Ohio’s New Rules for Vehicle Carry: The Other Half of SB17

Ohio's New Rules for Vehicle Carry: The Other Half of SB17

Ohio's New Rules for Vehicle Carry: The Other Half of SB17

For months, Ohio Senate Bill 17 has been known as the “restaurant carry” bill—but there’s much more to this legislation than concealed carry in restaurants that serve alcohol. I eat in restaurants about twice a month, but I carry a pistol in my car several hours each day. When SB17 becomes law, the rules governing vehicle carry will, thanks to the bill’s authors, become safer, simpler, and fairer. The remainder of this short article is devoted to the details of the new vehicle carry rules under SB17.

At a recent CHL training class I conducted, students practiced proper procedure during police encounters. With the help of a police officer (the husband of a student in the class), students were challenged to role-­play a traffic stop while armed. Our guest LEO began the exercise with this statement: “Just as you practice marksmanship and handgun safety, you need to practice encounters with law enforcement. More CHL holders will end up in trouble as a result of a technicality during a routine traffic stop than because of an actual self­-defense scenario involving your handgun.”

Though I had no statistics to support or refute the officer’s statement, it struck me as wise. After all, there’s an excellent chance we might never have to draw a handgun in self­-defense, but there are always many things that can go wrong for an Ohio CHL holder during a routine traffic stop—most involving the manner in which the handgun is worn, transported, or handled. The current law is complex and cumbersome, requiring the CHL holder to be aware of an array of definitions and details. Ohio is the only state that places this burden on concealed carry licensees.

Continue reading at Ohioans for Concealed Carry

 

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  • Anonymous

    I am glade to hear that for ohio! its about responsiblity. worry more about the bad guys that are breaking the laws with guns than trying to create more laws and tighter laws for people who are responsible!

    • Kdurbin1

      Ohio and Louisiana need to hold each others hands as Florida has a repricol agreement for concealed carry but under Florida law no duty to inform unless directly asked also Florida concealed handgun licenses are not public record nor should they be. Ohio has very strange rules in general. My permit is valid in Ohio and 35 other states. But since when you carry into a reciprocal state you are bound by that states rules I generally avoid Ohio and Louisiana. Until they straighten out the laws I will not visit my family in Ohio

      • I teach CCW in Louisiana.  What part of Louisiana’s laws are in question?

      • I teach CCW in Louisiana.  What part of Louisiana’s laws are in question?

      • I teach CCW in Louisiana.  What part of Louisiana’s laws are in question?

  • Mark

    Ohio’s “duty to inform” is a bit strange as well, given that when my wife was stopped, the FIRST thing the officer asked was if she was carrying since he already knew from running her plate that she was licensed.

  • Louisiana does have good points:  Here, your vehicle is considered an extention of your home.  Your weapon may be loaded, unloaded, holstered, on the seat beside you, on top of the dashboard, it does not matter.  If you can legally own a fire arm you can carry it within your vehicle.

  • Louisiana does have good points:  Here, your vehicle is considered an extention of your home.  Your weapon may be loaded, unloaded, holstered, on the seat beside you, on top of the dashboard, it does not matter.  If you can legally own a fire arm you can carry it within your vehicle.

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