5 Hurdles Concealed Carriers Commonly Face

5 Hurdles Concealed Carriers Commonly Face

There are problems concealed carriers have to worry about that most everyone else doesn’t.  Police officers are covered under the Law Enforcement Officer Safety Act (LEOSA), which allows them to carry their handguns just about anywhere.  People who don’t carry guns in the first place never have to pay attention to signs for state lines, “gun free zones”, or anything of the sort.  They just merrily stroll where-ever they please (until danger strikes, but that’s a topic for another article).

In this article, we’re just dealing with the hurdles concealed carriers have to deal with.

The Concealed Carry Licensing Process Itself

Often the biggest hurdle to becoming a concealed carrier is the permitting process.  While many states have tried to make the process as simple as possible, there’s still plenty of arguably needless parts that can turn off many potential carriers.

In one recent instance, the State of Utah realized that a few hundred of their licensees had illegible fingerprint data.  It’s a common thing.  A slight smudge or smear makes the fingerprint illegible to the scanner.  Hundreds of concealed carriers had to go back and get their fingerprints redone.  The real question: why are fingerprints even necessary in the first place?

Sometimes concealed carriers can be put off by the process itself.  Some states have extremely invasive processes.  They want extensive investigations into a person’s private life and will sometimes use arbitrary things like outstanding debts as a disqualifier (Texas).

Determining Best Course Of Action For “Gun Free”

There are federal and state restrictions on where a concealed carrier can and cannot carry.  These rules change depending on where you are.  Most federal buildings — courthouses, jails, etc. — are off-limits.  Depending on the state, a school zone (1,000 feet area around an elementary or high school) may be off-limits and the concealed carrier will need to unload and lock up his or her firearm.

It takes awhile to get used to carrying a gun everyday.  Now, the concealed carrier has to be aware of what the ramifications are for him traveling into a legally designated “gun free zone”.  Ironically, criminals are largely unconcerned with where they can or cannot carry — a sore subject for law-abiding carriers.

State Reciprocity — Reading Between The Lines

Because states dictate the criteria for carrying a concealed handgun, both open carriers and concealed carriers have to be wary when crossing state lines.  One state may not acknowledge another’s criteria for permitting and licensing of a concealed handgun.  Therefore, your permit suddenly becomes invalid the second you step over the state line.  Confusing?  Awkward?  Dangerous?  Yes to all three.

Thankfully, we have a great section on USA Carry which goes over state-by-state reciprocity.  Check out which states acknowledge your permit before you step out of the house on that road trip.

Choosing The Right Gun For The Occasion

While there’s certainly no “one size fits all” handgun, concealed carriers often switch between a variety of different handguns to suit their mood, schedule, weather, and clothing.  Some days, it may be a snub-nosed J-frame .38 Spc.  Other days, it’s a tried-and-true Glock 26 or even 19.  This comes up a lot with concealed carriers who are worried about printing — the appearance of a gun from beneath layers of clothing.

Constantly Being Aware Of Your Surroundings

Situational awareness is the practice of being aware of what’s going on around you.   It can be tiring.  Most of us naturally filter out the outside world.  We get distracted, sink our faces into our phones, or just wander off in daydream.  Concealed carriers have to maintain a constant state of alertness and sobriety — two states of mind that can be tiresome.  But, it’s absolutely necessary.

, ,

  • Mikial

    Good information for the new CC. I never cease to be amazed at how restrictive Texas is respectively when compared to other Western states like Utah and Wyoming, given their reputation for being a state of rugged individualists and Patriots. What does your credit rating have to do with your right to carry and defend yourself and your family? If they are worried (for some indeterminate reason) that you will use your concealed weapon to rob a bank to get out of debt, if you’re of a criminal mind you aren’t going to care if it’s legal to carry or not. And you can’t even carry open there unless you have a CCW?

    Pure silliness.

    • Kevin J. Reidy

      Gun control was used as class control for years in this country,

      The less well-off always had trouble being able to defend themselves in this country. All types of conditions were put on their rights under the color of law while the wealthy and connected were handed out permits (like in NYC) that no “commoner” would ever be allowed to have.

      Texas is just following in those footsteps, using whatever reason they can pull out of their ass to keep those deemed undesirable by their betters from defending themselves.

      • Tony Perez

        I originally came from California, one of the worst when it comes to the process to get a Concealed Weapons Permit, I never bothered because of the “connected” issue. I moved to Texas and discovered a fair system in place that does not favor based on economic or political status.

        • Mikial

          Almost anywhere would be an improvement of California.

          • Tony Perez

            I can’t argue with you there Mikial! I didn’t know how restricted we were until I moved to Texas. It never made sense in California to have to explain why I wanted to carry a sidearm. Not required in Texas.

          • Mikial

            Well, let me welcome you to the land of the free! I hope things are going great for you in Texas. it’s a great place.

          • Tony Perez

            While I’m still not used to how flat the DFW region is, since I can still find good wines here, everything else is terrific! The people here are great and they (like you) have helped me feel very welcome. As a result, I give back by volunteering in my community and church more than I ever did before. Thanks Mikial!

  • Mike C

    Credit worthiness? I thought I had heard it all here in Massachusetts! It goes to show what can happen when folks that don’t CCW or even own guns are allowed to make laws governing them.

  • Sgt. Blutwurst

    While I admit that criminals will often just steal or buy guns illegally, I can’t deny the utility of not allowing felons or people with some mental problems from buying guns, so background checks have their uses, and fingerprints are the accepted way for performing them. Of course, liberals have obstructed getting mentally ill people on to searchable databases under the guise of “not stigmatizing” them, but still, I don’t want a paranoid schizophrenic buying a nice big .45 on command of the voices…

    • Mikial

      “Of course, liberals have obstructed getting mentally ill people on to searchable databases under the guise of “not stigmatizing” them, but still, I don’t want a paranoid schizophrenic buying a nice big .45 on command of the voices…”

      Can’t argue with you on this as far as it goes. But, the real problem here is that the definition of mentally ill is pretty broad. For example, at one point PMS was actually listed as a mental illness in the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual) that mental health professionals use to provide the diagnosis for patients. Technically and legally, that would have made a woman who went to see a counselor for help in managing the mood swings of PMS mentally ill.

      And there are other issues with the concept such as Obama’s blanket determination that someone on SS who has someone else manage their bank account is not competent to buy a gun. The no-fly list is yet another example.

      The government is denying people their Constitutional rights with no due process under the guise of safeguarding society. It’s easy to say we agree with preventing people who shouldn’t have guns from getting them, but put yourself in the shoes of the person being denied with no due process and in the case of the no-fly list, no explanation of why you’re even on it and it doesn’t seem like such a good idea after all.

      • Mikial

        I should probably add that the inclusion of PMS as a diagnosed mental illness created a lot of controversy and was subsequently removed from the DSM, but it still means that those women have a medical history that includes the diagnosis.

  • Doni Juarez

    Then there is also the financial end of getting your permit. The class, ranging from about $50 to $100, the cost of the application. $90 here. Then the long wait for the approval. Also, some places have a “may issue” not a “shall issue” clause, meaning that even after your fees, classes, and background check, the Sheriff may not have to issue the permit.
    The 2nd Amendment is the only one that states “…shall not be infringed…”, yet it is the only one which is infringed. We do not have to pay fees, have background checks, or apply, to use any of our other rights.

Quantcast
[index]
[index]