Our Top Picks For 9mm Concealed Carry Pistols

From time to time, we’ll go back and forth on what to recommend to readers who ask us, “what are your top picks for a 9mm concealed carry handgun?”

Generally, if it works with your particular build and shooting style — more power to you. We love the 9×19 mm cartridge because it’s versatile, easy to use, and blazingly accurate. Our list was carefully gleaned from both staff favorites as well as leading industry sales. Check our list and see how it compares to your top picks for 9 mm concealed carry handguns.

Glock 19 Gen 4

Glock 19 Gen 4

The Glock 19 is the quintessential off-duty police pistol. It has since become a tried and true choice for concealed carriers. The Glock 19 Gen 4 is a double stack compact pistol great for open carry as well as concealed carry. Extremely lightweight, precise as a metronome at ranges other pistols fail, and easy to fire, there’s more reasons to carry a Glock 19 than not. Features of the Glock 19 Gen 4 include:

  • Interchangeable grips
  • Striker fire, 5.5 lb trigger pull
  • Standard magazine capacity of 15 rounds
  • Rail for mounting laser and light optics

If you’re able to carry a double stack full capacity handgun that fits the compact profile, the Glock 19 is always a good choice.

MSRP: $539

NOTE: Can’t carry the Glock 19 for convenience reasons? Go with the tried and true “baby Glock”, the Glock 26. Chambered in the same caliber and offering all the versatility of the classic G19, the G26 is very favored by off-duty law enforcement who prioritize concealment over size.

Glock 43

Glock 43

For those who strictly adhere to the policy of “never being seen, always heard”, the Glock 43 is a top pick. Released in 2015, this pistol is an extremely slim, reliable single stack. There are other single stacks on the market that got there before the G43 but Glock definitely brought their own weight to bear.

Features include:

  • Striker fire, 5.5 lb trigger pull
  • Slim profile and design

MSRP: $549.99

H&K P30SK

H&K P30SK

Hechler & Koch only make one type of pistol – the efficient kind. Ergonomics from start to trigger pull is remarkable. The H&K VP-9 is already a beloved choice for gun owners and the H&K P30SK brings an extremely concealable form factor to H&K’s renowned arsenal. Features include:

  • Picatinny rail for mounting laser or flashlight sights
  • Interchangeable backstraps
  • Polygonal bore for barrel longevity and easier cleaning
  • Double action firing

The H&K P30SK comes with two 10-round magazines and definitely has that hybrid feel between a sub-compact and a compact handgun. A bit more expensive than your average 9mm concealed carry pistol, you’re paying for performance and the famous H&K aesthetics. Is it worth it as an everyday carry option? A better question would be, would you trust your life to less?

MSRP: $719

NOTE: The H&K P30SK is a smaller version of the H&K P30, not the VP-9. So if you want to try out the bigger, older brother, make sure to try one out at your local gun range.

Kahr CW9

Kahr CW9

Kahr definitely has the blocky, modular design we’re used to seeing in Glocks — but that is where the two manufacturers’ similarities end. Kahr has wormed its way into the concealed carry market because its pistols have stood up and withstood the pressures that concealed carriers need in order to trust a pistol.

Features of the Kahr CW9 include:

  • Adjustable drift sights
  • Single stack magazines
  • Double action only firing

With a standard capacity of 7 rounds in its single stack magazines, the Kahr is an industry average pistol with a great history of performance.

MSRP: $449 (new)

NOTE: Kahr also makes a premium version of the CW9 known as the PM9. Price difference is noticeable but performance is worth it.

Sig Sauer P250 Compact Carry

Sig Sauer P250 Compact Carry

Sig Sauer has always shined in the full-size duty carry and compact pistol market. Each handgun is painstakingly engineered and crafted in New Hampshire and carries the full weight and promise of the manufacturer. Where the P250 really shines is in its modular nature. It is comparable to the Glock 19 in terms of size and magazine capacity but that’s where the similarities end. This is a premium compact pistol for those unwilling to sacrifice capabilities for concealment. Notable features of the Sig Sauer P250 Compact Carry include:

  • Picatinny rail on the lower receiver for mounting laser sights and flashlight attachments
  • 15 round double stack magazine capacity
  • Double action only firing

For those who love the unique feel and grip of a Sig Sauer, the P250 is an excellent choice. It retails with two barrel lengths – 3.6″ and 3.9″ barrels. Either is acceptable for concealed carry purposes but the 3.6″ does have the added advantage of printing slightly less than the 3.9″ P250.

MSRP: $449.99

Smith & Wesson M&P Shield 9mm

Smith & Wesson M&P Shield 9mm

No list of concealed carry handguns chambered in 9mm would be complete without the Smith & Wesson M&P Shield. This handgun has taken over the market because of it’s affordable, reliable nature when chambered in 9mm.

  • Optional manual safety
  • Single stack magazines
  • Extended magazines available (8 round)
  • 6.5 lb trigger pull
  • Striker fire smoothness

Quite a few of our writers have, at one time or another, carried the S&W M&P Shield in both 9mm and .40 S&W. While the .40 S&W version definitely has quite a bit more snap, these have undoubtedly become a reliable choice for concealed carry needs. Super slim, easy to fit in an inside the waistband holster, and extremely affordable.

MSRP: $449 (new)

NOTE: If you like the S&W M&P Shield in 9mm, you may want to check out S&W’s slightly larger M&P series. A bit thicker but incredibly fun to shoot and practical for everyday concealed carry.

Springfield Armory XDS 3.3 9mm

Springfield Armory XDS 3.3 9mm

The Springfield ArmoryXD-S series has gotten plenty of traction in the concealed carry market. Featuring a variety of barrel lengths, the 3.3″ barrel proves to be the easiest to conceal. Notable features of the Springfield XDS 3.3 9mm include:

  • Picatinny rail for laser and flashlight accessories
  • Single stack magazines
  • Integrated grip and trigger safety
  • Loaded chamber indicator

At default, the Springfield XDS 3.3 9mm holds 7 rounds in its standard magazine. Springfield may also include an extended magazine that holds 8 rounds. Ergonomic, easy to shoot, and extremely safe to carry, the Springfield XDS series is a no-compromise approach to everyday concealed carry needs.

MSRP: $639.99 (new)

NOTE: If 9mm isn’t your thing, the Springfield XDS is also available in .40 S&W and .45 ACP.

Our Top Picks For 9mm Concealed Carry Pistols

Springfield Armory XD MOD.2 – 3″ Sub-Compact Model

For those who love Springfield Armory but demand their concealed carry choice is a double-stack, the Springfield Armory XD MOD.2 is a great series of handguns to get into. Available in 9mm and .40 S&W (.45ACP in 3.3″ model), they have the ammunition capacity and the trusted name of Springfield Armory weighted behind them.

These compact magazines can hold 13 rounds, with an extension magazine capable of holding 16. Between that and the safety features, this is a fantastic choice for everyday concealed carry. This is what I personally carry everyday.

MSRP: $519.99 (new)

Walther PPS

Walther PPS

We’re not debating the use and practicality of the Walther CCP with our choice of the Walther PPS. When it comes to a slim, compact, easy to shoot and full-featured concealed carry 9mm, Walther definitely hit all its marks with its Walther PPS. Unique features of the Walther PPS include:

  • Single stack magazines
  • Magazine release latch below the trigger
  • Loaded chamber indicator
  • Striker fire precision

At default, these magazines only hold 6 rounds of 9x19mm Parabellum (Luger). There’s an upgrade option for the magazines that can extend this out all the way to 8 rounds. The pistol, itself, is very concealable and it shoots wonderfully. Walther has a fantastic reputation when it comes to firearms, so choosing a Walther PPS is definitely a safe bet.

MSRP: $469 (new)

NOTE: If you like the Walther PPS, you may be interested in their new Walther PPS M2 model.

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  • G50AE

    It’s fitting that not one but TWO models of Glock pistols made the top of the list, and not a single 1911 or Hi-Power style of pistol made the list.

    • TCDrDave

      Concealed carry is harder with bigger guns?

    • The hi power and 1911 are heavy compared to the Mattel® pistols, which is a minus for some. I know with my combat commander if I run out of ammo I can always beat the perp to death with it. 🙂

    • driverq5

      I have seen a lot of 1911 malfunctions in my day. I would not carry one but know a lot of people who do. I just mentally cannot get past the malfunction issues with them. See post below.

      • Ricky Davis

        1911s must be maintained. I’ve personally carried a 1911 over 30 years and I’ve never had a single malfunction on a carry pistol

  • Stephen Johnson

    Being Blocks even made it on the list tells me the person doing this list as an absolute idiot fool.

    • smalltowndude

      That’s certainly a rational, informative post. Name calling: always persuasive!

    • Doni

      Seriously? Have you ever fired a Glock? I have both of the mentioned Glocks and they are excellent weapons. I bought the 43 for easier conceal, since I have a smaller framed body. But I can carry the 43 on an ankle holster and the 19 on my hip, if I choose, and still conceal well. Believe me they are very accurate weapons, easy to care for, and virtually never fail.

      • They are fine pistols, but like a lot of german design, functional to a fault, meaning they are fugly and for me, I like the way a single stack feels better. I think Browning got it right with the ergos on the 1911, but the glocks are more reliable.

        • Doni

          I actually almost bought the Gen3 instead of the Gen4 when I bought my 19, because the one they showed me was olive drab green and, in my view, UGLY. When I found that I could get it in black I did. You are right, they are not anything special to look at, but you can’t beat them for reliability.

          • I drive VWs and ride BMW motorcycle, so I understand the thinking in that part of the world… 🙂

          • G50AE

            Do you use Wusthof or Henckels knives? The Germans also make some really nice knives as well.

          • I use Henckels, but I’ve seen some japanese stuff of late that was nice.

          • Santa

            I have had VW’s and my last BMW R100S had 137,000 miles on it when I sold it (wasn’t safe for me to ride at 73 with a couple health issues). Fine German machines. Prefer American made Rada knifes (cost and function). But I digress, nothing to do with Glocks (fine weapons) even though they are from AUSTRIA, LOL!

          • Austria and Bavaria have some commonality with language and culture. For our honeymoon, my wife and I rented a car in Geneva and drove around Europe, visiting Switzerland, France, Italy, Austria and Germany. Austria was my favorite followed by Germany and even though I am Italian descent and could speak a bit, I thought Italy was a little nutty, something like my native New York, but Austria was the best. Good food, beer, cleanest country I’ve even seen. They really took pride in it. Germans were similar. It’s probably changed now, this was in 1994, before the Euro, but I’d love to see it again. I ride a 2009 R1200RT. So far it works well. Seems the underlying theme is to be competent, to do everything well. There are faster bikes and prettier bikes, but none as well rounded. I think it’s the germanic design philosophy of function over form. I just happen to identify with it despite my genes.

          • G50AE

            I’m a Wüsthof person myself. I even made it a point to figure out how to get the two dots over the letter u so that the brand name is spelled properly.

          • It’s easy on a Mac. 🙂

    • driverq5

      I have done qualification shooting instruction with over 500 students. I have never once seen a Glock malfunction. I do not carry one. I carry the Ruger LC9 with a galloway trigger. The LC9s has solved all trigger problems that Rugers used to have. The SR series also has great triggers. Glocks are fine guns though, no denying that based on my observations. They have great combat triggers and are easy to train non shooters to use. Carry a striker fired pistol. I have seen every make and model of 1911 malfunction.

      • I was talking to my brother yesterday, who has a 19 and 23. He said the 19 is flawless, but gets malfunctions in the 23. I have to wonder why. With a 1911, you have to know your gun and use the ammo that works best. Hardball will always work, but it’s not the best choice. Mine seems to like Winchester Silvertips, but I want to try Hornady critical duty.

        • Santa

          Shooting range Glock 19’s for the Nevada CCW (six rounds-drop the mag and insert 2nd mag for the next six) my wife’s failed every time with the last round using a California compliant mag and never with the standard mag. My 19 had both standerd mags again only loaded with six rounds each and had no failures. Guessing it is California’s fault – lol… She still was able to qualify within the time allowed for each series.

      • G50AE

        The only malfunctions I have seen with Glocks all related back to three issues,
        1- 9mm 147gr. Subsonic loads, which can be problematic in a lot of 9mm pistols, not just Glocks
        2- 40S&W 165gr. Subsonic loads, ditto
        3- Clinton Era reduced capacity 10 round magazines. That problem got solved in 2004.

        • And unsolved depending on where you live.

          • G50AE

            I will certainly concede you that point.

  • Fred Baginski

    I’ll stick with my KelTec PF-9.

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        • Sandra Gutowski

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  • Gary J. Palys

    I like my FNS-9c…

  • smalltowndude

    Luke, my man! I also carry the Springfield XD Mod 2 9mm. Love it!

    • Ricky Davis

      I carry the same pistol mostly all the time, but now I sometimes carry my Ruger LC9s… the springer gives me more peace of mind due to the magazine capacity

  • rustyknight17

    Figures… Every one of these pistols is expensive! What about those of us on a tight budget ?

    • Expensive? Compared to what? Some of these retail below 500 new. If you can’t afford new, buy used.

      • rustyknight17

        Jim for me anything above $350 is expensive due to budget constraints.

    • nekkidtuber

      Taurus 709 Slim. $199.99 shipped most places and outshoots most in this list per Guns and Ammo. Google “guns & ammo 9mm single stack shootout”.

    • Max Wasatch

      Try the Kel-Tec PF9. 7 (or 8) rounds. Usually comes in around $300-330. Extra mags are a bit pricey though and hard to find in stores.

    • bjensen

      Taurus PT111 G2

    • Mikial

      Take a look at EAA and ATI. Good quality guns at a good price, often under $400. We have three ATI’s, a Beretta 92 clone and two 1911s. High quality, reliable, accurate.

    • TarheelGlock

      Check out the SCCY CPX-2. Small 10 + 1 USA made double stack under $300.00 with lifetime warranty.
      My CC sidearm is the Glock 43 but I own a CPX to keep in my truck. Over 2,000 rounds without a hiccup.

      • Brad Holt

        My CPX is a paper weight. Been back to Daytona twice needs a third time. This last time the extractor didn’t make 75 rounds. I’ve cracked a frame with there old roll pins. Still haven’t made 500 rounds. No way I would carry it.

        • Pandaz3

          They do have a lifetime guarantee so you should be able to get it working. I don’t own one, but yours is the first negative post I’ve read about them, but then my sample size of SCCY posts is small.

    • Otto

      sccy cpx-2 $229.00

    • Ricky Davis

      Expense is relative. How much is your life worth? 500 dollars for a pistol is not expensive. You do get what you pay for. I would not want to trust my life to some 200 dollar saturday night special.

      • rustyknight17

        I’m agree, except that experience in the firearms market has taught me that it’s eminently possible to get a great handgun for$350 or less .Just look at the suggestions here. My most recent carry setup was a Bulgarian Makarov and a Zastava M88A as backup. Great guns, quite accurate, carried them every day ,cost me a bit less than$480 for both.

  • preventec47

    My number one pick for compact 9mm comes from Ruger. I compared all and I cannot believe this
    author completely skipped over Ruger.

    • Bustemhard

      I think one of the reasons why they skipped over Ruger is that some of the mini guns do not have external safety. I have an LC9S that my wife shoots and she loves it Crimson Trace so if she gets nervous just put the Red Dot on target it and let it fly but again without an external safety the only safety you have is finger placement or leave the chamber empty and fill it when you need it. You almost have to be a highly experienced shooter in order to carry some of the small 9 millimeter Rugers. The only other safe bet you have is it has a long trigger pull so you know when you’re pulling the trigger.

      • Santa

        Hi, As I remember from shooting Glocks on the range they also do not have external safeties. You LC9S does have one the LC9S Pro does not, for carry I prefer not having the external safety and being able to fire with out a magazine therefore my CCW is the LC9S Pro. I realize this is all personal choice stuff!

        • Ricky Davis

          The LC9s does have an external safety. I carry one but I never use the safety. The trigger pull is such that a safety is not required.

      • Ricky Davis

        I’m a huge fan of the Ruger LC9s

  • Hi Power…

  • Mike .

    SCCY CPX-2 ………best “bang” for the buck!

  • ImOffendedTreatMeSpecial

    SIG 290, single stack 9 that shoots like it’s big brothers but fits in your pocket or one in of the behind your cellphone belt holsters.

  • Luke Burton

    I’m pretty overweight so carrying a pistol IWB or OWB is pretty much impossible without the grip sticking straight out. I carry a Sig P938 Extreme in a pocket holster and love it. Yes it’s an expensive gun at about $700 but I shoot it very well and have had no issues so far. Some argue that If you are in a self defense situation you should consider using a cheap gun since it will be taken until the investigation is over, if it’s returned at all. To me, $700 is a good price to pay if me or my family is still alive.

    • I hear you on that. I use a pancake or what they used to call high ride holster. It works, just not concealable all the time as I live in hell, so in the summer, no one is wearing more than a shirt. Luckily, we can open carry here too. I wonder how a cross draw would work? For us, the IWB won’t work.

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    • Santa

      I have the same weight issue, I grew horizontally instead of vertically. I wear my shirts tucked in and found the “Sneaky Pete” holster in ballistic nylon works super. Looks like a large cellphone carrier, if someone asks it is “my alternative communication device”, allows for fast safe draws with my Ruger LC9s Pro.

      • I did both. It’s still a challenge.

      • Mark

        I use the leather Sneaky Pete for my S&W Shield

      • Mentaljewelry

        HA! A very persuasive communication device, indeed!

    • G50AE

      Have you tried using a shoulder holster?

      • I would, but a lot of the year it’s hot and trying to dress light enough and conceal is a bitch.

      • Luke Burton

        I will usually use a Galco Classic Lite in the winter time, usually to carry my Glock 23. When its warm out I print pretty bad with a shoulder rig. I also find it to be quite uncomfortable at times. I might try one with one of my smaller guns like the Sig 938 and see how it works out.

    • Otto

      Same here lots of blubber around the waist so no iwb for me.
      I use a belly band it’s comfortable in the winter but too sweaty in summer.

  • Santa

    Not a complaint, just surprise that the Ruger LC9s and/or LC9s Pro didn’t make the list. Good price points very accurate shooters, great trigger pull. I carry the Pro because there is no external safety, or lock when the mag is ejected. Personal preference but in the stress of needing to use a CCW I prefer regular practice and muscle memory. “Bustemhard” – as I remember Glocks are the same, IE no external safety, fine weapons and several made the list!

    • Mark Webb

      I agree Santa. Those ugly Glocks got a lot of luv, but the Rugers got no respect! Now my EDC is the LC9s! I had a custom leather IWB/OWB combo holster with extra magazine holder made. I like having the external safety and with practice on the draw motion I now release the safety between unholstering to target acquisition by muscle memory. The size fits my small hands perfectly and I changed my EDC personal defense ammo to the Ruger ARX. Firing an 84 grain load vs the 115 or 124 grains from Hornady or Federal has definitely reduced the recoil and improved my accuracy & speed to target reacquisition. An ideal marriage IMHO!

      • Patina

        Agree 100% I have owned many of these, and my two favorite 9mm single stacks are the Kahr K9 (not reviewed) and Ruger LC9s Pro. The Ruger is accurate, reliable, snag free, rounded so little print, light, and Ruger listened, got it right with the better trigger, and getting rid of the safety and mag disconnect on the Pro. Great value. The K9 costs more but is a beautiful piece, miles better than the cheaper CW9, which they did review. Accurate, tough, narrow, just feels great in your hand. There is no Glock made I would even consider trading my K9 for, no chance. I prefer the LC9s Pro to the G43 too, even tough it costs less. The Kel-Tec PF-9 should have gotten a look too. Fit and finish are a little rough, time may prove it less durable, but it is smaller, lighter, and cheaper than all the others reviewed, by a wide margin, so occupies a valuable niche in my opinion. I had a XDS for 2 weeks, then sold it. Edges too sharp, too heavy & bulky for this use. The agressive grip is cool, as are the included accessories, but this platform works better with the XDS 45. Trigger sucked, and mine was much less accurate than the Ruger or the Kahr too.

  • nekkidtuber

    This is pretty much just a list of the most popular “names”. Guns and Ammo put the Taurus 709 Slim up against pretty much every gun in this list last year. Results? It had the tightest grouping, lowest MSRP, and was one of only three in the test to go over 1000 rounds without malfunction right out of the box. PSA sells every one they can get for $199.99 shipped free.

    • Ricky Davis

      Taurus auto pistols have lots of problems unless you are using the 92 series pistols. No thank you. But if they work for you, good to go.

  • Jonathan Cable

    The SAR B6P compact should really this list. For price and ability of the gun it does not get much better.

  • G50AE

    I do also like that nowhere in this discussion of any of these pistols did anyone involved use the term “clips” to refer to pistol magazines. None of the pistols mentioned use “clips” to load ammo, they use detachable magazines.

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            Sounds TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE. Tell it like it is, “ad”.

    • Fred Miller

      Because most of the unwashed don’t realize that stripper clips were used in guns like the Garand M1 and are a completely different design. Magazines have a spring, clips do not (a lesson for you lesser beings). However, we of experience know this.

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/7cf54c3306ac398b7b913aa9c131888953336b8218ffd95e3aadab569de3499e.jpg

      • Tony White

        “A CLIP feeds a MAGAZINE and a MAGAZINE feeds a weapon…” (Which IS simple enough for those that know but (seemingly) impossible for those that don’t know and refuse to learn… IE: The anti-FREEDOM crowd.)

  • rustyknight17

    Compared to ,say a Sarsilmaz B6P , or a Taurus PT111 G2 James lagnese . I personally think that anything above $350 is expensive. And the 2 I mentioned are just as good!

    • I tend to like venerable designs that work. I think anything over 700 is expensive today. 350 is cheap.

  • 2ThinkN_Do2

    How are people surprised by selections that someone else makes about personal preferences in firearms? To each their own, and these are someone’s choices, that are just as logical or not as any other. Personally, I think Glocks are ugly, don’t like the way they feel in y hand. I don’t like the looks of most Walthers or how they fit me. Don’t like Springfield X series of any type. HK are decent, but too expensive. I like S&W, Kahr, FN & Ruger, but prefer metal over polymer. We each have our now lists; the important things are: reliability, accuracy (for you), comfort (for you) and will YOU carry it and practice with it? If you don’t do the last two, what does it matter who makes it, how popular it is or who much it costs or not?

    • Fred Miller

      Friends don’t let friends buy Glock *chuckle*, and I just don’t like Walther or Kimber. I’m a Ruger, Smith and Sig man. But….just like in Harry Potter, you don’t pick the gun as much as the gun picks you. You KNOW when the right gun for you is in your hand.

      • 2ThinkN_Do2

        I do like Kimber’s, never had an issue with my Pro Size 1911 or my Micro 9, also like CZ’s a lot. Sig, me and them are Sauer on each other; every one I’ve owned has had multiple issues. Weird are the luck of the draw works sometimes. Just traded in my P938, the Kimber Micro 9 is superior in many ways; but that’s my opinion.

        • Andy Dufrain

          I have two micro 9’s. One in stainless and one of the CDP models. Easy to carry and very concealable. I have four Kimber pistols and have never had any issues with any of them. They make a nice pistol.

  • 2ThinkN_Do2

    Reading this again, it also depends on what size pistol you are capable of carrying comfortably; which may be the most important factor. A double stack with 10 to 20 rounds might be nice to have, but how often will you carry it and how comfortable will you be? Will you be constantly fiddling with it because you don’t think it’s concealed enough? Personally a compact size double doesn’t hide well on my physical structure without a jacket or baggy shirt that hangs below the belt line by 4 – 6 inches. That said, I generally only carry something of a compact size in the late fall to late spring when I wear clothing like that. Once it goes above 50 on a regular basis I am back to a vest only and to carrying a sub-compact 3″(approx.) barrel single stack, usually IWB, sometimes vest pocket.

  • Mentaljewelry

    While some gun owners might want “the best”, not everyone can easily shell out 500-plus bucks on an item that, hopefully, will never need to be used. Although I’ve not shot one, for 150 clams I’ve heard you can’t go wrong with the Hi Point C-9. Supposedly fires any and all types of ammo, and is reliable. Heavy as a Glock, which is not likely to be used as a CCW either; hell, I’m thinking of getting one for my car’s trunk. I do like my Taurus 24/7 G2 as well as its brother, the PT111 G2. Waiting on a Ruger LCP2 to be available, although a Taurus 738 TCP was long considered, for CCW.

    • Ricky Davis

      The HiPoint and Taurus are budget pistols. If this is what you like, get it, train with it, shoot it at the range often and see if it works for you. They are not pistols I would choose, but given your said budget, get it, train and shoot with it

      • Fred Miller

        Those Hi-Points are homely, huge and heavy guns. The .40 and .45 are like boat anchors. However, they are great camp and truck guns, and come with lifetime warranties (unreal, isn’t it?) against defects or workmanship. My buddy has a .45 with 1000 rounds through it, and I don’t think it’s been cleaned once. It sits in his camp all year, and the damned thing fires every time. He once told me “It’s kind of like riding a moped or a fat chick. They’re both fun to ride but you just don’t want your friends seeing you do it”.

        • Mentaljewelry

          My thoughts too. As previously mentioned, the Hi-Point was intended for the trunk, not for sidearm. Interestingly, the C-9 weighs in similarly to a Glock, although trigger action of the Glock is far superior to Hi-Point’s. For my purposes, I still find value in the Taurus 9’s. Partial to the 911 a tad more but the 24/7 carries 17 rd.s w/ spare mag /13 rd.s. Further testimonies led to the decision to go for the RugerLCP2 for cc. Neither Taurus nor Ruger allows use of +p+ ammo.

  • Fred Miller

    They forgot the Ruger LC9s striker fired pistol, and the SIG P938. I have both of these and they are great carry guns.

    • Ricky Davis

      I love my new ruger LC9s. It’s a great pistol. I thought at first that I would not be able to hit anything with it. I usually carry an XD mod 2 subcompact. I shoot it very well. I found that after carrying the XD that the LC9s is a shooter for me personally. I can reliably hit targets to 15 yards, and that would never happen in a self defense case. The LC9s is a great personal self defense pistol

      • Fred Miller

        I thought it was going to be almost as snappy as my LCP .380, not being much larger. However, I found it to be a smooth and fun gun to shoot. Shooting police targets at 20 to 25 yards, I had a smiley face, one in the forehead, center of the throat, both neck arteries, both nipples and, at 15 yards, both testicles (Can’t help it….I like to add injury to insult). Basically, it hit whatever I aimed at, and that was using my plinking 115gr. FMJ Federal American Eagle, blowing sh!t up practice ammo. I went back to it with my 95gr. Glasier Pow’rball defense rounds and took both eyes, shoulders, elbows and the rest through the heart at 25. I had a lot of fun with that gun, almost as much as my S&W 4″ Model 10 .38s and Sig 938, which I love shooting.

  • wolaverjs

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b5c9b7d2a6a73ea31029da88f34ff00415bd0c7bfa161adea46fc671bc978335.jpg I carry the Kahr CT9; it is the full-size grip version of the CW9 in the list above. For about the same price you get 8-round single-stack magazines and a big guy like myself can comfortably get a full grip without relying on magazine extensions. Do yourself a favor though; replace the factory bar-dot sights with the 3-dot night sights.

  • Mentaljewelry

    Las Vegas is too hot for 9mm CC as are other desert states. We can open carry, but I recommend .380 (baby 9mm) ACP for CC purposes here. Most are only 6-7 rd mag, some take slight extended mags. Enough provided you’re not in a shootout…

    • It’s hot down here in AZ too. The bigger stuff is a pain in the summer, but I haven’t found something light I like, yet.

      • Mentaljewelry

        Understood, they are (.380) like holding onto a kid’s toy gun, with a three-finger grip. It’s a

        decision based on having CC for safety,and cost. I didn’t go to all the gun shows to compare the feel, just went for it based on info online. It was a trade-off. Much like in politics.

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