Nevada Concealed Carry Permit Information

Nevada Concealed Carry Quick Stats

Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit

Nevada Concealed Carry Permit Front (Las Vegas)
Nevada Concealed Carry Permit Front (Las Vegas)

Nevada Concealed Carry FAQ’s

Does Nevada issue concealed carry permits?

In 1995, Nevada became a Shall Issue State and currently issues Concealed Firearm Permits to residents of Nevada and non-residents.

“Within 120 days after a complete application for a permit is submitted, the sheriff to whom the application is submitted shall grant or deny the application.

Who issues Nevada Concealed Firearm Permits?

Nevada Concealed Firearm Permits are issued by County Sheriffs.

Residents of Nevada must apply to the sheriff of the county they reside in. Non-Residents may apply to any sheriff.

Are background checks required for a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit?

Yes, the Sheriff will conduct an investigation to determine if the applicant is eligible for a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit. This investigation includes sending the applicant’s fingerprints to the Central Repository for Nevada Records of Criminal History for submission to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for its report concerning the criminal history of the applicant. The investigation also must include a report from the National Instant Criminal Background Check System.

Does having a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit exempt you from the background check when purchasing a firearm in Nevada?

Yes. Having a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permits issued on or after July 1, 2011 does exempt you from a National Instant Criminal System (NICS) check when purchasing a firearm according to the ATF Permanent Brady Permit Chart.

How long is a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit valid for?

Nevada Concealed Firearm Permits expire 5 years from the date they are issued unless renewed or revoked.

What is the processing time for a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit?

The processing time for a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit is within 120 days from submitting your application to the Sheriff’s office.

Within 120 days after a complete application for a permit is submitted, the sheriff to whom the application is submitted shall grant or deny the application. If the application is denied, the sheriff shall send the applicant written notification setting forth the reasons for the denial.

How much does a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit cost?

Nevada County Sheriffs may not charge more than $60 when applying for a new Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit which DOES NOT include FBI fees which are usually $36.25.

For example, Las Vegas Charges $96.25 for new applications and $61.25 for renewal applications. Other Sheriffs should have roughly the same fees.

What are the requirements for obtaining a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit?

To qualify for a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit, Applicants must:

  1. Be 21 years old or older.
    1. Active members of the Armed Forces of the United States, the reserve or National Guard, or members who were honorably discharged or released may apply between the ages of 18 and 20.
  2. Is not prohibited from possessing a firearm pursuant to NRS 202.360.
  3. Demonstrates competence with handguns by presenting a certificate or other documentation to the sheriff which shows that the applicant:
    1. Successfully completed a course in firearm safety approved by a sheriff in this State; or
    2. Successfully completed a course in firearm safety offered by a federal, state or local law enforcement agency, community college, university or national organization that certifies instructors in firearm safety.[/toggle]

What are the training requirements for obtaining a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit?

To qualify for a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit you must demonstrate competence with a handgun by completing a course approved by the sheriff you are applying to and presenting the certificate or other documentation obtained when successfully completing the course. Courses must be taken within Nevada (and again, approved by the sheriff). No out-of-state permits/licenses, training or military training is accepted as approved training.

Does military training exempt you from the training requirements to get a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit?

Military training does not exempt you from the training requirements when applying for a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit.

What will cause you to be denied when applying for a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit?

Your application for a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit will be denied if:

  1. You are under 21 years of age.
  2. You do not provide the required documentation to demonstrate competence with a firearm.
  3. You are a fugitive from justice.
  4. You have been judicially declared mentally incompetent or insane.
  5. You have been admitted to a mental health facility, within the last 5 years.
  6. You have habitually used intoxicating liquor or a controlled substance to the extent that your normal faculties are impaired, including DUI convictions within five previous years and Medical Marijuana Patients.
  7. You have been convicted of a crime involving the use, or threatened use of force or violence, including misdemeanor convictions, within the last three (3) years.
  8. You have been convicted of a felony.
  9. You have been convicted of a crime involving domestic violence or stalking, or you are currently subject to a restraining order or other order of protection against violence.
  10. You are currently on parole or probation.
  11. You have been, within the preceding five (5) years, subject to any requirements imposed by a court as a condition to: a. Withholding the entry of judgment for your conviction of a felony, or b. Suspension of your sentence for the conviction of a felony, or c. Indictment by a Grand Jury.
  12. You have made a false statement on any application.
  13. You were dishonorably discharged from the Armed Forces.
  14. You are not lawfully admitted into or are no longer lawfully within the United States.
  15. You are prohibited from possessing a firearm under state and federal law, city and/or county ordinances.

Where can I find a firearm instructor for the required training to get a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit?

Each sheriff has an approved instructor list which can be found below.

How do I apply for a Non-Resident Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit?

Non-Residents can apply to any county sheriff in Nevada but must have completed the training requirements within that county.

How do I renew my Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit and what is the cost?

To renew your Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit, you must take an approved class to demonstrate continued competence with a handgun (see firearm training requirements above for approved instructors). You will also need to submit a renewal application and the fee which is usually around $61.25. You will go through another background check just like all new applicants go through.

How do you change a name on a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit?

We recommend contacting the sheriff that issued your Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit but the procedure should be similar to Las Vegas Metro Police Department’s procedure for name changes. You must go to the sheriff’s office and provide proof of your name change (marriage certificate, court document, etc.) They will take a new photo and obtain your signature with your new name. The fee is $25.

How do you change an address on a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit?

You must notify the sheriff who issued your Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit in writing within 30 days if your address has changed and include a fee of $15. If you fail to notify the sheriff of this change within 30 days you are subject to a civil penalty of $25.

What do you do if your Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit is lost, stolen, or damaged?

We recommend contacting the sheriff that issued your Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit but the procedure should be similar to Las Vegas Metro Police Department’s procedure for name changes. You must notify the sheriff who issued your Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit in writing and signed under oath within 30 days if your permit has been lost, stolen or damaged and include a fee of $15. You can either go to the sheriff and fill out an affidavit or mail a signed, notarized affidavit along with the $15 fee. If you fail to notify the sheriff of this change within 30 days you are subject to a civil penalty of $25.

If you find your permit after being issued a duplicate permit then you should notify the sheriff in writing and return the duplicate permit within 10 days. If you fail to notify the sheriff and return your permit within 10 days you are subject to a civil penalty of $25.

Do you have to notify the Sheriff that issued your Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit if you get arrested or convicted of a crime?

We cannot find anything in the law that states that you must notify the sheriff that issued your Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit if you get arrested or convicted of a crime.

If you move my permanent residence to another state, is your Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit still valid?

Since Nevada issues Concealed Firearm Permits to Non-residents then your permit “should” still be valid as long as you follow the procedure for changing your address (see above). To be sure, contact the sheriff that issued your Nevada Concealed Firearms Permit.

Can you transfer another state’s Concealed Carry Permit or License to Nevada?

No. You cannot transfer a permit or license from another state to Nevada. You must apply for a new Nevada Concealed Firearms Permit.

Does Nevada recognize or accept any other state’s concealed carry permits or licenses?

Yes, Nevada recognizes certain states which allows holders of valid permits/licenses to carry concealed in Nevada. While carrying concealed in Nevada you must have your permit/license in your possession and abide by all restrictions that apply to Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit holders. To view which state’s Nevada honors visit the USA Carry Concealed Carry Reciprocity Maps.

In Nevada, do you need to inform Law Enforcement that you are carrying a concealed weapon?

No, you do not need to inform Law Enforcement that you are carrying a concealed weapon or that you have a Concealed Firearm Permit. But you must have your permit on your person with proper identification when you are carrying a concealed firearm.

Each permittee shall carry the permit, or a duplicate issued pursuant to the provisions of NRS 202.367, together with proper identification whenever the permittee is in actual possession of a concealed firearm. Both the permit and proper identification must be presented if requested by a peace officer.[/toggle]

[toggle hide=”yes” border=”yes” style=”white” title_open=”Does Nevada issue Concealed Firearm Permits to resident aliens with a green card?” title_closed=”Does Nevada issue Concealed Firearm Permits to resident aliens with a green card?”]Yes, Nevada issued Concealed Firearm Permits to resident aliens with a green card. The following information is listed on the application used by Las Vegas Metro Police Department.

Legal Aliens (Immigrant, Legal Permanent Resident, and Non-Immigrant)- Proof of lawful alien status must be provided and must be possessed to prove lawful possession of firearms. You must also provide proof of your current residence.

Immigrant Alien & Legal Permanent Resident- A copy of your Alien card, which must not be expired and include an AR#, USCIS#, or A#

Non-Immigrant Alien- A copy of your Visa or Employment Authorization card (if required by DHS), valid Passport, I-94, AR# or A# (You also may require a valid hunting license, based upon visa type)

All parties, for this section, must meet the requirements listed in 18 U.S.C. 922 (d)(5), (g)(5) and (y)(2); 27 CFR 478.11 and 478.32(a)(5), in order to lawfully possess firearms in the U.S.[/toggle]

[toggle hide=”yes” border=”yes” style=”white” title_open=”What are the laws for carrying a firearm in an automobile in Nevada?” title_closed=”What are the laws for carrying a firearm in an automobile in Nevada?”]If you do not have a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit or a recognized out-of-state license/permit, you may not carry a concealed loaded handgun on your person but they may be openly carried or stored in a glove compartment or console box. All shotguns and rifles must be unloaded.

A rifle or shotgun is loaded, for the purposes of this section, when there is an unexpended cartridge or shell in the firing chamber, but not when the only cartridges or shells are in the magazine.

What places are off-limits when carrying a concealed weapon in Nevada?

The following places are off limits while carrying concealed in Nevada:

  • Any facility of a law enforcement agency.
  • A prison, city or county jail, or detention facility.
  • A courthouse or courtroom.
  • A public airport and/or a public building that is located on the property of a public airport.
  • A public building that has a metal detector at each public entrance.
  • A public building that has a sign posted at each public entrance indicating that no firearms are allowed in the building.
  • Any facility of a public or private school without written permission.
  • Any facility of a vocational/technical school, or the University of Nevada, or Community College System without written permission.
  • Any other building owned or occupied by the Federal Government, the state, or local government.
  • Any other place where carrying a concealed firearm is prohibited by state or federal law.

For more details on prohibited places read NSR 202.3673.

What are the laws involving alcohol and carrying a concealed weapon in Nevada?

You may open carry or carry a concealed weapon if you have a Nevada Concealed Firearm Permit or recognized out-of-state permit/license in restaurants that serve liquor and in bar as well as consume alcohol as long as your blood alcohol content (BAC) is lower than .10. If your BAC is .10 or more then it is a crime.

USA Carry always recommends never to carry a firearm while drinking alcohol or under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Does Nevada have laws for No Guns or Firearms signs?

No. “No Guns or Firearms” signs do not have the force of law on private property in Nevada. But if the owner or management asks you to leave you must comply or you can be arrested for trespassing.

Does Nevada have a Stand Your Ground Law AKA Castle Doctrine Law?

Nevada is a state with castle law.

NRS 200.120  “Justifiable homicide” defined; no duty to retreat under certain circumstances.

      1.  Justifiable homicide is the killing of a human being in necessary self-defense, or in defense of an occupied habitation, an occupied motor vehicle or a person, against one who manifestly intends or endeavors to commit a crime of violence, or against any person or persons who manifestly intend and endeavor, in a violent, riotous, tumultuous or surreptitious manner, to enter the occupied habitation or occupied motor vehicle, of another for the purpose of assaulting or offering personal violence to any person dwelling or being therein.

      2.  A person is not required to retreat before using deadly force as provided in subsection 1 if the person:

      (a) Is not the original aggressor;

      (b) Has a right to be present at the location where deadly force is used; and

      (c) Is not actively engaged in conduct in furtherance of criminal activity at the time deadly force is used.

      3.  As used in this section:

      (a) “Crime of violence” means any felony for which there is a substantial risk that force or violence may be used against the person or property of another in the commission of the felony.

      (b) “Motor vehicle” means every vehicle which is self-propelled.

Are you allowed to carry concealed in Nevada State Parks, State & National Forests, Wildlife Management Areas, and/or Road Side Rest Areas?

State Parks: Yes
State Forests: Yes
National Forests: Yes
WMA’s: Yes
Road Side Rest Areas: Yes

Is  it legal to Open Carry in Nevada?

Please visit our Nevada Open Carry page for more information.

Changelog
10/2/2017 – Updated and confirmed all information and updated page layout.

To view a state’s concealed carry permit information click on the state. The state’s color represents whether a state is Shall Issue, May Issue, Constitutional Carry or Right Denied (We explain each state’s status here).

Shall Issue to Residents Only:
Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Guam, Louisiana, Michigan, Montana, Wyoming

Shall Issue to Residents and Non-Residents:
Arkansas, District of Columbia, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin

May Issue to Residents Only:
California, Delaware, Virgin Islands

May Issue to Residents and Non-Residents:
Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York

Constitutional Carry and Shall Issue to Residents Only:
Alaska, West Virginia

Constitutional Carry and Shall Issue to Residents and Non-Residents:
Arizona, Kansas, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire

Constitutional Carry and Does Not Issue Permits:
Vermont

Right Denied:
American Samoa, N. Mariana Islands

We keep the information on this page as up to date as possible, but due to changing laws it is your responsibility to verify all information. The information on this page is for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice concerning any particular issue or problem. Use of and access to this Website, emails or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship between i156 LLC and the user or browser. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of i156 LLC.