Nat'l Parks CCW


zwvirtual

New member
Whatever happened with this? There was a public response period that was supposed to be over in August, and then Bush was supposed to sign the bill (or whatever it is) to allow CCW in Nat'l Parks. With his term almost over, is he going to get it signed before he gets out? You know Obama won't sign it.
 

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NRA UR2

New member
Parks CCW

I've tried to follow it, too. The PS sent out surveys to people who use the parks and according to them it was unanimous that the majority of users did't want guns in their parks. The NRA spent alot of time and money trying to get the law changed but to no avail. A final decision hasn't been made as far as I know, but sure as hell doesn't look good at this point. And when obanna takes office we can look for a total demise of CCW through some sort of subterfuge(as yet to be announced.):wacko::unsure::confused::help:
 

Bohemian

New member
What happened is Harry "Gun Ban" Reid and Nancy "No Ammo" Pelosi asked the department of the interior to extend the response period... to give the "Gun Ban Obama" club time to take office and prevent it from happening...

It is currently in the hands and power of the department of the interior, they are the ones whom will make or break the deal; unless "Gun Ban, Tax & Spend Welfare State Obama" and company does something first...

NRA-ILA :: Update On Right-To-Carry In National Parks And Wildlife Refuges
 

ricbak

New member
National Parks Updated Released Today, 12/5/2k8

U.S. Department of the Interior Date: December 5, 2008
Contact: Chris Paolino
202-208-6416
Interior Announces Final Firearms Policy Update
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Lyle Laverty today announced that the Department of the Interior has finalized updated regulations governing the possession of firearms in national parks and wildlife refuges. The final rule, which updates existing regulations, would allow an individual to carry a concealed weapon in national parks and wildlife refuges if, and only if, the individual is authorized to carry a concealed weapon under state law in the state in which the national park or refuge is located. The update has been submitted to the Federal Register for publication and is available to the public on U.S. Department of the Interior Home Page.

Existing regulations regarding the carrying of firearms remain otherwise unchanged, particularly limitations on poaching and target practice and prohibitions on carrying firearms in federal buildings.

“America was founded on the idea that the federal and state governments work together to serve the public and preserve our natural resources,” Laverty said. “The Department’s final regulation respects this tradition by allowing individuals to carry concealed firearms in federal park units and refuges to the extent that they could lawfully do so under state law. This is the same basic approach adopted by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the United States Forest Service (USFS), both of which allow visitors to carry weapons consistent with applicable federal and state laws.”

On February 22, 2008, Interior Secretary Kempthorne responded to letters from 51 Senators, both Democrats and Republicans, as well as from the Chairman and Ranking Member of the House Natural Resources Committee, urging him to update existing regulations that prohibit the carrying of firearms in national parks and wildlife refuges. In his response, the Secretary directed Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Lyle Laverty “to develop and propose for public comment by April 30 Federal regulations that will update firearms policies on these lands to reflect existing Federal laws (such as those prohibiting weapons in Federal buildings) and the laws by which the host states govern transporting and carrying of firearms on their analogous public lands.”

Changes in the final regulations from those originally proposed in April were developed as the result of public comments. In particular, comments expressed concern about the feasibility of implementing regulations which directly linked the carrying of concealed firearms in national parks and wildlife refuges to the ability of an individual to carry a concealed firearm on analogous state lands. The final regulations remove that potential logistical hurdle.

The existing regulations, as currently in effect, were adopted in 1981 for national wildlife refuges and in 1983 for national parks. Since that time many states have enacted new firearms policies. Currently, 48 states have passed legislation allowing for the lawful possession of concealed weapons.

“The Department believes that in managing parks and refuges we should, as appropriate, make every effort to give the greatest respect to the democratic judgments of State legislatures with respect to concealed firearms,” said Laverty. “Federal agencies have a responsibility to recognize the expertise of the States in this area, and federal regulations should be developed and implemented in a manner that respects state prerogatives and authority.”
 

Bohemian

New member
U.S. Department of the Interior Date: December 5, 2008
Contact: Chris Paolino
202-208-6416
Interior Announces Final Firearms Policy Update
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Lyle Laverty today announced that the Department of the Interior has finalized updated regulations governing the possession of firearms in national parks and wildlife refuges. The final rule, which updates existing regulations, would allow an individual to carry a concealed weapon in national parks and wildlife refuges if, and only if, the individual is authorized to carry a concealed weapon under state law in the state in which the national park or refuge is located. The update has been submitted to the Federal Register for publication and is available to the public on U.S. Department of the Interior Home Page.

Existing regulations regarding the carrying of firearms remain otherwise unchanged, particularly limitations on poaching and target practice and prohibitions on carrying firearms in federal buildings.

“America was founded on the idea that the federal and state governments work together to serve the public and preserve our natural resources,” Laverty said. “The Department’s final regulation respects this tradition by allowing individuals to carry concealed firearms in federal park units and refuges to the extent that they could lawfully do so under state law. This is the same basic approach adopted by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the United States Forest Service (USFS), both of which allow visitors to carry weapons consistent with applicable federal and state laws.”

On February 22, 2008, Interior Secretary Kempthorne responded to letters from 51 Senators, both Democrats and Republicans, as well as from the Chairman and Ranking Member of the House Natural Resources Committee, urging him to update existing regulations that prohibit the carrying of firearms in national parks and wildlife refuges. In his response, the Secretary directed Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Lyle Laverty “to develop and propose for public comment by April 30 Federal regulations that will update firearms policies on these lands to reflect existing Federal laws (such as those prohibiting weapons in Federal buildings) and the laws by which the host states govern transporting and carrying of firearms on their analogous public lands.”

Changes in the final regulations from those originally proposed in April were developed as the result of public comments. In particular, comments expressed concern about the feasibility of implementing regulations which directly linked the carrying of concealed firearms in national parks and wildlife refuges to the ability of an individual to carry a concealed firearm on analogous state lands. The final regulations remove that potential logistical hurdle.

The existing regulations, as currently in effect, were adopted in 1981 for national wildlife refuges and in 1983 for national parks. Since that time many states have enacted new firearms policies. Currently, 48 states have passed legislation allowing for the lawful possession of concealed weapons.

“The Department believes that in managing parks and refuges we should, as appropriate, make every effort to give the greatest respect to the democratic judgments of State legislatures with respect to concealed firearms,” said Laverty. “Federal agencies have a responsibility to recognize the expertise of the States in this area, and federal regulations should be developed and implemented in a manner that respects state prerogatives and authority.”

Ordinarily, I would think this is good news, as it stands its probably moot, or will be once gun ban obama and company get started...

Obama: "...I am
consistently on record and will
continue to be on record as opposing
concealed carry."
Chicago Tribune, April 27, 2004

"My first priority will be to reinstate the assault weapons ban PERMANENTLY as soon as I take office. Within 90 days, we will go back after kitchen table dealers, and work to end the gun show and internet sales loopholes. In the first year, I intend to work with Congress on a national no carry law, 1 gun a month purchase limits, and bans on all semi-automatic guns."
Barack Obama, VPC Fund Raiser, 2007

Regarding the AWB...
The NRA has prevented that legislation from getting through congress for the last 8 years, as President, I intend to make it happen...
Barack Obama, Democratic Primary Debate, 2007

“I think it’s a scandal that (W. Bush) did not authorize a renewal of the assault weapons ban.” (Illinois Senate Debate No. 3: Barack Obama vs. Alan Keyes, Oct. 21, 2004)
 

Red Hat

New member
I knew that it was suposed to be finalized this month. My question is after reading the rule, if a person does not have a permit do they have to secure their firearm and ammo like before or do they comply with their states law on vehicle carry? I guess like any ruling there are a few bugs that they have to work out.
 

gdcleanfun

Banned
Currently, 48 states have passed legislation allowing for the lawful possession of concealed weapons.

Now, if we could just get N. Marianas, and Am. Samoa, and Wisconsin and Illinois on board. I don't think that's asking too much, do you?:haha:
 

gvaldeg1

NRA Member
I knew that it was suposed to be finalized this month. My question is after reading the rule, if a person does not have a permit do they have to secure their firearm and ammo like before or do they comply with their states law on vehicle carry? I guess like any ruling there are a few bugs that they have to work out.

The answer is: if you don't have a CCW permit; then the previous laws and rules apply. I still see this as a victory even if only a limited one. The message is clear...if you don't have a CCW permit...get one. At this point in time, I'm happy to see even small successes for pro-gunners!
 

10-343B

New member
The amendment to 36 CFR 2.4 takes effect Jan 9, 2009. 30 days after being published in the federal register. You can view the changes at Electronic Code of Federal Regulations:.
Or search U.S. Government Printing Office Home Page for 36 CFR 2.4.

And as with most states laws you must not only have your CCW Permit with you but you must have valid ID with you as well. As the law was interpreted you must have your firearm concealed at all times, regardless if your state allows open carry. And forget about other weapons, this regulation address only firearms- swords are still illegal in National Parks.
 

ecocks

New member
And we are thinking that the revised regulations will still prohibit carry in the buildings of a park under the "no carry in Federal buildings" rules wich covers several hotels, visitor centers and even toilets?
 

CA CCWInstructor

New member
Brady Campaign Sues Interior Department Over Rule Allowing Concealed Guns in Parks, Will Seek Court Injunction

WASHINGTON, Dec. 30 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Brady Campaign to
Prevent Gun Violence today filed suit in federal court asking that
the court strike down a last-minute Bush Administration rule change
allowing concealed, loaded firearms in national parks and wildlife refuges.

The suit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of
Columbia, and seeks an injunction to block the rule, which is
scheduled to go into effect on January 9, 2009.

"The Bush Administration's last-minute gift to the gun lobby,
allowing concealed semiautomatic weapons in national parks,
jeopardizes the safety of park visitors in violation of federal law,"
said Brady Campaign President Paul Helmke. "We should not be making
it easier for dangerous people to carry concealed firearms in our parks."

Attorneys with the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence's Legal
Action Project and the law firm Ropes & Gray in Washington, D.C. are
representing the Brady Campaign in this case. To read the complaint,
go to http://www.bradycenter.org/xshare/pd...-complaint.pdf.

The rule will allow guns in rural and urban national park areas
around the country, from Wyoming's Yellowstone and California's
Yosemite to Philadelphia's Independence National Historical Park,
home of the Liberty Bell. The suit was filed on behalf of the Brady
Campaign and its members, including school teachers in the New York
and Washington, D.C. areas who are canceling or curtailing school
trips to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty and the National Mall
in Washington, D.C. now that the Bush Administration will be allowing
guns in these national park areas.

The suit charges that the Interior Department violated several
federal laws in its rush to implement the rule before President Bush
leaves office, including failing to conduct any environmental review
of the harm that the rule will cause, as is required by the National
Environmental Policy Act. The Department also violated a White House
directive that no rules should be issued after November 1, 2008,
except in "extraordinary circumstances," issuing the last-minute rule
change on December 10, 2008. The rule also violates the National Park
Service Organic Act and the National Wildlife Refuge System
Administration Act, which created the parks and wildlife refuges as
protected lands for safe enjoyment of all visitors.

Rules in place since the Reagan Administration have allowed visitors
to transport guns in national parks and wildlife refuges if they are
unloaded and stored or dismantled. These restrictions have helped
make these areas some of the safest places to visit in the country.
Yet at the behest of the gun lobby, the Interior Department announced
earlier this year that it planned to allow concealed firearms in
national parks and wildlife refuges. Concealed carrying will be
allowed in every state that allows concealed carrying, even if the
state specifically bans the practice in state parks. Only Illinois
and Wisconsin prohibit concealed carrying.

Numerous studies have confirmed that concealed carrying of firearms
does not reduce crime and, if anything, leads to increased violent
crime. Experience in states that have allowed concealed carrying of
firearms has shown that thousands of dangerous people are able to get
licenses. In Florida, for example, more than 4,200 licenses were
revoked because many of these licensees committed a crime. Since
becoming the first state to allow the concealed carrying of firearms
in 1987, Florida consistently has had one of the highest rates of
violent crime in the nation. Florida has been ranked as the state
with the highest annual violent crime rate more often than any other
state in the last two decades.

As the nation's largest, non-partisan, grassroots organization
leading the fight to prevent gun violence, the Brady Campaign, with
its dedicated network of Million Mom March Chapters, works to enact
and enforce sensible gun laws, regulations and public policies. The
Brady Campaign is devoted to creating an America free from gun
violence, where all Americans are safe at home, at school, at work,
and in our communities.

For continuing insight and comment on the gun issue, read Paul
Helmke's blog at Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence. Visit the Brady
Campaign website at Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence.

Contact: Peter Hamm, 202-898-0792, phamm@bradymail.org
 

SweetPain

New member
Not sure if this is the right thread to post this but I came across the discussions about carrying on federal land/buildings.

Are historic land/buildings considered "federal" land/buildings if they are part of the National Trust?

There is an historic mansion/estate in the city where I live in Iowa. There are many events there every year and I of course would like to carry if legal when I am there. However, I am unsure if it is possible since it is part the the National Trust.

I wasn't able to find any info about being considered federal land/building on the www.preservationnation.org website.

Thanks to anyone who can help or shed some light on the matter.
 

sailor

New member
Federal

I presume you are in Iowa. The Federal part of your question should be easy to resolve by contacting some Federal entity in your local area and asking. They may not have an answer, but I find that you can usually get a referral to someone that has the answers. Sorry, I don't know, but asking is a good thing - most people try to help out. A Park Service office, maybe your Sheriff office, things like that. Good idea to pin down that info!
sailor
 

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