Venison Cookbooks & Recipes


lukem

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PascalFleischman

New member
I just go by word of mouth. I haven't used a cookbook yet. I did, however, use an Alton Brown recipe where he roasted a beef rib roast & made a wine reduction thyme sauce. I cooked a bacon-wrapped backstrap the same way, and it turned out pretty good.

For the most part, a saltwater bath followed by a buttermilk soak (1 day each) has helped me a lot. I'm still learning, though. Let us know how it turns out.

Just remember, when browning venison, you have to add a little oil or fat to brown it, as the meat is so lean. It'll burn in a dry pan.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
I just go by word of mouth. I haven't used a cookbook yet. I did, however, use an Alton Brown recipe where he roasted a beef rib roast & made a wine reduction thyme sauce. I cooked a bacon-wrapped backstrap the same way, and it turned out pretty good.

For the most part, a saltwater bath followed by a buttermilk soak (1 day each) has helped me a lot. I'm still learning, though. Let us know how it turns out.

Just remember, when browning venison, you have to add a little oil or fat to brown it, as the meat is so lean. It'll burn in a dry pan.

Thanks. bacon-wrapped backstrap sounds pretty good!
 

gdcleanfun

Banned
Hubby says that he used to hang his backstrap out to dry on a home made rack. He seasoned it and made jerky. I can't wait to move and then I'll be waiting impatiently for hunting season. We did okay with his new Remington 30-06 a few weeks ago at the range. I has a Leopold 3X9X50 scope (it's awesome!). I gave the set up to him last year for X-mas, we're just now getting to shoot it, we had little money for range time, and the free range at the other end of town is scary what with people shooting across the road! In any case, it will be fun to see what we can do with it in the field when move up north. I guess that maybe a good hunting/skinning knife is in order for him for next Christmas? Hush now, everyone!!!
 
I usually soak the meat in brine, changing the water several times a day to keep the water "clear". This goes on for two days, then switch to a baking soda & water mix. I let the meat soak for several hours to overnight, then soak the meat in plain water to draw out the excess baking soda. The baking soda tenderizes the meat.

My recipes are pretty basic. Depending on the crowd I'm serving, I'll prepare the meat in a variety of ways ranging from stir fry to jerky. BBQ deer ribs are usually a pretty big hit.



gf
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
Cool. My meat is being dropped off at a processor tonight to get steaks, groudn meat and sausage made out of it. I can't wait!
 
Lucky you guys got processors that work with game meat in your area. Here in PRHI, we have to pretty much do everything ourselves. :sad: The bright side is that it forces us to learn valuable skills.



gf
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
Well Sunday I pretty much watch videos of people cleaning and preparing the deer meat. I think I'd be able to field dress and quarter it myself next time or at least give it a try.
 

lukem

Administrator
Staff member
Hubby says that he used to hang his backstrap out to dry on a home made rack. He seasoned it and made jerky. I can't wait to move and then I'll be waiting impatiently for hunting season. We did okay with his new Remington 30-06 a few weeks ago at the range. I has a Leopold 3X9X50 scope (it's awesome!). I gave the set up to him last year for X-mas, we're just now getting to shoot it, we had little money for range time, and the free range at the other end of town is scary what with people shooting across the road! In any case, it will be fun to see what we can do with it in the field when move up north. I guess that maybe a good hunting/skinning knife is in order for him for next Christmas? Hush now, everyone!!!

I'm borrowing my friend's dehydrator to try and make some jerky out of some of the meat. The Blaser rifle I'm planning on using/buying from my friend is a 30-06 too.
 

skipjack_1st

New member
I think a lot of people 'miss the boat', when not processing their own game. My daughter and I butchered 5 deer this year for our freezer. Not only is it good father daughter time, but you know EXACTLY what you got.

It does take a little capital investment to get good equipment, (my next purchase is a real sausage stuffer). I for one enjoy the process and am able to bone everythng, with very little waste. One of the fav's of the family this year has been the liver. I've always saved and eaten the heart but both the women in my life prefer the liver.

Even though I'm recuperating from surgery right now, it sure was nice to pull a package of venison brats from the freezer for dinner last night:)

Take the time to learn from someone abd then decide how you want it. I actually learned from an ex butcher but have since decided that I will butcher to my liking.
 
lukem

Brown a few deer steaks in a skillet with a little butter, chopped onions and green peppers.

Lower heat and add two cans of cream of mushroom soup, cover and simmer on low for a couple hours.

Serve over mashed potatoes.

Can't beat it.

We made roasters full for our Annual Game Feast at the Toronto Rod and Gun Club.
 

PascalFleischman

New member
Heres' one I tried last weekend when my folks came over.....AWESOME tasting backstraps.....

1) Peppercorn crusted
In 1/4 cup of extra virgin olive oil, steep 1/4 cup of crushed black peppercorns for about 10 minutes...until fragrant. Turn off heat & cool to room temperature. Stir in 1 TBSP of Kosher salt.

Liberally coat loin in peppercorn paste, pressing it into the meat so that it sticks. Let sit for about 1 hour.

2) Herb & Garlic stuffed

Cut about a 3/4" deep slit along the length of the loin, stopping about 1" short from each end to create a "pocket" in which to stuff the herbs. Cut 4-6 medium sized garlic cloves, about 10 fresh sprigs of thyme, and 6-8 1" pieces of fresh rosemary twigs (stripped of the needles).

Evenly space and stuff into the cavity the thyme & garlic hunks. Pour in some olive oil & sprinkle cavity w/ Kosher salt. Using the 1" rosemary twigs, evenly space the skewers to shut the cavity so that the loin essentially looks "whole" again.


Heat 2 TBSP of extra virgin olive oil in a skillet over med-high heat until it lightly begins to smoke. Brown on all 4 sides (without moving around) about 2 minutes, each...per loin section. Insert meat thermometer at the largest section of the pepper crusted loin, along the middle of the loin.

Lay out 4-6 slices of bacon on a broiler rack. Lay the (browned)Herb Stuffed loin over the bacon, & drape the slices over top.

Place both sections on a broiler rack and roast in a 450 degree oven until the meat registers 120-130 degrees inside (for med-rare). Let meat rest for 5 minutes, then slice into 3/4" thick medallions.


I also made a red wine/mushroom sauce to serve with it. In a separate skillet, sautee some baby sliced portabello mushrooms in 1/2 TBSP of olive oil.

Rinse lightly the browning skillet to get the blackened peppercorn bits out of it, without scraping all the browned meat bits. Deglaze the browned bits of meat off the bottom with about 4 cups of good red wine. Toss in 3 crushed garlic cloves to simmer. Bring to a low boil, & reduce heat to med-low. Whisk in a separate cup, 1C of water and 1/2 tbsp of corn starch. Whisk starch mixture into the simmering wine with 1 stick of butter & stir occasionally. When the sauce thickens, a bit, salt to taste & stir in mushrooms. Let sauce thicken, then serve over venison medallions.
 

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