Nuclear Biological Chemical
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  1. Nuclear Biological Chemical

    I was watching the Unit the other day, and the episode was about a Chlorine strike, sorry if you haven't watched it yet. It made me think, that these "soldiers" were trained to recognize the type of attack, which allowed them to respond. Does anyone know of any good resources that describe what to look for, how to respond, and how to treat various related ailments. I have been in NYC during the blackout and 9/11, and it reminded me about the threats NYC faces. Thanks in advance.

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  3. #2
    The best responce for the untrained and unequipped to to evacuate to a safe distance. which is not a distance in which you can observe from in my opinion due to the fact that the wind can change directions without notice. also here are some sites that that may be informative.

    HTTP//:phmsa.dot.gov./hazmat/library/erp

    Chemtrec Homepage

    HTTP://deploymenthealthlibrary.fhp.o...0gas20(300)pdf

  4. #3
    As far as responding putting on a gas mask would be in order.
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  5. #4
    When I went through EMT training in the late 80's we were taught to use "cop'o'meters" and the "Rule of thumb" when dispatched to hazmat situations. "Cop'o'meters" were LEOs at the scene of the spill or whatever. If they were vertical & breathing, it was 'probably' safe to enter the scene. And for fire or gas dispersals, if your thumb, on your outstretched arm, did not cover the whole scene, you were too close. I have, in my nearly 30 years of experience since then, never had either system fail me in an emergency. If LEO or FD need assistance, they have EMS in the back. If EMS needs help, TSHTF, and there ain't nobody left...
    N38 19' 56.52" W85 45' 8.56"
    Semper Gumby
    Ethics are what we do when no one else is looking.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by starbasessd View Post
    When I went through EMT training in the late 80's we were taught to use "cop'o'meters" and the "Rule of thumb" when dispatched to hazmat situations. "Cop'o'meters" were LEOs at the scene of the spill or whatever. If they were vertical & breathing, it was 'probably' safe to enter the scene. And for fire or gas dispersals, if your thumb, on your outstretched arm, did not cover the whole scene, you were too close. I have, in my nearly 30 years of experience since then, never had either system fail me in an emergency. If LEO or FD need assistance, they have EMS in the back. If EMS needs help, TSHTF, and there ain't nobody left...
    Dont remember them calling them cop'o'meters but was trained the same principle. when you get to the EMS needing help time to call the neighboring juristiction for mutual aid with a stern warning to dawn SCBA before approaching the scene.cause if they get overcome you know you are doomed

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Florida Panhandle
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    Exclamation Chemical indicators

    If you notice small dead animals you are someplace NOT GOOD. Leave by shortest route possible. Walk at a 90 degree angle to the wind if possible to back the way you came. If your chest is tight and your eyes are dilating, you have just seconds to administer your combo auto ejectors with out which you ain't gonna make it. These only buy you time for proper medical attention. The auto injectors are Diazipam and 2pam-chloride. Followed up by proper medical care you you should live with a quality of life I can only describe as appalling. That is Nerve agent in a nutshell. Blister on the other hand is a much worse way to go. Your skin blisters under intense pain and your lungs blister from the inside out and then you drown in your own juices.
    Blood agents turn you lungs into jelly and your blood into a rubbery substance but is the least persistent chemical agent.

    You will not feel or smell or taste radiation. It will do very bad things to you at the cellular level and cancer is the long term side effect. Radiation poisoning is a very ugly way to go. k-19 Widomaker came closest to portraying radiation burns. An older movie "the day after" came closest to portraying radiation poisoning by strontium-90.

    Biological is for sure the scariest thing out there. pick a disease, mutate it to be cure resistant, infect a food source, water source or common animals and look out.
    FESTUS
    IN OMNIA PARATUS

  8. #7
    wolfhunter Guest
    A nice tool is the WISER program on a PDA or laptop. Chemicals can be identified by the DOT placard 4 digit "UN" number, with good probability based on their physical characteristics, or by the symptoms demonstrated. The map function gives a MapQuest-type map with the evacuation area marked once a chemical and spill site are identified, and wind direction is selected. There are also good biological and radioactive sections.

    WISER Home

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by wolfhunter View Post
    A nice tool is the WISER program on a PDA or laptop. Chemicals can be identified by the DOT placard 4 digit "UN" number, with good probability based on their physical characteristics, or by the symptoms demonstrated. The map function gives a MapQuest-type map with the evacuation area marked once a chemical and spill site are identified, and wind direction is selected. There are also good biological and radioactive sections.

    WISER Home
    Thanks for the link....great info.
    "An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life."
    -- Robert A. Heinlein, Beyond This Horizon, 1942

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    i have my m-17A1 with new filters

  11. #10
    wolfhunter Guest
    Free courses are offered here: Emergency Management Institute - FEMA Independent Study Program

    and

    Alpha Disaster Contingencies has some good reading materials

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