The Gun Books I Got for Christmas, Which You May Want to Read Too

To Ride, Shoot Straight, and Speak the Truth

To Ride, Shoot Straight, and Speak the Truth

I had a very good Christmas. I ate a lot of good food, got lots of presents and went to church. Speaking of going to church, my wife and I went with my father to his church. Sitting in front of us were 5 kids who I was pretty sure were going to kill each other.

The parents sat there doing absolutely nothing. Get this: They even let their son bring a Nerf dart gun to church. I’m pretty sure growing up if I had attempted to bring a dart gun to church it wouldn’t have gone very well. Anyway, I’m sure these kids will be on 60 Minutes one day for murdering their parents. Better them than me.

Regarding the gifts I got for Christmas, I have some good news and I have some bad news. The good news is that I got a lot of good firearms books (more on these in a moment.) The bad news is that my wife must have gotten to Santa because he did not bring me a gun for Christmas, which is hard to believe, because everyone knows Santa is a Republican. But that’s okay, because I plan to get two guns next month, including a new 1911 to make up for what Santa didn’t bring me.

Now let’s get to the books I got:

I’m very fortunate to love what I do and to have my “work reading material” be something that interests me. I try and read at least two books a month on personal protection and firearms. The following books below are what I got for Christmas and what should keep me busy for the next few months:

To Ride, Shoot Straight, and Speak the Truth by Jeff Cooper

To Ride, Shoot Straight, and Speak the Truth by Jeff Cooper

Jim Cirillo’s Tales of the Stakeout Squad by Paul Kirchner

Jim Cirillo’s Tales of the Stakeout Squad by Paul Kirchner

No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan

No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan

Surgical Speed Shooting by Andy Stanford

Surgical Speed Shooting by Andy Stanford

Practical Shooting by Brian Enos

Practical Shooting by Brian Enos

1911: The First 100 Years by Patrick Sweeney

1911: The First 100 Years by Patrick Sweeney

  1. To Ride, Shoot Straight, and Speak the Truth by Jeff Cooper
  2. Jim Cirillo’s Tales of the Stakeout Squad by Paul Kirchner
  3. No Second Place Winner by Bill Jordan
  4. Surgical Speed Shooting by Andy Stanford
  5. Practical Shooting by Brian Enos
  6. 1911: The First 100 Years by Patrick Sweeney

Each of these books is written by or about some of the best firearms instructors on the planet, so I look forward to learning a thing or two, which I’ll in turn be able to pass along to you, if you choose not to read any of them yourself.

Other than the books, I got some new jacketed hollow-point self-defense ammo and my wife wants me to inform you that she got a blender… sorry a “hand mixer,” and some “super cute” clothes. Needless to say, I was slightly more excited about the books and ammo than the blender and shirt made by some designer I’ve never heard of.

Well, time to head to the range to get some practice in, because obviously books and DVD’s can only teach you so much and you need to get out there and consistently do live-fire training too.

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  • Anonymous

    Good article!

  • Anonymous

    Shame on you Jason. You are starting to sound like a liberal anti-gun nut. You equate five children who are being rowdy in chrch with children who grow up and kill their parents. Incredible! And all because they were playing with nerf guns? Does anybody remember the case where the child in grammar school was expelled just for drawing a picture of a gun in class?  Sounds like the same thought process here Jason.  I usually read and agree with just about everything that you post. In fact the rest of the article was great. However I have to take exception to your comments regarding this family in church. At least they had their children in church.

  • Rpmevents

    Well, here’s my take on this so far (as if someone cares 😉 I assure you, I would never have been allowed to bring a gun (nerf or not) to church, but, I can see how it could be a good training tool. “Keep it in the holster and you can take it with you” kind of thing. Self restraint is a good lesson to learn early. We can all take a lesson here. Other than that, I like your entry Jason. I’ve seen some of those books before but haven’t read them. I look forward to seeing your reviews (if you desire to write any). As far as I’m concerned, it doesn’t matter about being in church or not. It could have been in a restaurant and had the same learning potential. This is a website about guns. I seen no reason to bring religion into it. But hey, that’s just me.

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