Equipment questions


magicman007

New member
I'm thinking about reloading my own ammo. I want to reload 9mm and .223. I'm looking at the Lee equipment, and specifically the Pro 100 and Load Master kits. My questions are:

1) What is the difference between the two kits?
2) Is one better than the other for a novice reloader (bearing in mind my two desired calibers)?
3) CAN I load both calibers on either/both of these kits?
4) Is switching calibers relatively easy with these kits?
5) What other equipment will I need to get started (other than the kit and a bench)?

All help is appreciated. I look forward to hearing what everyone has to say.
 

I'm thinking about reloading my own ammo. I want to reload 9mm and .223. I'm looking at the Lee equipment, and specifically the Pro 100 and Load Master kits. My questions are:

1) What is the difference between the two kits?
2) Is one better than the other for a novice reloader (bearing in mind my two desired calibers)?
3) CAN I load both calibers on either/both of these kits?
4) Is switching calibers relatively easy with these kits?
5) What other equipment will I need to get started (other than the kit and a bench)?

All help is appreciated. I look forward to hearing what everyone has to say.

There's a lot of equipment that you will need to reload. Here's what I can think of off hand:

Reload bench
Reload Press
Load chart from a competent source. Find the most common info available.
Dies for the calibers you're reloading and case lube
Case trimmer
Powder measure
Brass tumbler with proper media and case polish
Reload trays
Reload boxes (You can save factory ammo boxes, but be sure to label properly)
Bullet puller (in the event that you notice a mistake in loading or have ammo that you want to recycle components from)

I haven't done any serious reloading in a while, so I may have left out a few items. I'm sure the other members will be able to help you out.

Happy reloading.


gf
 

magicman007

New member
GF, thanks for the reply. I'm more interested in the specifics of the two press kits I listed than a generic list of supplies though. I want to know which of these two kits would be better for a novice and then what other equipment I'll need to go along with that kit. I understand I need a press and a bench, and each kit comes with one die set for either caliber. So those things I already understand. Thanks for the list of other equipment too. But how about the kits? What are the pros and cons of each and which would be better suited to my purposes?
 
Looks like the "Loadmaster" will be more versitile. Should you decide to reload larger "mag" rifle calibers in the future. Lee makes excellent equipment. Very user friendly, and good quality.

I've used Dillon, Lee and RCBS equipment. I prefer the Lee and RCBS because a lot of their dies are interchangeable.

According to the Lee website, both kits have just about everything you need to start reloading within minutes of bolting the press to the reload bench.



gf
 

Thoth8

New member
i have the lee pro 100 I can really pump out rounds of 9m.
As for 223 i dont know. Thier are some rifle rounds the the lee pro can not reload ( to small) i would call lee and talk to them to make sure it can reload .223 before i go any farther.
 

Red Hat

New member
I believe you are referring to the 1000 pro vs the load Master. I have the pro 1000 and it's a good press. I'd go with the Load Master kit. It's a heavier built press and it will cover a lot more calibers than the 1000.
 

willyNH

New member
I concur with redhat. I have the pro1000 and use it only for pistol calibers. I do not have a progressive for rifle stuff.

You can reload .223 on the pro 1000. However, you cannot case feed. This is a minor detail but I believe you can with the loadmaster.

If this is the very beginning of your reloading hobby, make sure you take it SLOW when you start out. While I like the pro 1000, it is not the easiest thing to set up. Make sure you have a good scale and a set of mics. Use a published load. Do not rush. Make only good ammunition. Label it well.

I always try to use a powder such that the case is obviously overful if I manage to double charge it. I have never done it, but I know that I cannot make a double charge round unless I am completely negligent. I use Unique for 9mm by the way, but there are other powders (cleaner too) that will achieve the same result.

-Matt
 

magicman007

New member
Thanks all for the replies. I appreciate them.

I am speaking of the pro 1000. Sorry, my keyboard stuck and didn't type the extra "0" and I didn't realize it.

I've done some reaseach of the Lee presses and found that the Pro 1000 actaully will reload the .223, but the charging die wouldn't be carbide. Does that make a big difference?

What I'm thinking of doing is getting the pro 1000 in 9mm as a kit, and then add the .223 over the next few months............my ar parts won't be here intil the end of February or so anyway. That way, I can start reloading my 9mm's now.

Now, a coupld other questions:

What powder should I start with? Does brand of primer matter? And if so, which ones are best?

I'm going to order a reloading book from Amazon next, so I'll start reading up as sson as I get it. I'm starting to get excited about this now.
 

DrDavidM

New member
I've done some reaseach of the Lee presses and found that the Pro 1000 actaully will reload the .223, but the charging die wouldn't be carbide. Does that make a big difference?



Now, a coupld other questions:

What powder should I start with? Does brand of primer matter? And if so, which ones are best?

I'm going to order a reloading book from Amazon next, so I'll start reading up as sson as I get it. I'm starting to get excited about this now.

Carbide dies are much nicer. You do not have to lubricate the case. However, none of my rifle dies are carbide. Only my handgun. I don't recall Lee offering carbide rifle dies.
I usually use Hodgdon powder. That's just because it seems to be in largest supply with my dealer. Just find one that says it will work with 223 caliber. There are obviously a few different size primers, but i have used Federal, Winchester, CCI and never had an issue with any of them.
 

Red Hat

New member
Carbide rifle dies are very expensive. I use a spray case lube on mine and I reload 223 and 223x6mm on my 1000 using standard dies. My 1000 also feeds 223 brass fine. I bought the 6 tube adapter for brass feed for mine. The only problem with the 1000 is the primer system. Once you get it adjusted correctly it will work fine for a while until one turns sideways. A dental pick and compressed air for blowing powder out of the index is a must.
 

magicman007

New member
I took the leap yesterday! I bought the Load Master along with some other accessories from Midway (they had the 9mm kit for $215) and got powder and primers from powder valley. I just need to get a brass washer/medium and a stand and I think I should be ready to go! Thanks again for the help in the decisoin. I'm sure I'll have many more questions as time goes on about this new hobby. :biggrin:
 

LVLouisCyphre

Obama is a mack daddy!
Missed this thread.

I have used only RCBS. I have an original Rock Chucker I still use. The reason I choose the Rock Chucker is that it's upgradable to a progressive with a Piggyback conversion kit. The only thing I don't like about the original Rock Chucker is that it will only handle rounds up to .223 Remington in length; basically any round that can fed through a magazine any standard AR-15 lower. The second generation Rock Chucker can handle longer cartridges. Fortunately the longest caliber firearm I own is 5.45x39mm.

If I was going into reloading and wanted a strictly progressive press, I would either go with Dillon or a Hornady Lock-N-Load AP.

As for dies, if I am not mistaken, the are all interchangeable and use the same thread so they are interchangeable between die makers. I have yet to hear of a press that cannot handle multiple calibers. However, you may have an issue with some equipment handling longer rifle calibers such as .308 Winchester/7.62 NATO.

Reloading requires patience and diligence.
 

KimberPB

New member
Here is the tumbler I have used for the past 2 years or so. Good price and works great.

Cabela's Case Tumbler

Also, to save some money go to pet store and they will have crushed walnut for bird cages. You can by a hugh bag for about the price of a couple pounds of reloading media. The walnet works great for cleaning the brass. It won't put a really shinny polish like the polish treated corn cob does but clean brass is all you really need.

Enjoy your new hobbie! Now get to the range and start whoring that brass!! lol
 

Red Hat

New member
Missed this thread.

I have used only RCBS. I have an original Rock Chucker I still use. The reason I choose the Rock Chucker is that it's upgradable to a progressive with a Piggyback conversion kit. The only thing I don't like about the original Rock Chucker is that it will only handle rounds up to .223 Remington in length; basically any round that can fed through a magazine any standard AR-15 lower. The second generation Rock Chucker can handle longer cartridges. Fortunately the longest caliber firearm I own is 5.45x39mm.

If I was going into reloading and wanted a strictly progressive press, I would either go with Dillon or a Hornady Lock-N-Load AP.

As for dies, if I am not mistaken, the are all interchangeable and use the same thread so they are interchangeable between die makers. I have yet to hear of a press that cannot handle multiple calibers. However, you may have an issue with some equipment handling longer rifle calibers such as .308 Winchester/7.62 NATO.

Reloading requires patience and diligence.
First congratulations magicman007 on making the leap! Many fun hours are in your future...:wink:

netentity I was like you years ago and only bought RCBS. After getting back into reloading I started buying Lee products. I've found that Lee has left RCBS behind on their Dies and are a lot cheaper in price. Their presses still don't compare to RCBS but the will get the job done and a lesser price.
 

LVLouisCyphre

Obama is a mack daddy!
First congratulations magicman007 on making the leap! Many fun hours are in your future...:wink:

netentity I was like you years ago and only bought RCBS. After getting back into reloading I started buying Lee products. I've found that Lee has left RCBS behind on their Dies and are a lot cheaper in price. Their presses still don't compare to RCBS but the will get the job done and a lesser price.
I chose the RCBS as I wanted something upgradeable to a progressive.

I have looked at Lee's website and they do have some good products and some innovations unique to their presses with case and bullet feeding.

I have only two issues with Lee Precision products.
  • Warranty; they warranty everything for two years, Dillion, Hornady and RCBS warranty everything for life.
    If you use a press, chances are you'll have a warranty issue during the few months of having it as they are well constructed. Your press will out live you and whomever it is willed to in your estate. Lee is no exception to that. However, I do feel they should complete with the de facto industry standard lifetime warranty.

  • Die caliber availability.
    Usually RCBS comes out dies in a new caliber first. RCBS has 5.45x39mm rifle dies which is the caliber of my S&W M&P15R. Dlllon, Hornady and Lee do not. While we don't have a source of brass cased 5.45x39mm or an inexpensive source of brass yet, I suspect that will happen within twelve months of SAAMI producing a standard for caliber and the ammo makers tooling for that caliber. I believe the same process occurred which brought about USA made 7.62x39mm ammunition and brass.
 

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