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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    somewhere in north texas
    Posts
    599

    Scotty..... I mean

    Festus, nowthat you are finished playin' around, we need the warp drive up and running!!!:D

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  3. #12
    Fire lightin is a hard thing to do. It certainly take patience and time. It took me 10 minutes to get a good ball of lite kindling. Bow drill still works the best for me. Two pieces of dry light wood, a round dowl or stick, a bow stick, and a shoelace. The bow and lace wrap around once on the dowl stick. One piece of dry wood on bottom one on top. You work the bow back and forth to round off all edges. Then you take a knife and pit out a place for the dowl to rest on both pieces of dry wood. One piece sits flat on the ground. The other piece you support with your hand the dowl sits in between. Work the dowl with the bow back and forth until you have a smooth rounded surface on the two pieces of wood and on both ends of the wood. You then take your knife and notch out rounded hole that sits on the ground so that part of the rounded pit is open to the air. You put the kindling whether it be dryer lint or in my case torn up newspaper and hay. (All I had around the place at the time). Here is a secret. Once you are at this point take your hand and rub your natural oils over the end of the dowl that sits under the wood on top under your hand. This keeps this side from smoking and forces all the friction you can to work on the bottom piece. Then you bow back and forth for about 5 minutes or so until you start getting the piece of wood smoking like crazy. The skill comes in figuring out when to slow the drill down by half when it gets hot enough. A deduction in speed and increase in force on the very hot and smoking wood causes embers to fall into the kindling. The hardest part for me and most, is getting those small tiny little glowing embers to light the kindling. It takes very hard blowing getting the embers bigger and bigger until they will cach and ignite. It is not a quick process and takes some time. But, fun to learn if you have the patience. I tried the hand drill this weekend, but my fumbly fingers can't get it going as fast as the bow drill. Sometime I will take photos of all this stuff and post it or something. But thats a general idea of the process.
    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    ---Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759.

  4. #13

    Bow Drill

    Quote Originally Posted by whiptrackercracker View Post
    Fire lightin is a hard thing to do. It certainly take patience and time. It took me 10 minutes to get a good ball of lite kindling. Bow drill still works the best for me. Two pieces of dry light wood, a round dowl or stick, a bow stick, and a shoelace. The bow and lace wrap around once on the dowl stick. One piece of dry wood on bottom one on top. You work the bow back and forth to round off all edges. Then you take a knife and pit out a place for the dowl to rest on both pieces of dry wood. One piece sits flat on the ground. The other piece you support with your hand the dowl sits in between. Work the dowl with the bow back and forth until you have a smooth rounded surface on the two pieces of wood and on both ends of the wood. You then take your knife and notch out rounded hole that sits on the ground so that part of the rounded pit is open to the air. You put the kindling whether it be dryer lint or in my case torn up newspaper and hay. (All I had around the place at the time). Here is a secret. Once you are at this point take your hand and rub your natural oils over the end of the dowl that sits under the wood on top under your hand. This keeps this side from smoking and forces all the friction you can to work on the bottom piece. Then you bow back and forth for about 5 minutes or so until you start getting the piece of wood smoking like crazy. The skill comes in figuring out when to slow the drill down by half when it gets hot enough. A deduction in speed and increase in force on the very hot and smoking wood causes embers to fall into the kindling. The hardest part for me and most, is getting those small tiny little glowing embers to light the kindling. It takes very hard blowing getting the embers bigger and bigger until they will cach and ignite. It is not a quick process and takes some time. But, fun to learn if you have the patience. I tried the hand drill this weekend, but my fumbly fingers can't get it going as fast as the bow drill. Sometime I will take photos of all this stuff and post it or something. But thats a general idea of the process.

    I may give it another try one weekend to see if I can get the hang of it.
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  5. #14
    Surviving is making it through another day, without falling for me, But as a Marine vet survival skillls are things everyone needs............. Semper Fi'
    Glock Carrier in SC.

    MufDady

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    somewhere in north texas
    Posts
    599

    survival skills is something everyone needs....

    + 1 . 1000% TOTAL agreement.

  7. #16
    Speaking of survival skills. I live in an area in Northern Utah that is due for the BIG EARTHQUAKE. We have not had a quake for years so, its assumed and predicted that one could hit and hit hard. This morning I was a bit slow on getting ready for the day and decided to crash on my bed for an hour to recoupe from a long night working on a project. I was awakened to my bed shifting ever so slightly back and forth as if someone was pushing on it. Of course my first natural inclination was that someone was in the room, but I quickly shifted to it being an earthquake. I figured it my be a pretremor to a ensuing bigger quake which I have seen happen in more faulty areas. Quickly I was in my shoes with bug out bag already on and heading down the stairs to get out of this tall building. The shifting stopped about halfway down the stairs but I decided to get my bag into the car just in case. It turned out to be a rather large quake in Nevada hundreds of miles away. However, it was a good test of my personal emergency broadcast system. The interesting thing to me was the lack of notice from anyone else in the building. A few noticed and kicked into survival mode, but a great deal did not even give it a second thought. These skills are not hard, granted I am not an expert on everything or anything. But, I think basic situational awareness goes a long way into keeping one safe. Anywho, just another test of my nerves
    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    ---Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759.

  8. #17
    Whip, I'm going after that bow fire this weekend when I go out to the range. Don't know how long I'll keep at it as I'll have my new Bushmaster and scope with me and that might be a bit more fun to play with.:D

  9. #18
    Good Luck...It takes patience. I'm sure I know what I would be doing at the range with that nice setup, and I'm sure it would not be firemaking. Unless your getting rid of some old gas cans :) Happy Bush Whacking!!!
    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    ---Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759.

  10. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,437
    Quote Originally Posted by festus View Post
    I ended up using a very useful survival skill this last weekend. Squirrels had chewed up the electrical and vacuum systems in my work car.
    As soon as you have a chance, you can use another survival skill, which involves a .22 rifle and a bird feeder full of corn. That will probably prevent further engine patch jobs - and as an added bonus, you can eat squirrel for a whole week. :)
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  11. #20

    Firemaking skills are critical to your outdoor survival

    Being able to make a fire under emergency situations can save your life. And not being able to make a fire can cost your life! Most of my outdoors activities involve snow, cold and remote places, so I'm really concerned about the most effective, and quick ways to get that flame going.
    A few years back, I did extensive research on what firemaking method is the best under all circumstances. If you'd like to read the story, check out:
    What fire ignition system should you carry?|Survival Common Sense
    All of us, obviously, believe a firearm is a necessary survival tool. But you can't use any tool if your fingers are numb and you're about to freeze to death!

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