Top Nav

Running With Your Gun

Running With Your Gun

Running With Your Gun

When I was with the Agency I was probably in the best shape of my life. However, these days I still run over 2 miles every morning, but that’s about it. I don’t lift weights or do any other exercises.

The truth is, I don’t even like running. I know some folks who are all into running and sign up for marathons and the whole nine yards, but not me. I only run because I feel like it gives me energy for the rest of my day and helps me be more productive.

Of course, when it comes to running one of the most common questions I get asked is what do I do with my gun? Well, for running, I believe there are two really good options. The first option is the fanny pack. My wife likes the fanny pack, however I do not use this option and don’t plan to anytime soon. But if that’s the only way you can carry a gun when you’re exercising, by all means do it.

The Belly Band…

When I’m running my 2 miles every morning I use a Belly Band. If you’re not familiar with the Belly Band it’s basically a long elastic band that you put around your waist. It has a space for your gun and a space for your magazine.

The Belly Band goes underneath your shirt, so you need to make sure to wear a loose fitting shirt so the gun won’t print through. In other words, the super tight spandex shirts won’t cut it if you’re wearing a Belly Band.

Also, when it comes to the location of where to actually wear the band I’ve seen people wear it a million different ways and it’s all up to you. Some folks wear the band around their hips right at the waistline and prefer to carry the gun in the “appendix” position.

I don’t like to do this…

Because I don’t think it’s a good idea to have the gun pointing at my body and legs. Other people like to carry the gun at their waistline in the 3 o’ clock traditional position. This is more where I prefer to carry it.

One of the most important factors you need to consider when choosing a position is how easily can you access the gun? If I were you, I would put on the Belly Band and with a safe and empty weapon, practice your draw a few times. If you’re having trouble getting the gun out, you need to try something different.

Also, if you choose to use the Belly Band, you don’t want to let the world know you’re carrying a gun. I’ve known people who like to touch the gun every two seconds just to make sure it’s there. This is a dead giveaway you’re carrying a gun, so resist the temptation. (Resist this temptation no matter where you’re carrying the gun.)

Lastly, I’ve attached a picture to show you what the Belly Band looks like with the Ruger LCP that I run with. I’ve put the band on over my shirt and a little higher on my body just to make things easier.

Stay safe while exercising.

Print Friendly

,

  • Cobrawing

    I got a belly band a long time ago that I think was made by Bianchi. I haven’t worn it in a long time and your article just reminded me to pull it out and start using it again for certain situations. I don’t find it comfortable against raw skin so for me it requires the use of two shirts. I wear it over a t-shirt and then put a shirt or a larger t-shirt over the weapon and belly band. It’s definitely an alternative from the traditional modes of carry and I thank you for reminded us of these kind of rigs. They’re not for everyone but certainly an alternative for some in the right situations.

    • Bill

      That is the exact reason to wear an under armour type shirt underneath. There are also waistline sweat runner tubes that can be converted into holsters also.

  • xUSMC

    I wonder how well it would work for someone with a belly and a Sig P220r-Carry.

    • AKgunguy

      I’m not familiar with the Sig 220 but I use belly band with 4″ 1911 while biking and it is perfect.

  • AKgunguy

    I don’t run much, due to bad knees (plumber/Marine Vet) but I ride bicycle a lot. I find the Belly Band the way to go in this situation as well. Thanks for the great article!

    • tionico

      I’m an avid road cyclist (multiple thousands of miles a year) and bought the Ruger LCP because it fits perfectly in the fight rear jersey pocket.. I turn it ‘upside down” in the pistol “rug” that comes with, leave the zipper almost all the way open, and slip it into that pocket with the muzzle pointed outboard and downward, open zipper facing upward toward the opening of the pocket. I can very easily and quicklyh reach round with my right hand, slip it innto the top of the pocket, and have the handgun drawn and ready to bear very quickly. I don’t even have to turn it, jusst draw it out of the top of the rug inside the pocket. It all but disappears in there, and looks like a standard tool roll a lot of cyclists carry everywhere. I’ve never had anyone get a HINT I am carrying, even when riding witih others for extended periods of time. After a year of that, though, I found that the corrosion on the pistol is extreme…. it is no longer blue, but brown with rust. that “rug” is not moisture proof, and the salts from my sweat are brutal.

      This past winter I found a very lightly used Kahr 380, stainless slide. It is just a touch smaller than the LCP, may be a tad heavier but so what. I use the Ruger “rug” just as I did with the LCP. Corosion problem gone.

      • AKgunguy

        I may try that carry set up with this little Taurus Titanium Frame .38 I have. Thanks for sharing the method. I just bought a Kona Hei Hei 29 er this year and
        love it. what is your preferred ride?

  • 230therapy

    Is running with a gun so difficult that it requires an article? I carry various guns in the appendix position under a loose t-shirt. Stop overthinking and trying to buy a solution.

  • http://www.facebook.com/blogen.geezer Blogen Geezer

    Many years ago I fired a ’38 ‘belly gun’ owned by a retired officer/detective who had carried it in similar fashion for over 20 years in the humid Midwest, as one of his backups. In spite of periodic cleaning, the weapon was pitted on one side from the body moisture.

  • Ben Arnold

    Living in South Florida, I seldom wear the type of clothing in which a weapon can be concealed. For that reason, I bought a Beretta 950 BS, .25 caliber and easily concealed in any pants pocket. However, to protect my pocket as well as hide its outline, I made a leather pocket holster with a built-in “hook” which snags the pocket – and stays there – when one draws the gun. The shape of the holster also holds the gun in an upright position, with the handle up, at all times. If one is running ‘informal,” simply wearing shorts with pockets, this would be one solution. It’s highly unlikely to jump out of one’s pocket and the holster hides the outline, even with tight shorts. I made my own, but there are many styles of pocket holsters and not only for small caliber guns, either. It’s just that I enjoy leatherworking and I saw a style of pocket holster I liked by Googling them and made my own in a short time. There are a few other styles I like which I may make at another time. (To counter the fact that I often carry this small caliber automatic, I use what are known as “safety” bullets, which are basically miniature shotgun shells, with tiny pellets that will spread once entering a body , but will not punch through to hit an innocent bystander.)

  • TheDoaner

    Running with my gun is the easy part. The hassle is running with my tri-fold wallet that has my permit filed in there along with everything else.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1007943504 David Case

      A good fanny pack would take care of the handgun and the wallet.

      • Columbo

        I have been using a fanny pack over 25 years. I also keep a speed loader in one of the pockets. It is either on me or in a fanny pack.

  • http://www.facebook.com/pj.lafaille Pj LaFaille

    As a personal trainer & gym owner with over thirty years experience I would recommend that at over 30 years of age it is time to switch to a bike. Your joints will really appreciate it. And unless you are training to compete in some sort of running event it is time to invest in a decent bike. Also a bike offers many options to carry concealed.

  • John

    What brand is this in the picture?

  • DK

    What brand of belly band do you use?

  • D

    What brand is shown in the picture?