Ammo Bill Hits Georgia


SB 12 has started through the Georgia Senate. This is the same basic bill being introduced in several states requiring serial numbers on ammunition before it can be sold. Maybe it's time to start writing your reps.

Georgia General Assembly - SB 12
 

I wonder what motivated this guy to introduce such a bill. I'm glad that there were no co-sponsors to the absurd legislation.

I'll be sending a letter to the senator this afternoon.



gf
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
A couple of years ago, I would have said that there was no way this bill would pass. However, in the current political climate, which unfortunately heavily favors Democrats riding the coattails of Obama, I can no longer say that. Let's just hope that legislators see this bill for what it really is and give it the defeat it deserves.
 

{TEX}Hawaii((

New member
I've been wondering about this one. I am not sure to the specifics. Is the intent to find a bullet casing on the ground and then be able to link it back to the individual who purchased the bullet? Who would be the holder of this information?
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
I've been wondering about this one. I am not sure to the specifics. Is the intent to find a bullet casing on the ground and then be able to link it back to the individual who purchased the bullet? Who would be the holder of this information?

My guess is that under the bill, the process for purchasing ammo would be just like the process for purchasing firearms, and that the same agencies responsible for keeping track of firearm sales within the state (if there are any) would now also be responsible for keeping track of ammo purchases too. Obviously, this could prove problematic because with this being a state law, and not a federal one, this means that because there are no federal agencies responsible for doing this, a new agency would have to be created in the state to do this.
 

{TEX}Hawaii((

New member
I've been reading more about this bill and it seems it might just be a way for the state to apply an additional tax to ammunition....looks like it comes down to revenue.
 
I've been reading more about this bill and it seems it might just be a way for the state to apply an additional tax to ammunition....looks like it comes down to revenue.

That's not entirely true. If you read the parts about "given or lent" it is a way of tracking ammo. As follows:

16-11-191.(a) On and after January 1, 2010, all handgun ammunition manufactured in this state, sold or offered for sale in this state, imported into this state for sale or personal use, kept for sale in this state, or given, lent, or possessed in this state shall be coded by the manufacturer of the ammunition in accordance with the rules and regulations of the department.(b) Not later than January 1, 2012, all noncoded handgun ammunition, whether owned by private citizens or commercial entities, shall be disposed of in accordance with the rules and regulations of the department.

16-11-192.(a) Not later than January 1, 2010, the department shall establish and maintain an ammunition coding system data base.(b) All manufacturers of handgun ammunition shall register with the department in a manner prescribed by the department by rule or regulation and shall maintain records on the business premises of the manufacturer for a period of seven years concerning all sales, loans, and transfers of handgun ammunition to, from, or within this state.
 

gogriz91

Torch Wielding Villager
Only place this bill stands a chance is in states like Kalifornia, NY, IL, MA etc. Can't imagine it'll get much support where common sense reigns supreme.
 

CA CCWInstructor

New member
Only place this bill stands a chance is in states like Kalifornia, NY, IL, MA etc. Can't imagine it'll get much support where common sense reigns supreme.

California already has it. Effective 2010. The nice thing is the law says the technology must be unencumbered, it's not. One company holds the patent, they are not releasing it. So our ammo is fine.
 
W

wolfhunter

Guest
California already has it. Effective 2010. The nice thing is the law says the technology must be unencumbered, it's not. One company holds the patent, they are not releasing it. So our ammo is fine.

Really hate to say this, but this bill is NOT the microstamping issue whereby a firearm will stamp an identifying mark on fired cases. This bill requires the manufacturer to mark Ammo (not just the box) with a Lot Number and requiring the buyer to Sign For the ammo by Lot Number. The database refered to will track ammo from Manufacturer to Retailer to Buyer. If a Lot Number you signed for is later found on a bullet at a crime scene, "you got some 'splainin to do." Also, "THEY" will know exactly how much ammo, in what calibers, you bought; and when you got it. Since the bill includes ammo that is "lent", we will need to track how many rounds we shot at the range, who we gave that old box of "a caliber I no longer own" to.

Oh, yeah, that 5K round stash you have for SHTF day? You'll have to turn it in with little or no renumeration.
 

{TEX}Hawaii((

New member
Yep. I am hoping this one does not get passes otherwise I will have to shoot all my ammo at the range before the law takes effect.
 
We were able to get a similar bill here in PRHI killed. The guy who introduced it is no longer in office. I doubt that it will be revived this session. I'm sure that the people of GA will be able to defeat the measure. It's a really silly concept. Too many variables to make it a viable piece of legislation. One of the key points I used when talking to legislators was that it's very difficult to place a serial number on #7.5 bird shot. When they asked what I was talking about, I showed them a sample of said bird shot and the stats of the Taurus Judge in my Taurus catalog. Sad part was that there was a large number of people testifying against the measure, including the Honolulu Police Chief. Only testimony in favor was from a representative of the manufacturer of the device.

It amazes me what people will do to make a buck. :nono:



gf
 

Jay

New member
Encoded ammunition is an attempt by a west coast company to make big bucks at gun owners expense. A similar bill Introduced in Indiana never made it out of committee....... This is from an internet blog..... not mine...

Ammunition Coding System (Ammo Coding :: About Us) was established by three Seattle entrepeneurs to market a technology that would identify any bullet fired from any gun. It involves etching an identifying code onto the base of the bullet, so that after it's recovered from a crime scene, the code can be read by forensic detectives. Their idea is that every box of ammunition sold in the USA would be registered to the purchaser by means of this code, and the fired bullet could thus be linked to the person who bought it. ACS claims that this would be a valuable crime-fighting tool.

Now comes the interesting bit. The founders of ACS have patented their technology, but they can't seem to get any ammunition manufacturers to implement it, apparently because of the costs involved. They've therefore come up with what I consider an underhanded, devious scheme to force the use of their patent, and foist the costs involved onto us - the bullet-buying public.

They've formed an organization called Ammunition Accountability. This organization is nothing more or less than a front for ACS and its founders. It's trying to promote ACS's technology, and is sponsoring legislation in as many States as it can manage, trying to mandate the use of that technology on ammunition sold in those States. So far, no State has passed any law to that effect: but efforts to do so are under way in Alabama, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee and Washington. If your State isn't listed, don't worry: it'll be coming your way soon!

Key points of their proposed legislation (taken from their Web site) are:
· All handgun and assault weapon ammunition manufactured or sold in the state after a given date must be coded by the manufacturer. Furthermore, not later than a subsequent date, usually no more than two years after the adoption of the coding requirement, all non-coded ammunition in the possession of businesses or private individuals must be disposed of. (There goes your ammo stash, friends.)
· The State concerned would have to designate or establish an agency to keep track of ammunition sales, and all ammo vendors would have to register with that agency, log the identity of any and every purchaser of ammunition, and supply those details to the agency.
· All costs involved would be funded by a levy on the price of ammunition. Their sample legislation gives a proposed figure of $0.005 per round of ammunition. That translates to one-tenth of a cent on a box of 20 rounds, or one-quarter of a cent on a box of 50 rounds.

That levy sounds minor, doesn't it? Suuurre . . . but when you get to crunching the numbers, things start to look rather more rosy for ACS. Current figures are hard to come by, but in 1992, according to an ACS press release, "approximately 5.4 billion bullets were sold in the US alone." (I understand this excludes military and export sales.) At a rate of $0.005 per bullet, the revenues from sales of such ammunition - if it were coded - would amount to about $27,000,000. The actual figure might well be considerably higher, for two reasons. First, ammo sales have risen since 1992, although I don't know the exact numbers. Second, if you think that ammo manufacturers or retailers are going to bother to put a $0.005 charge per bullet on their books, think again! They'll probably add a dollar or two to the price of each box of ammo, and blame it on the bullet coding costs, while pocketing the extra profit.

So, if we take that 1992 figure of 5.4 billion bullets, and package them into boxes, we'll get a better picture. I'm informed that about two-thirds of retail ammo sales are in 20-round boxes, and one-third in 50-round boxes. If that's the case, applying it to the total number of bullets sold in 1992 gives us sales of about 180 million 20-round boxes, and about 36 million 50-round boxes, or 216 million boxes of ammo in total. If the manufacturers and retailers slap on an extra dollar per box, which I think is very likely, that's $216,000,000 more that you and I will be paying for ammo. How much of it will end up in ACS's pocket is anyone's guess.

We'd also be saddled with another State bureaucracy, gathering information about us. What's the bet that it'll cost more than the ammo levies bring in? And who makes up the shortfall? That's right - you and I, the taxpayers. What about the effect on our privacy? Do you want your personal details recorded every time you buy a box of .22 ammo for plinking? Darned if I do . . .

There you have it. A company wants to impose greater costs, greater State-level government bureaucracy, and an intrusive, privacy-invading tracking system on us, solely for the sake of its own profit. Safety be damned! I'll wager these guys aren't remotely interested in safety. They can hear the ka-Ching! of cash registers, and their mouths are watering. In essence, they're trying to persuade our State legislators to force us to make them rich.

I urge all everyone to watch for proposals for similar legislation in their States. If you see something like this rear its ugly head, I urge you to write to your State legislators, pointing out the drawbacks to this scheme, and questioning whether the State should legally allow one company to enrich itself at the expense of your State's already hard-pressed taxpayers. This needs to be exposed for the money-grab that it is, and resisted at every step. If we don't, we'll be paying a lot more, and our already-threadbare right to privacy will be even further damaged.

I'd be grateful if you'd please publicize this issue yourselves, either by posting a link to this article on your blogs, or writing your own. I've included links to the main Web sites concerned, so you can research the subject for yourselves. Let's make sure that all our shooting readers are aware of this threat, and mobilized to oppose it.
 

tattedupboy

Thank God I'm alive!
California already has it. Effective 2010. The nice thing is the law says the technology must be unencumbered, it's not. One company holds the patent, they are not releasing it. So our ammo is fine.

My message to you is to move, and move quickly. You're right next to NV, so why don't you move there, where you don't have to worry about such ridiculousness?
 

jmcrooks

New member
I was not talking about reloading to sell to others. I was asking how would it effect getting supplies to reload for personel uses.
 
I was not talking about reloading to sell to others. I was asking how would it effect getting supplies to reload for personel uses.

I wonder some about that myself. Because "all non-coded handgun ammunition" must be used or destroyed by the cut off date. Does this mean that loaders for handgun ammunition will have to have an coding system? The wording makes that a possible requirement, as shown:

16-11-191.
(a) On and after January 1, 2010, all handgun ammunition manufactured in this state, sold or offered for sale in this state, imported into this state for sale or personal use, kept for sale in this state, or given, lent, or possessed in this state shall be coded by the manufacturer of the ammunition in accordance with the rules and regulations of the department.
(b) Not later than January 1, 2012, all noncoded handgun ammunition, whether owned by private citizens or commercial entities, shall be disposed of in accordance with the rules and regulations of the department.
 

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