Long term food storage
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Thread: Long term food storage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Florida Panhandle
    Posts
    3,098

    Exclamation Long term food storage

    this has got to come up sooner or later

    Canned goods are only good for about 2 1/2 years
    Dehydrated food is good as long as it is kept at zero humidity and does not show mold spores.
    MRE's are good for 7-12 years depending on the lot# and batch.
    Dry Grain is good as long as it does not sour or mold
    Bottled water is good for about a year
    Tap water untreated is good for about a month
    Tap water filtered is good for 2 weeks tops
    Canned soda is good for about 12-18 months
    Soda in glass bottles is good for about 2-5 years depending on conditions of storage/light
    FESTUS
    IN OMNIA PARATUS

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    somewhere in north texas
    Posts
    599

    a good source...

    LDSCatalog HTML REDIRECT
    has some great storage food at a good price. not a wide range, but it is there and it is good food. i am not a mormon and do not hold with their theology, but they got this right andare the go to folks on this subject!

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by festus View Post
    Bottled water is good for about a year
    Tap water untreated is good for about a month
    Tap water filtered is good for 2 weeks tops
    Actually bacteria free tap water stored in sealed containers (fill to the top--less air=better storage), in the dark (either dark room or opaque container) will last a very long time--some sources say indefinitely. If you're on a municipal water system, most of these treat the water before it gets to your tap, but to be sure you can treat with bleach, iodine, etc.

    Water can be stored in commercial water containers (think blue barrels) or in other hard plastic containers (like 2 liter pop bottles--not milk jugs). I use empty soda bottles, gatorade bottles, etc.--wash out real good before putting your water in it, fill to the top and screw the lid on tight. Then line the back wall of your closet with them or stuff them under the bed or in other nooks in your house.

    I had some tap water I did nothing to in one house we lived in in 2 liter bottles between the wall and my filing cabinet in a south east corner room with lots of windows and the water was still good when we moved 2 years later. Dark places would be better, but don't let a lack of darkness keep you from storing some water.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Florida Panhandle
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    We are on municipal water

    we are on municpal water...but every time I check a drop of it...I find floaties in the microsope. Nothing bad but enough to make me question long term water quality. I would still rather have a good well and a solar powered pump or hand pump.
    FESTUS
    IN OMNIA PARATUS

  6. #5
    Store the food in as cool a place as you can. Heat is the enemy with food and also by the way ammo.
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by HK4U View Post
    Store the food in as cool a place as you can. Heat is the enemy with food and also by the way ammo.
    As cool a place as you can is exactly right. Cooler is better, but don't let the lack of a perfect cool/dark place to store your food/water keep you from storing anything. I've seen end tables made of cases of canned goods with a board on top and a tablecloth over it, and when I was a kid we had a bookcase made of boards and #10 cans of wheat. A lot of people probably have a good place they can put food/water/ammo, but even a single person in a little apartment can get creative.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by mom of 3 angels View Post
    As cool a place as you can is exactly right. Cooler is better, but don't let the lack of a perfect cool/dark place to store your food/water keep you from storing anything. I've seen end tables made of cases of canned goods with a board on top and a tablecloth over it, and when I was a kid we had a bookcase made of boards and #10 cans of wheat. A lot of people probably have a good place they can put food/water/ammo, but even a single person in a little apartment can get creative.
    As the saying goes, "necessity is the motherhood of invention". Or something like that.
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wesley Chapel NC
    Posts
    270

    FEMA water storage

    FEMA has actually put out some good info on water storage. FEMA: Water

    If You are Preparing Your Own Containers of Water

    It is recommended you purchase food-grade water storage containers from surplus or camping supplies stores to use for water storage. Before filling with water, thoroughly clean the containers with dishwashing soap and water, and rinse completely so there is no residual soap. Follow directions below on filling the container with water.

    If you choose to use your own storage containers, choose two-liter plastic soft drink bottles not plastic jugs or cardboard containers that have had milk or fruit juice in them. Milk protein and fruit sugars cannot be adequately removed from these containers and provide an environment for bacterial growth when water is stored in them. Cardboard containers also leak easily and are not designed for long-term storage of liquids. Also, do not use glass containers, because they can break and are heavy.

    If storing water in plastic soda bottles, follow these steps
    Thoroughly clean the bottles with dishwashing soap and water, and rinse completely so there is no residual soap.Sanitize the bottles by adding a solution of 1 teaspoon of non-scented liquid household chlorine bleach to a quart of water. Swish the sanitizing solution in the bottle so that it touches all surfaces. After sanitizing the bottle, thoroughly rinse out the sanitizing solution with clean water.


    Filling Water Containers

    Fill the bottle to the top with regular tap water. If the tap water has been commercially treated from a water utility with chlorine, you do not need to add anything else to the water to keep it clean. If the water you are using comes from a well or water source that is not treated with chlorine, add two drops of non-scented liquid household chlorine bleach to the water.Tightly close the container using the original cap. Be careful not to contaminate the cap by touching the inside of it with your finger. Place a date on the outside of the container so that you know when you filled it. Store in a cool, dark place.Replace the water every six months if not using commercially bottled water.

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