Interview with Rob Longenecker of Tucker Gunleather

Interview with Rob Longenecker of Tucker Gunleather

Doing research and writing articles for USA Carry got me curious about other perspectives in the CCW lifestyle.  Toward that end, I approached Rob Longenecker of  Tucker Gunleather, a Texas company which has been making high-quality holsters and gun belts since 1980. Rob’s got a lot of experience and a great deal of knowledge, and he was kind enough to share both with us.

Michael Jenkins: Speaking as someone who makes holsters, how do you see the CCW community right now?

Rob Longenecker: The community is engaged, is easily influenced by their peers online and includes a lot of newbies. They do want to have confidence in their choices and for the most part are great people to deal with.

MJ: What advice would you give to someone entering the world of CCW?

RL: Take advantage of all the information, articles and forums available for ideas and opinions, but find one or two trusted advisers you know have the training and experience to give good advice.

Experienced pistol smiths, holster-makers and professional instructors with a history in their business are a good place to start.

MJ: What are the biggest mistakes that you see folks making while carrying?

RL: Years ago customers wanted to carry the most powerful pistol possible with two extra magazines daily. Now I see folks having two or more setups, including lighter weight, smaller guns for different carry considerations.

I do believe the man who trains with one gun has an edge, but some people just need to be more flexible about their daily carry.

MJ:  Let’s talk maintenance. Any advice on holster care? 

RL: A good leather holster needs to be wiped with a damp cloth occasionally. Don’t use any oils or treatments that will soften the leather and slow your draw.  Stiff is good.

Surprisingly, one of the best methods for reviving an old leather holster is extra virgin olive oil used sparingly. It will bring back that new leather look pretty darn well.   We recommend it.

MJ: Would you mind telling us about your personal CCW setup?

RL: I carry a 4” Springfield Lightweight Champion with good aftermarket internals and proven reliability in our HF1 belt holster or our Cover Up IWB.

MJ: Any final thoughts for the USA Carry community?

Yes, you don’t need to add every possible gadget to your pistol. Lights and Lasers have some benefit in certain scenarios, but the FBI says the average gun fight is close range and over quickly.

Train yourself to draw smoothly and quickly and put sights on target instinctively.  At close range, there’s no problem with looking over the top of the gun to get your shots on target if you’ve got the training and confidence.

I took my initial training from Jeff Cooper in 1980. Spent a day with Ross Seyfried a couple of years later and had a half-day private lesson with Chip McCormick in the mid 1980’s. I’ve had some good advice.

In the 1980’s I went to the USPSA Nationals 4 times and learned from the best along the way.  Have fun and stay safe.

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  • Kenny Blankenship

    Outstanding article and was glad to see Rob spotlighted. His approach to customer service and ability to take care of a customer’s need should be taught in sales and marketing courses and other companies would do well to emulate. Rob makes it easy to buy and with the high quality, artistic and functional products he sells the customer knows he has made a wise buying decision. Way to go Rob and GO NAVY!

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