S.308 (restaurant carry) debate from 4/17/13 - Page 40
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Thread: S.308 (restaurant carry) debate from 4/17/13

  1. #391
    It will become law as soon as it's re-written as an act, signed by the Senate and the House, and walked over to the Governor's office and signed by her.

    I think she has five days to sign or veto an Act, or it becomes law anyway.

  2.   
  3. Quote Originally Posted by DLB1964 View Post
    NC carry bill passed in May or June 2013 and became law in Oct of 2013.

    The House asked for the delay so that businesses had time to get signs printed if they didn't want firearms in their establishment.
    Yeah but the only ones who would do that are the ones who voted against it. Those who voted against it are too stupid to think of that.

    Not to mention, I would put money on the fact that any restaurant that posts a sign doesn't do so correctly and legally.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by John Canuck View Post
    It will become law as soon as it's re-written as an act, signed by the Senate and the House, and walked over to the Governor's office and signed by her.

    I think she has five days to sign or veto an Act, or it becomes law anyway.
    The signing part from the House and Senate is a formality, right?

    I mean...there's no more debating on the Bill...it becomes an Act and goes to the Gov to sign, correct?

    and I can't see Gov Haley having an issue with the act...it was soundly passed.

  5. #394
    Quote Originally Posted by DLB1964 View Post
    The signing part from the House and Senate is a formality, right?

    I mean...there's no more debating on the Bill...it becomes an Act and goes to the Gov to sign, correct?

    and I can't see Gov Haley having an issue with the act...it was soundly passed.
    The House and the Senate signing the Act are part of the ratification process. They don't debate the Act.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by John Canuck View Post
    The House and the Senate signing the Act are part of the ratification process. They don't debate the Act.
    Thanks.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by John Canuck View Post
    It will become law as soon as it's re-written as an act, signed by the Senate and the House, and walked over to the Governor's office and signed by her.

    I think she has five days to sign or veto an Act, or it becomes law anyway.
    So 5 days meaning next Friday should be the latest?

  8. #397
    Quote Originally Posted by AndeyHall View Post
    So 5 days meaning next Friday should be the latest?
    once it gets to her as an act.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by jhodge83 View Post
    once it gets to her as an act.
    What all is involved in that?

  10. #399
    this is what i got from the scstatehouse.gov site...sorry about the formatting. the bold is where we should be now.

    For example, assume a Bill has been introduced in the House, debated, amended, adopted and sent to the Senate. If the Senate amends the House Bill, it is returned to the House for consideration. The House may agree or disagree with the Senate amendment or make changes to the Senate amendment and return it to the Senate. Should the House disagree with the Senate amendment, a message is sent to the Senate. The Senate will either insist upon or recede from their amendment. If the Senate insists upon its amendment, a message is sent to the House listing the names of three Senators appointed to a conference committee. The Speaker of the House then appoints three members of the House to a conference committee.

    The six members meet and try to reach an agreement. If they agree, their report is sent to both bodies for adoption. When the report is adopted by both bodies, the Bill is ordered enrolled for ratification. Should the conference committee not agree, they may return to their respective bodies and ask for free conference powers, which requires a two-thirds vote of each body. The free conference committee may rewrite the Bill. The conference committee cannot alter or delete anything agreed to by both bodies. If the bodies agree, the Bill is ordered enrolled for ratification and the title changed to an Act. Then the Bill is enrolled (rewritten into Act form by Legislative Council), placed in Act backs (folders), attached to the original version of the Bill, and returned to the body in which it originated to await ratification. When invited to ratify by the Senate, the Speaker, Clerk and Sergeant-at-Arms of the House go to the Senate Chamber to ratify Acts. During the ratification, the presiding officers and Clerks of the two bodies sign the Acts. The Acts are immediately sent to the Governor’s office by the Clerk of the Senate. The Governor has five days, Sundays excluded, during the session to approve or disapprove an Act. When he signs the Act or allows it to become Law without his signature, it is sent to the Secretary of State’s office to be filed permanently.

    If the Governor vetoes the Act, it must be returned with his veto message, to the Clerk of the body in which it originated, by midnight of the fifth day. That body may then consider the veto. If they override the Governor’s veto (this requires a two-thirds vote of the body’s members present and voting), then it is sent to the other body for its consideration (where it takes a two-thirds vote of the members present and voting to override the veto). Should either the House or the Senate not override the Governor’s veto, the Act is dead. If the
    two bodies override the veto, the Act is sent to the Secretary of State’s office and becomes law. The Act becomes effective on the 20th day after its approval by the Governor, unless some other effective date is specified in the legislation

  11. Quote Originally Posted by jhodge83 View Post
    this is what i got from the scstatehouse.gov site...sorry about the formatting.

    For example, assume a Bill has been introduced in the House, debated, amended, adopted and sent to the Senate. If the Senate amends the House Bill, it is returned to the House for consideration. The House may agree or disagree with the Senate amendment or make changes to the Senate amendment and return it to the Senate. Should the House disagree with the Senate amendment, a message is sent to the Senate. The Senate will either insist upon or recede from their amendment. If the Senate insists upon its amendment, a message is sent to the House listing the names of three Senators appointed to a conference committee. The Speaker of the House then appoints three members of the House to a conference committee.

    The six members meet and try to reach an agreement. If they agree, their report is sent to both bodies for adoption. When the report is adopted by both bodies, the Bill is ordered enrolled for ratification. Should the conference committee not agree, they may return to their respective bodies and ask for free conference powers, which requires a two-thirds vote of each body. The free conference committee may rewrite the Bill. The conference committee cannot alter or delete anything agreed to by both bodies. If the bodies agree, the Bill is ordered enrolled for ratification and the title changed to an Act. Then the Bill is enrolled (rewritten into Act form by Legislative Council), placed in Act backs (folders), attached to the original version of the Bill, and returned to the body in which it originated to await ratification. When invited to ratify by the Senate, the Speaker, Clerk and Sergeant-at-Arms of the House go to the Senate Chamber to ratify Acts. During the ratification, the presiding officers and Clerks of the two bodies sign the Acts. The Acts are immediately sent to the Governorís office by the Clerk of the Senate. The Governor has five days, Sundays excluded, during the session to approve or disapprove an Act. When he signs the Act or allows it to become Law without his signature, it is sent to the Secretary of Stateís office to be filed permanently.

    If the Governor vetoes the Act, it must be returned with his veto message, to the Clerk of the body in which it originated, by midnight of the fifth day. That body may then consider the veto. If they override the Governorís veto (this requires a two-thirds vote of the bodyís members present and voting), then it is sent to the other body for its consideration (where it takes a two-thirds vote of the members present and voting to override the veto). Should either the House or the Senate not override the Governorís veto, the Act is dead. If the
    two bodies override the veto, the Act is sent to the Secretary of Stateís office and becomes law. The Act becomes effective on the 20th day after its approval by the Governor, unless some other effective date is specified in the legislation
    Holy crap...so we're looking at summer time obviously?

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