop an attempt by the State to prohibit ALL class weapons?

    The second amendment gives all Americans the right to bear arms and neither the Federal nor a State government has the authority to infringe upon those rights. Americans second amendment rights to bear arms SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED!

    If the Montana Bill is passed and later upheld by the Supreme Court, it would basically give the State the right to regulate firearms in any way it sees fit.

    I strongly urge you to reject the use of the Montana Firearms Freedom Act. Further, I would encourage the Texas legislature to consider using instead the verbiage detailed in the Alaska Sovereignty Resolution.

    On Friday, July 10th, Alaska Governor Sarah Palin signed House Joint Resolution 27 (HJR27), sponsored by State Rep. Mike Kelly. The resolution “claims sovereignty for the state under the Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States over all powers not otherwise enumerated and granted to the federal government by the Constitution of the United States.”

    This bill was unanimously passed by the Alaskan House and Senate. Six other states have had both houses of their legislature pass similar resolutions—Tennessee, Idaho, North Dakota, South Dakota, Oklahoma and Louisiana—Alaska joins Tennessee as the second to have such a resolution signed by the Governor.

    It is my hope that Texas will follow suit and exert her tenth amendment powers of state sovereignty. BUT, it is also my hope that Texas will steer clear of any sort of legislative verbiage that would prohibit and infringe upon the second amendment rights granted to all Americans.
    Credit to Bo and Utim for some of the content I used in my email. Thanks! :)
    Blessed be my God, my mountain, who trains me to fight fair and well! Psalm 144 (msg)
    ...follow me at twitter.com/matthewaynelson

  6. #35
    It certainly clearly articulates the point you are trying to make. Well done.
    The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution so the second will not become the legalized version of the first. - Thomas Jefferson

  7. #36
    "Congress has no power to disarm the militia. Their swords, and every other terrible implement of the soldier, are the birth-right of an American ... the unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." - Tench Coxe 1789

    What was the straw that broke the Colonists backs?

    When the British tried to take their cannons away, under the guise of farmers have no need for a cannon or large quantities of firearms and powder and balls...

    Marked the beginning of the Revolutionary War at Lexington...
    What a travesty, that the State that started it all, now has Second Amendments, second only to the Republic of Kalifornia...

    Why is the Cannon on the Texas "Come And Take It" Flag" ?

    The answer to both is the same... the unalienable right to defend oneself from a Tyrannical government, or any threat foreign or domestic by any means necessary, any place, any time...

    Battles of Lexington and Concord - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The founding fathers were very, clear, concise in the first 12 Amendments... something that can not be said for the reconstruction and forward amendments... 13th forward...

  8. #37

    WTFU Sheeple Virginia is blowing it on the Firearms Freedom Act Too!

    How fricking dense are these people?

    Why do they continue to copy the fundamentally flawed Montana & Tennessee Firearm Freedom Acts?

    HOUSE BILL NO. 69 Offered January 13, 2010 Prefiled December 29, 2009 A BILL to amend the Code of Virginia by adding a section numbered 18.2-308.2:4, relating to firearms, firearms accessories, and ammunition manufactured and retained in Virginia. ----------
    Patrons-- Carrico, Anderson, Athey, Bell, Richard P., Cleaveland, Cole, Cox, J.A., Crockett-Stark, Edmunds, Gear, Gilbert, Howell, W.J., Johnson, Kilgore, Landes, Lingamfelter, Marshall, R.G., Merricks, Miller, J.H., Pogge, Ware, R.L. and Wright; Senators: Hurt, Puckett, Ruff and Stuart
    ---------- Referred to Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety ---------- Whereas, the 10th Amendment of the United States Constitution guarantees to the states and their people all powers not granted to the federal government elsewhere in the Constitution; and
    Whereas, the 9th Amendment to the United States Constitution guarantees to the people rights not enumerated in the Constitution; and
    Whereas, the regulation of intrastate commerce is vested in the states under the 9th and 10th Amendments to the United States Constitution, particularly if not expressly preempted by federal law. Congress has not expressly preempted state regulation of commerce pertaining to the intrastate manufacture of firearms, firearms accessories, and ammunition; and
    Whereas, the 2nd Amendment to the United States Constitution reserves to the people the right to keep and bear arms; and
    Whereas, Article 1, Section 13 of the Constitution of Virginia clearly secures the right of Virginia citizens to keep and bear arms; now, therefore
    Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Virginia:
    1. That the Code of Virginia is amended by adding a section numbered 18.2-308.2:4 as follows:
    18.2-308.2:4. Exemption of firearms, firearm accessories, and ammunition manufactured in Virginia from federal regulation.
    A. As used in this section:
    "Ammunition" means the combination of a cartridge, projectile, primer, or propellant designed for use in a firearm other than an antique firearm as defined in 18.2-308.2:2.
    "Basic materials" include but are not limited to unmachined steel and unshaped wood.
    "Firearm" means any handgun, shotgun, or rifle that will or is designed to expel single or multiple projectiles by action of an explosion of combustible material.
    "Firearm accessory" means an item used in conjunction with or mounted upon a firearm, but which is not essential to the basic function of the firearm, including but not limited to telescopic or laser sights, magazines, flash or sound suppressors, folding or aftermarket stocks and grips, speedloaders, ammunition carriers, and lights for target illumination.
    "Generic and insignificant parts" include but are not limited to springs, screws, nuts, and pins.
    "Manufactured" means that a firearm, firearm accessory, or ammunition has been created from basic materials for functional usefulness, including but not limited to forging, casting, machining, or other processes for working materials.
    B. Firearms, firearm accessories, and ammunition that are manufactured commercially or privately in Virginia, and that remain within the borders of Virginia, shall not be subject to federal law or federal regulation, including registration, under the authority of the United States Congress to regulate interstate commerce. Such firearms, firearm accessories, and ammunition are deemed to have not traveled in interstate commerce. This section shall be applicable to firearms, firearm accessories, and ammunition that are manufactured in Virginia from basic materials and that can be manufactured without the inclusion of any significant parts imported from another state. The importation into Virginia of generic or insignificant parts that have other manufacturing or consumer product applications other than firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition and that are incorporated into firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition manufactured in Virginia shall not subject the firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition to federal regulation. Basic materials used for manufacturing shall not be considered firearms, firearms accessories, or ammunition for purposes of this section, and shall not be subject to the authority of the United States Congress to regulate the interstate commerce of firearms, firearms accessories, or ammunition as if they actually were firearms, firearms accessories, or ammunition simply because the basic materials are used in the manufacture of firearms, firearms accessories, or ammunition in Virginia. Firearms accessories that are imported into Virginia from another state and that are subject to federal regulation as being in interstate commerce shall not subject a firearm manufactured in Virginia to federal regulation under interstate commerce because they are attached to or used in conjunction with a firearm manufactured in Virginia.
    C. This section shall not apply to:
    1. A firearm that cannot be carried and used by one person;
    2. A firearm that has a bore diameter greater than one and one-half inches and that used smokeless powder, and not black powder, as a propellant;
    3. Ammunition with a projectile that explodes using an explosion of chemical energy after the projectile leaves the firearm; or
    4. A firearm that discharges two or more projectiles with open activation of the trigger or other firing device.
    D. In order to fall under the purview of this section, any firearm manufactured and sold in Virginia shall have the words "Made in Virginia" clearly stamped on a central metallic part, such as on the receiver or the frame.
    E. This section shall apply to firearms, firearms accessories, and ammunition that are manufactured and retained in Virginia on or after July 1, 2010.


    Bill Tracking - 2010 session > Legislation

    "The people never give up their liberties, but under some delusion." - Edmund Burke

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