My Smith & Wesson customer service experience - Page 4
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Thread: My Smith & Wesson customer service experience

  1. I'm currently having a bad experience with SW Service as well. I bought a new MP M2.0 5" 10-14-2017 and have fired about 5K rounds through it, loving the gun. Then the slide lock assemble broke just ahead of the left side thumb tab. I called SW Service 6 times, using both the toll free number and the direct number the phone rang for 10 min each time with no option for voice mail. Finally I got them by going through the receptionist transferring me to service but it still was a long slow process. The fella who answered sounded disturbed that he had to take phone call. I did get the RGA & shipping label and sent the gun back. They received the gun on 5-16-18 and I called to check on it about a week later. I was told it was in the Service Department waiting to be looked at. Then I was told the normal turn around for repairs is 4-6 WEEKS! Either they are severely under staffed or have so many warranty problems they can't keep up!
    I'm very disappointed in what I thought was a good American Made company.

  2.   
  3. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    406
    Classic example of arrogant American manufacturer resting on their laurels instead of continuously improving.

    This is precisely how Honda, Toyota, and Nissan derailed Detroit. American car manufacturers thought they had it made, that no significant percentage of the market would ever buy a car made overseas.

    They were wrong. S&W is wrong, too.

    The Six Sigma approach aims to have just 1 defect out of 1,000,000. To old-school American manufacturers, that can't be done. But to both American and foreign manufacturers who've been achieving that goal for decades, it's simply the way to do things right.

    When I bought my first firearm, I spent a LOT of time looking at pretty much everything on the market, not merely how it felt in my hand, but how it was put together, the company's reputation, examining negative reports -- the whole nine yards.

    I discovered a foreign manufacturer whose firearms had a reputation for handling 100,000 rounds before any component of the firearm failed.

    That, the company's reputation for outstanding customer service, and the way it felt in my hand and it's action is what convinced me I was making a good buy. Turned out to be an outstanding buy. :)
    It is to one's honor to avoid strife, but every fool is quick to quarrel (Pro 20:3) // I came here to build Pro-2A consensus to help our country, not trade insults like a fifth-grader. If you're on ignore, well, now you know why.

  4. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    406

    Hope for American Corporations

    After reading through list thread, it appears as if Smith & Wesson actually wants to go out of business. They sure are trying hard to get there!

    I found an excellent resource for CEOs and other corporate professionals. Most people don't think twice about 5% waste, but if you've a 5% profit margin, trimming just 5% of the waste will DOUBLE your Net Income.

    Here's the quick and dirty list of what's wrong with Corporate America:

    1. Wasting time in meetings. More

    2. Putting work above all else in life. More

    3. Too many long, boring emails. More

    4. CEOs with weak backbones. More

    5. Managers who avoid tough decisions. More

    6. Unclear direction and poor follow-up. More

    7. Too much "collaboration" and not enough action. More

    8. Overly complicated & ornate PowerPoint decks. More

    9. Corporate double standards & sexism. More

    10. Reluctance to promptly address failures and setbacks. More

    11. Rampant politics and infighting. More

    12. Poor calendar management. More

    13. Selfish executives looking out for themselves. More

    14. Poor career management. More

    15. Lack of consistency and focus. More

    16. Failure to take notes and follow-up. More

    17. Protecting poor performers. More

    18. Managers who put friendship over performance. More

    19. Lack of executive integrity. More

    20. Using community events for personal gain. More

    21. Chasing too many strategic objectives. More

    22. Matrixed reporting lines without a single boss. More

    23. Whiners, complainers and pointless debaters. More

    24. Corporate favoritism and bias. More

    25. Passing the buck and blaming "corporate." More

    26. Bullies and jerks. More

    If you'd like to learn how to fix these, check out this gentleman's website.

    ExecuBridge
    It is to one's honor to avoid strife, but every fool is quick to quarrel (Pro 20:3) // I came here to build Pro-2A consensus to help our country, not trade insults like a fifth-grader. If you're on ignore, well, now you know why.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by since9 View Post
    Classic example of arrogant American manufacturer resting on their laurels instead of continuously improving.

    This is precisely how Honda, Toyota, and Nissan derailed Detroit. American car manufacturers thought they had it made, that no significant percentage of the market would ever buy a car made overseas.

    They were wrong. S&W is wrong, too.

    The Six Sigma approach aims to have just 1 defect out of 1,000,000. To old-school American manufacturers, that can't be done. But to both American and foreign manufacturers who've been achieving that goal for decades, it's simply the way to do things right.

    When I bought my first firearm, I spent a LOT of time looking at pretty much everything on the market, not merely how it felt in my hand, but how it was put together, the company's reputation, examining negative reports -- the whole nine yards.

    I discovered a foreign manufacturer whose firearms had a reputation for handling 100,000 rounds before any component of the firearm failed.

    That, the company's reputation for outstanding customer service, and the way it felt in my hand and it's action is what convinced me I was making a good buy. Turned out to be an outstanding buy. :)
    And the foreign manufacturer is...?

  6. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    North Western Oregon
    Posts
    175
    I have only one S&W Pistol, a Sigma 380. After all these years of being discontinued (bought New in '87), they still had a new magazine for it and when I finally learned to take it down and clean and lube the thing it seems okay. I had a issue with PARA Ordinance (they were in the process of being sold and moved) and it eventually got resolved by Remington. So while Para failed, their new owner (Remington) made it right. My Glock experience was expensive as I was a few months beyond the one year warranty, but service was good other than cost. Ruger was quick to fix, easy peasey. FMK had my back, at my request just sent me a new RSA which did the trick.
    I have never had a revolver problem, old or new.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by Pandaz3 View Post
    I have only one S&W Pistol, a Sigma 380. After all these years of being discontinued (bought New in '87), they still had a new magazine for it and when I finally learned to take it down and clean and lube the thing it seems okay. I had a issue with PARA Ordinance (they were in the process of being sold and moved) and it eventually got resolved by Remington. So while Para failed, their new owner (Remington) made it right. My Glock experience was expensive as I was a few months beyond the one year warranty, but service was good other than cost. Ruger was quick to fix, easy peasey. FMK had my back, at my request just sent me a new RSA which did the trick.
    I have never had a revolver problem, old or new.
    Wow, so you have to pay for repairs with Glock if it’s after a year?

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    North Western Oregon
    Posts
    175
    Quote Originally Posted by spirit4earth View Post
    Wow, so you have to pay for repairs with Glock if itís after a year?
    Yes and no, Glock just won't accept it unless it comes FEDEX Air which is $80. The fixing is free,but the shipping isn't.

  9. I’ll find out tomorrow whether S&W fixed my 2.0. It comes back to me after just 2 1/2 weeks.

  10. I know someone who had one 20 years old fixed . It cost right around $11 back in 2013-14. It wasnít necessary then to air freight it , just ground.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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