Caching the Snubby Revolver

Caching the Snubby Revolver

Caching the Snubby Revolver

I recently finished reading the book, Amarillo Slim in a World Full of Fat People. It’s not a gun book, but a very entertaining read about the life of a gambler. In the book, he mentions that throughout his gambling days he always carried a .38 Special snub-nosed revolver in his pocket. I imagine there are still plenty of gamblers you can find in seedy bars who have this gun in their pocket today.

But then again, so do a lot of Americans, myself included. The particular snubby I have is a Smith & Wesson model 642 Centennial Airweight. The fact is, the .38 Special snubby revolver has been around since the late 1800’s and is still one of the most popular firearms in the world.

This particular gun happens to be on my mind…

Because it’s one of many I have stored throughout my house (in a quick opening safe.) And just the other day when I was near the safe containing this gun, I heard a knock at my back door. Now, nobody ever comes to my backdoor, let alone my front door, because most people don’t know where I live.

So when I heard the knock, I quickly opened the gun safe and slid the snubby revolver into my pants pocket. I then stared out one of the windows and didn’t see a criminal or anything requiring my gun, but simply my neighbor. She was having trouble getting into her house and needed my help.

Besides the ability to easily carry it around in a pants pocket, another reason I love the snubby revolver is because it’s an easy gun to cache. It can fit in the smallest of containers and can quickly be buried in a place you find appropriate.

Plus, the snubby revolver is a (relatively) cheap gun that you can get for around $300-$350 so I don’t mind caching one and having it get a little beat up or weathered. (Even though I recommend mylar bags for caching guns and ammo.)

What’s more…

There are plenty of used snubbies that you can get for even better prices if you look around. Also, speaking of caches and snubbies, here’s a little food for thought: With all that’s going on with guns and politics just imagine if the government came and tried to take your guns right now. (I know many people believe it’s very far fetched, but just humor me.)

If the government knocked on your door this afternoon, are all of your guns in your house… are all of your eggs in one basket? Again, just food for thought, but maybe you should consider getting a snubby revolver and caching it in a safe place.

With that being said, if I were going to add to my snubby revolver collection today (donations are always welcome), I would stick with Smith & Wesson and Ruger as in my eyes they make the best. And as far as ammunition, the ammo that I’m using right now is Winchester’s PDX1 (130 grain, jacketed hollow point.)

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  • WOP 2

    I like the J-frame Smith, and own a 638 and a 642. The first thing I did was to take those awful rubber “ribber” grips off, and replace them with smooth pearlite micarta grips from Ajax. Unlike the ribber grips, they don’t snag, hang, or beat your hands up at the range. Lightweight pocket S&W’s are utilitarian, but they sure as hell are not much fun to shoot. Lots of recoil, muzzle flash, muzzle blast. Of course, in a stress fire shooting you’ll not feel the recoil, and may not even hear the gun going off. Been there, and its a really strange phenomenon. By the way, Ajax and others make the smooth grips. Some are even available in wood for the purists out there. Those grips make all the difference in the world.

  • They say Nyclad is good ammo for the snubby too…So, given the same models come in .38 +p or .357, wouldn’t it be better to get the .357 as you have more flexibility with ammo? Then there is the Charter Arms Bulldog. I wish Smith or Ruger would come out with a lightweight 5 shot 44 special or 45 long colt snubbie. Call it the LCR+ or LCBR. If Charter arms can do it at 23 oz, it Ruger could do a little better.

  • blogengeezer

    IF a ‘neophyte’ gun owner, please practice and know the weapon’s (including your own) limitations (this applies to All weaponry of course). The ‘snubby’ barrel length does not fully take advantage of the gas expansion, therefor ‘close quarters’ is the maximum efficiency. Barrel length also is an accuracy advantage, lost in a short barrel. Having many LEO associates, we practiced with their various weaponry (‘backups’ included) and various loads on junker cars years ago (they were dumped randomly back then), I found out that the slugs from the short barrels will not penetrate most doors or glass with any energy to spare, if at all. Newer lighter metals would offer less resistance. Distance is a major factor. Heavy winter clothing, covering an assailant, could prevent stopping force from being applied, unless right up close and personal. Of course, as you and ‘Nuttin’ Fancy’ (YT vids) have mentioned, anything is better than nothing. Good post, good personal weapon. thank you Jason, for giving credit where credit is due.

    • Faster burning powers can make the short barrel problem not so significant.

  • My main carry gun is the Ruger SP101 2″ 357 mag snubby.
    I dont carry full magnums in it because the wife wont be able to handle the gun, but used a toned back load that is somewhere around a 38+p+
    Wouldnt trade it for any other gun on the market.

  • TUGBOAT

    My Charter Arms Undercover is no slouch and a very undervalued snubbie IMHO

  • JSDinTexas

    I focused on an overrated LCP until I fondled the S&W 638 – SOLD!
    While many opt for a high capacity cannon (and I carry a G30 especially in the winter w/ the 638 as a BUG) the most likely scenario on the street is the single BG in the parking lot.
    I use Speer GD short-barrel JHP and a grip laser so we don’t have to use the short radius sights, and carry 5 more in a speed strip for a total of 10 rounds available.
    This pocket gun weighs 1 lb loaded, is comfortable, and quickly accessible. The ballistics of the 38+P resembles the 9mm, and sure beats the sometimes ineffective .380.

    I highly recommend checking one out.

  • Ex-paratrooper

    I carry the exact same gun in my pocket whenever I leave the house. I like the light weight and the protected hammer. I load it with +P’s. However, I do keep a Judge Magnum in my bedside table loaded with .410 Personal Protection. I don’t want to shoot thru my walls and my neighbors walls.

  • Marry Root

    upto I saw the check which had said $5010, I didn’t believe that my father in law had been truly taking home money part time on their apple laptop.. there dads buddy has done this 4 only twenty two months and a short time ago repayed the loans on there house and got a gorgeous Renault 4. go to, jump15.comCHECK IT OUT

  • dean800

    uptil I saw the draft 4 $7128, I have faith that…my… friends brother actualy taking home money in there spare time from there labtop.. there friend brother has done this for only about 10 months and recently took care of the loans on there house and bought a great new Smart ForTwo. this is where I went, jump15.comCHECK IT
    OUT

  • Marlene Wilkes

    just before I looked at the paycheck that said $7403, I didnt believe …that…my friends brother woz like trully making money part-time at there labtop.. there aunt had bean doing this for only fourteen months and as of now repayed the dept on there appartment and bourt a new Land Rover Range Rover. we looked here, jump15.comCHECK IT OUT

  • Capt-Z

    I don’t care for the S & W’s (the 642 is sure pretty though), I have a Taurus Model 85 Ultra-lite that I carry instead.

  • Olga Peluso

    until I saw the bank draft for $5782, I did not believe …that…my friends brother could truley bringing home money part time from there labtop.. there great aunt started doing this 4 only about 16 months and resantly repayed the loans on their house and bought a great new Honda NSX. go to, jump15.comCHECK IT OUT

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