What about nursing homes? - Page 2
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Thread: What about nursing homes?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndeyHall View Post
    All the medical procedures that are performed at nursing homes are also performed in people's homes on a regular basis as well. Does this mean if I'm giving myself prescription medication, or or giving myself an insulin shot, or putting in/taking out a catheter on myself (just hurts to think about, but somehow people do it), then I can't carry in my home as well? Or is it only considered a medical procedure if it's done by a CNA, nurse, or doctor of some sort?
    Being as you work in a nursing home, seeing people do these procedures regularly, and seeing the side of life where people do these procedures at home, has given a biased view what you consider normal.

    That's not a bad thing at all.

    I take care of my family much more than someone without medical experience. I've sutured myself and family. Even things such as splints seem normal to me. Stuff that most people would go to the hospital for I can take care of pretty well myself. That doesn't mean it's a normal household though, as normal as I feel it is.

    Some people can't even take care of a bloody nose without going to the hospital.

    Again though, I see the big difference between a nursing home and an assisted living home or normal home, is how well would the person be able to take care of themselves alone? Even just taking NTG could be too much for someone in a nursing home, which is done regularly at home.

    Yes I would definitely say a procedure done by an CNA, EMT, Paramedic, RN, MA, or MD etc would put it into a higher level of care automatically (especially legally). A nursing home always uses at least a CNA level to do anything.

    You should see if your work has a medical business license of some sort. That would clear things up a bit.
    “One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive one.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

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  3. #12
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    I thought in South Carolina that only medical practitioners are licensed to perform medical procedures for the public, i.e. MD, DDS, APN. As for CNA, MA, EMT, LPN, RN, etc they provide health and medical care, however, they can perform medical procedures under the supervision and direction of an MD.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by melloyello View Post
    I thought in South Carolina that only medical practitioners are licensed to perform medical procedures for the public, i.e. MD, DDS, APN. As for CNA, MA, EMT, LPN, RN, etc they provide health and medical care, however, they can perform medical procedures under the supervision and direction of an MD.
    Never heard that before but I'm not saying it couldn't be true. I'd have to look into it.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndeyHall View Post
    Never heard that before but I'm not saying it couldn't be true. I'd have to look into it.
    I spoke to my wife(RN), sister-in-law(RN) and 2 brothers-in-law(EMT) and they said the same thing, exception was emergencies.
    They also referred me to Nurse Practice Act, which may be slightly different from State to State,

    SC Code of Law: SECTION 40-33-34. Performance of delegated medical acts; qualifications; protocols; prescriptive authorization; anesthesia care.

    (B) An APRN is subject, at all times, to the scope and standards of practice established by the board-approved credentialing organization representing the specialty area of practice and shall function within the scope of practice of this chapter and must not be in violation of Chapter 47.

    (C)(1) A licensed nurse practitioner, certified nurse-midwife, or clinical nurse specialist must provide evidence of approved written protocols, as provided in this section. A licensed NP, CNM, or CNS performing delegated medical acts must do so under the general supervision of a licensed physician or dentist who must be readily available for consultation.

    Hope this helps...

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by melloyello View Post
    I spoke to my wife(RN), sister-in-law(RN) and 2 brothers-in-law(EMT) and they said the same thing, exception was emergencies.
    They also referred me to Nurse Practice Act, which may be slightly different from State to State,

    SC Code of Law: SECTION 40-33-34. Performance of delegated medical acts; qualifications; protocols; prescriptive authorization; anesthesia care.

    (B) An APRN is subject, at all times, to the scope and standards of practice established by the board-approved credentialing organization representing the specialty area of practice and shall function within the scope of practice of this chapter and must not be in violation of Chapter 47.

    (C)(1) A licensed nurse practitioner, certified nurse-midwife, or clinical nurse specialist must provide evidence of approved written protocols, as provided in this section. A licensed NP, CNM, or CNS performing delegated medical acts must do so under the general supervision of a licensed physician or dentist who must be readily available for consultation.

    Hope this helps...
    Good info. General supervision with consultation available didn't mean the doctor had to be in the room, at least in Oregon for paramedics. EMT's were not allowed to do procedures even under supervision per protocols.

    As long as medical control was available I could do medical procedures under a physicians orders, inside and outside of the hospital. That was written in our protocols. I'm wouldn't be surprised if SC protocols were similar.
    “One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive one.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

  7. Quote Originally Posted by melloyello View Post
    I spoke to my wife(RN), sister-in-law(RN) and 2 brothers-in-law(EMT) and they said the same thing, exception was emergencies.
    They also referred me to Nurse Practice Act, which may be slightly different from State to State,

    SC Code of Law: SECTION 40-33-34. Performance of delegated medical acts; qualifications; protocols; prescriptive authorization; anesthesia care.

    (B) An APRN is subject, at all times, to the scope and standards of practice established by the board-approved credentialing organization representing the specialty area of practice and shall function within the scope of practice of this chapter and must not be in violation of Chapter 47.

    (C)(1) A licensed nurse practitioner, certified nurse-midwife, or clinical nurse specialist must provide evidence of approved written protocols, as provided in this section. A licensed NP, CNM, or CNS performing delegated medical acts must do so under the general supervision of a licensed physician or dentist who must be readily available for consultation.

    Hope this helps...
    So is this supporting the fact that you CAN in fact carry at a nursing home?

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndeyHall View Post
    All the medical procedures that are performed at nursing homes are also performed in people's homes on a regular basis as well. Does this mean if I'm giving myself prescription medication, or or giving myself an insulin shot, or putting in/taking out a catheter on myself (just hurts to think about, but somehow people do it), then I can't carry in my home as well? Or is it only considered a medical procedure if it's done by a CNA, nurse, or doctor of some sort?
    Quote Originally Posted by AndeyHall View Post
    So is this supporting the fact that you CAN in fact carry at a nursing home?
    I was trying to show who can and cannot perform medical procedures.

    My statement was, if they are residents with legal possession of the property then I would think Section 16-23-20 should apply.
    It is their home, their guest & family have rights to the property.

    From South Carolina Senior Citizen's Handbook, "Residents’ Rights are guaranteed by the federal 1987 Nursing Home Reform Law and the S.C. Code Ann. § 44-81-20. These laws require that long-term care facilities “promote and protect the rights of each resident” and place a strong emphasis on individual dignity and self-determination. A person living in a longterm care facility maintains the same rights as an individual living in the community." .


    SECTION 16-23-20. Unlawful carrying of handgun; exceptions.
    (8) a person in his home or upon his real property or a person who has the permission of the owner or the person in legal possession or the person in legal control of the home or real property;

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