Concealed Carry While Walking Dogs


lukem

Administrator
Staff member
For those of you that have dogs, I'm curious if you try to always have one hand free to draw while you are walking them. I never thought about this much until I got a second dog. Until recently when I got the retractable leaches, both hands were always full. At least with the retractable I can put them both in one hand and leave my strong side free.

Well I'm watching my friend's two dogs for a few days which makes 4 over here right now. Talk about a zoo! Anyway, I think I'm just going to walk two at a time instead of all four this way I can still have a hand free.
 

crazycathed

New member
this is the very reason I am training to shoot one handed.I don't own a dog but if I'm carrying something and have to draw and shoot one handed it's nice to know I've practiced for it.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
this is the very reason I am training to shoot one handed.I don't own a dog but if I'm carrying something and have to draw and shoot one handed it's nice to know I've practiced for it.

Yea, I normally fire one handed and weak handed when I go to the range. We also had some training exercises at Front Sight in the classes I've taken.
 

rrc1962

New member
I suppose I'd just drop the leash if I had to draw and didn't have a free hand. One bonus might be that just about all people are afraid of a barking dog, unless it's one of those designer pocket dogs. That might buy you a few seconds and the BG processes that. could give you an advantage. We have a 180lb Saint Bernard who is a big teddy bear, but when he sees a stranger approaching, he barks and puts on a big act. A BG would probably think twice after seeing 180lbs of snarling mean-ness coming at him. He has actually chased off intruders trying to break into the cars and garage on two occasions.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
Dropping the leash would probably be my last resort. I wouldn't want one of them getting hurt either. One is a little beagle that wouldn't do anything. The other is half lab and pitt. She can sounds a little scary when she barks, not sure what she would do if something happened to me like that though, don't really want to find out. Its good having her when I was too because she's like an alarm. She'll hear stuff and look before I know its there.
 

rrc1962

New member
Dropping the leash would probably be my last resort. I wouldn't want one of them getting hurt either. One is a little beagle that wouldn't do anything. The other is half lab and pitt. She can sounds a little scary when she barks, not sure what she would do if something happened to me like that though, don't really want to find out. Its good having her when I was too because she's like an alarm. She'll hear stuff and look before I know its there.

With our Saint dropping the leash is almost the only option. It would be impossible to keep him under control and maintain any control of a firearm. When he goes after something, it takes both hands to hold him back. If something like that ever happened, all I could hope for is that I can get a shot off before the BG can take a shot at my dog.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
With our Saint dropping the leash is almost the only option. It would be impossible to keep him under control and maintain any control of a firearm. When he goes after something, it takes both hands to hold him back. If something like that ever happened, all I could hope for is that I can get a shot off before the BG can take a shot at my dog.

188 lbs is more than both of mine put together! I think Nola (lab/pitt) is about 45lbs.
 

PascalFleischman

New member
Drop the leash and use both hands. My dog's smart enough (gun shy, that is) to run at the sound of trouble. You can chase your dog down, but you can't reclaim your life.
 

PascalFleischman

New member
My name is Leroy, and I'm 35 lbs. of 1/2 Pug & 1/2 Beagle, but 100% pure wuss. I'd turn my curly tail under and run as far away as possible.

Leroy.jpg
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
Cute dog. I'll see if I can snatch a pic of all 4 of them while I've got them. They are running the house at the moment. But they are all having fun.
 
Another option....

Yes, I do love the doggies! :happy:

First, get rid of those retractable leashes, Lukem. They are not strong enough to control a dog if something goes down. Also, if they are attached to collars instead of harnesses, the constant pressure on their trachea can cause damage. A good, strong leash, 4-6 feet, with a leash coupler would be a better way to go. Since it sounds like there is a size disparity, you might consider one of these:

Double Leash

While you have the zoo effect going on, maybe one of these:

Add A Dog Leash Connectors and Couplers

Walking multiple dogs on leash is not too difficult, once you get the hang of it. The first time you walk them together, pay attention to their pack order, and then leash them in the same order. Even better, find somewhere within walking distance, or perhaps a short drive away, where you can walk them off leash. If you have one or more who won't obey off-leash, I would recommend purchasing an electronic correction collar and investing a little time in training off-leash. One thing that I did before ever putting a correction collar on any of my dogs was to put it on and try it. That way I understood exactly what was happening when I press that button. On the mildest levels, it simply tingles. In fact, I never used that level because it was almost pleasant, kind of like the stim machine at a chiropractors office. The next level is just like walking on carpet with wool socks. A simple and effective static shock.

The net result would be either not having them on the leash, or being able to drop the leash, comfortable that they are still under your control. With the leash couplers, you can at least hold a single leash on your weak side while maintaining control. In fact, even though I only have one dog right now, he knows that he may only walk on my weak (left) side. I never switch the leash to my draw side.

Sounds like you are having fun! Woof! :sarcastic:
 

Red Hat

New member
I have the same problem, not walking my dog but when I'm using my wheelchair. The controls are on the right side so it keeps my right hand busy. I'm going to change my controls over to the left side. It probably take a few days to get use to it but will be worth it in the long run.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
I may look into those double leaches. The retractable ones I have seem pretty sturdy actually. They aren't big dogs so I'm not worried about them breaking it.
 

rrc1962

New member
188 lbs is more than both of mine put together! I think Nola (lab/pitt) is about 45lbs.


When I lived in NH, I had our Saint tied out on a 30 foot cable. The cable was attached to the covered porch. One day he took off after something in the yard and hit the end of the cable at full speed. He pulled the entire porch 3" out of square. The porch was resting on concrete footings and shifted 3". If he's on a leash and he bolts it takes everything I have to hold him back, and I'm 250lbs.
 
Another idea, Red!

I have the same problem, not walking my dog but when I'm using my wheelchair. The controls are on the right side so it keeps my right hand busy. I'm going to change my controls over to the left side. It probably take a few days to get use to it but will be worth it in the long run.

Instead of moving the controls, lets just put a turbo motor on the chair and connect a nitrous system. Push the button and zooooooommmmm.....

:biggrin:
 

gdcleanfun

Banned
When I lived in NH, I had our Saint tied out on a 30 foot cable. The cable was attached to the covered porch. One day he took off after something in the yard and hit the end of the cable at full speed. He pulled the entire porch 3" out of square. The porch was resting on concrete footings and shifted 3". If he's on a leash and he bolts it takes everything I have to hold him back, and I'm 250lbs.

Sounds to me as if your heavy-duty dog could use some heavy-duty training. The words "come," "sit," "down" & "stay" comes to mind. :biggrin: That said, here's a joke I heard forever ago: What does a huge dog say when it's prowling down an alley in the middle of the night? "Here kitty, kitty, kitty..."
 

rrc1962

New member
Sounds to me as if your heavy-duty dog could use some heavy-duty training. The words "come," "sit," "down" & "stay" comes to mind. :biggrin: That said, here's a joke I heard forever ago: What does a huge dog say when it's prowling down an alley in the middle of the night? "Here kitty, kitty, kitty..."

I wish. We tried that. The breed is stubborn by nature. We got him when he was 2 and his previous family never trained him. He knows all the basics, but when somethings got him distracted he won't pay attention.
 

johnsonabq

New member
Walking my dogs will pretty much mean I'll never need my gun. :no: But if so... I'll just let go and aim well! :laugh:
 

toreskha

Titles are un-American.
Dropping the leash would probably be my last resort. I wouldn't want one of them getting hurt either. One is a little beagle that wouldn't do anything. The other is half lab and pitt. She can sounds a little scary when she barks, not sure what she would do if something happened to me like that though, don't really want to find out. Its good having her when I was too because she's like an alarm. She'll hear stuff and look before I know its there.
If you have to draw, that's a good indication it's time to drop the leash. Not having good aim may well mean that you or someone else could die. On the other hand, dropping the leash will probably have one of four possible outcomes, in order of probability:

1. The dog will split and you can catch it later. You have a good reason, if you were about to get robbed. The owner can be comforted by the fact that their canine is intelligent, if not particularly loyal.

2. The dog will just stand there like an idiot.

3. An aggressive dog will attack the perp and successfully scare or slightly injure him, in which case its owner will probably be pleased with its heroism and tell their friends.

4. An aggressive dog will attack the perp and at worst get killed, in which case its owner will probably be pleased with its heroism, give it a funeral and end up on the news. You can't reasonably be held to blame, as the dog took a bullet for you.

If someone has to bite the big one early, I'd really rather it be Fido. I'll go to 100 doggy funerals to avoid having to attend one of my own or my family/friends. That's why LEOs have K-9s.
 

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