Religion and Self-Defense - Page 6
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Thread: Religion and Self-Defense

  1. #51

    Cool Huh?

    Quote Originally Posted by brolin1911a1 View Post
    I think if you research them far enough you'll find that most of those laws prohibiting guns in churches stem from the era following the War Between the States. Blacks taking their guns to church with them made it inconvenient for Klansmen and other unreconstructed die-hards to raid, rape, and pillage such gatherings. As with many of the firearms laws taken for granted today, this prohibition was more about protecting a privileged class of criminal than preventing crime.
    I just finished reading this entire thread and must say that this is the most off-the-wall comment I have read thus far. I am Southern, born and bred, and haven't ever heard anything so far fetched. Most of the activities of the Klan I ever heard of were conducted at night and not in black churches. If it were only blacks who were restricted from taking guns to church, then why did the restriction apply to white churches also? Dude, I don't mean to flame you but this is way out in left field! Any way, you have a good day now, ya' heah?

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  3. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Idaho
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    Jesus did not care much for religion either. Read his word and decide for yourself. Don't take the word of man to much to heart for it will let you down everytime.

  4. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by Oldgrunt View Post
    I just finished reading this entire thread and must say that this is the most off-the-wall comment I have read thus far. I am Southern, born and bred, and haven't ever heard anything so far fetched. Most of the activities of the Klan I ever heard of were conducted at night and not in black churches. If it were only blacks who were restricted from taking guns to church, then why did the restriction apply to white churches also? Dude, I don't mean to flame you but this is way out in left field! Any way, you have a good day now, ya' heah?
    You didn't flame me. Your response was reasonable, valid, and IMHO quite understandable. I made a statement without citation and, unfortunately, at this moment any references I could come up with are loaned out and unavailable until at least after the holidays. So I cannot in the least resent your response to my weak claim.

    I do ask, however, that you look at the time period during which these laws were passed. And look at the regions where the first of these laws were passed. Contrary to popular revisionism, the north during and after Reconstruction was (and remains in far too many cases) quite racist, just not as overt. Instead of passing laws, for instance, against Negroes (the term at the time) owning guns, laws were passed requiring a permit from the local sheriff. Usually language was included requiring one to be of good moral character and able to provide references from members of the community of good repute. During testimony in 2007 to repeal Missouri's permit to acquire a concealable weapon, citizens told how that law was used to effectively prevent any blacks from legally purchasing handguns in St. Louis as recently as the nineteen-seventies. At the time of passage the legislatures and the citizens understood that the laws would be selectively applied and enforced.

    The South may have had overt segregation laws. But much of the North resented the influx of freed slaves and could be much more violent on a local level to freedmen trying to settle there.

    I concede that does not directly address the question of bans on guns in churches. But, again, I refer you to the times when most such laws were passed, the Reconstruction era. What other motive or behavior existed at that time that would have caused so many state and local governments to pass such laws, to reverse a practice that in colonial times sometimes required by law that those attending church be armed?

    I may be wrong. It certainly won't be the first time. I take no offense at being corrected. I'm just throwing this out for consideration.

  5. #54

    Cool

    Brolin1911A1: Glad you didn't take offense at my comment. I realize that the South(erners) get blamed a lot for things that happened years ago but, surprisingly, you would be pleasantly surprised at the humanity shown towards blacks in the rural areas and how they were helped by the white citizenry as well as also helping. There were (and still are) some that still have that mind set of the antebellum south and segregation but that is a subject for another arena. Back to the subject of guns in church, I have been taught since childhood (a looooong time ago) that guns were taboo in church and were a sign of disrespect to the Lord. In recent years that thought has changed and an apparent necessity to be armed while in church has arisen. My pastor would probably die of shock if he saw a weapon in church. He just doesn't know that they are there , however, I don't think he would mind seeing one if some BG started acting out. I, personally, feel that "one's gotta do what one's gotta do." Y'all have a Merry Christmas.

  6. #55
    Old Grunt, I happened to post some links in another thread on this website... http://www.usacarry.com/forums/gener...control-2.html and thought you might find some of the links I posted there of interest, especially Clayton Cramer's 1993 article on the racist roots of gun control. The Racist Roots of Gun Control The Racist Roots of Gun Control (1995)

    The Racist Roots of Gun Control The Racist Roots of Gun Control is the same article with an interesting foreword by a black man pointing out why groups like the NAACP (in 2003) don't want to discuss the racist origins of gun control laws.

    Supreme Court affirms racist origins of Gun Control Supreme Court affirms racist origins of Gun Control is an article on how McDonald v DC exposed the racist origins of DC's gun laws.

    http://www.gurapossessky.com/news/pa...alEquality.pdf is a brief from Roy Innis and the Congress of Racial Equality in the DC v Heller case regarding the racist origins of gun laws.

    The Disarming of Black America by Richard Poe is also a good read with modern, current day laws included. The Disarming of Black America by Richard Poe

    Have a Merry Christmas.

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